U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-15-2010, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX!!!!
3,737 posts, read 5,289,087 times
Reputation: 1665
Quote:
Originally Posted by orbius View Post
Circle C or Steiner Ranch are obviously bedroom communities for other parts of the city despite being in Austin.
I dont subscribe to the hard and fast rule that it must have a different name tagged to it to qualify as a bedroom community.
Circle C is a 10 minute drive from downtown, 20 if there is traffic. I am not sure how you can call that a bedroom community. It is a subdivision that only has a few thousand houses. I have a feeling the term means something other than you think it does. Many of my neighbors work right here in SW Austin either at AMD or Freescale.

For a description of bedroom community see Commuter town - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"bedroom communities have few local businesses and most residents who have jobs commute to employment centers some distance away. Commuter towns may be in rural or semi-rural areas, with a ring of green space separating them from the larger city or town. Where urban sprawl and conurbation have erased clear lines among towns and cities in large metropolitan areas, this is not the case." (emphasis added)

This hardly describes Circle C. We have dozens of local businesses and most of my neighbors work downtown or south of the river.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-15-2010, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
2,333 posts, read 5,117,281 times
Reputation: 891
Quote:
Originally Posted by migol84 View Post
There certainly are more proposals for downtown Austin, some are just pending. There's the Seaholm and Greenwater Treatment Plan, there's the T. Stacey Towers on 5th and Congress, the Waller Creek redevelopment and the F1 tracks. Just give it another 5 years or so you'll see another building boom.
If it's downtown, then I'm down. I just think it's nice for Austin to take a breath, get used to some of the changes and enjoy itself before bringing out the cranes again.

Many of those pending projects will die on the vine due to lack of financing. However, there will be others that take their places. The Waller Creek project is still moving forward, it's just multi-phased.

The one project I really do loathe is the expensive condo building that was constructed on Barton Springs behind Uncle Billy's and Austin Java. Besides being a cool trailer park neighborhood, it was a beautiful stand of pecan trees that would have made a stunning urban park. What they built there is out of scale with everything else around it. That's what I hate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2010, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
2,333 posts, read 5,117,281 times
Reputation: 891
Quote:
Originally Posted by orbius View Post
Austin went from a government and university town to a gigantic bedroom community.
I know it's already been said but no, Austin is not a bedroom community. That is an incorrect usage of the term. A more accurate description is that Austin went from a university/government town to a mid-size city very quickly without really making the proper adjustments. It also does not have the typical amenities found in other cities of the same or similar size - pro sports, museums not affiliated with a university, zoos, planetarium, etc...blah, blah, blah. This is simply the truth. Whether enough people actually care about those things are another matter. Many people seem to. Personally, I would like to have a better art museum and a beautiful downtown library.

The problem is that while Austin has grown, it's infrastructure has not kept up - it is still at the level of a large town. Now before everyone overreacts and talks about killing golden geese etc...I'm not suggesting cutting down all of the beautiful pecan trees and building 8-lane highways through neighborhoods. But the city's infrastructure is clearly behind. The public transportation, lack of quality bike lanes and pedestrian infrastructure are an embarrassment for a city with progressive ambitions. There are a lot of smart people out there, they should be able to find progressive solutions we can all live with. But it will take time.

I think that's where a lot of people get frustrated: what the city (or rather its citizens) thinks it is and what it actually is are two very different things.

Last edited by twange; 09-15-2010 at 10:40 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2010, 10:19 PM
 
Location: san francisco
2,059 posts, read 1,917,367 times
Reputation: 737
Quote:
Originally Posted by twange View Post
If it's downtown, then I'm down. I just think it's nice for Austin to take a breath, get used to some of the changes and enjoy itself before bringing out the cranes again.

Many of those pending projects will die on the vine due to lack of financing. However, there will be others that take their places. The Waller Creek project is still moving forward, it's just multi-phased.

The one project I really do loathe is the expensive condo building that was constructed on Barton Springs behind Uncle Billy's and Austin Java. Besides being a cool trailer park neighborhood, it was a beautiful stand of pecan trees that would have made a stunning urban park. What they built there is out of scale with everything else around it. That's what I hate.
The ones that will most likely die out are T. Stacey and 21c.... the developers of 360 are also planning another building next to the post office on 6th. The Greenwater Treatment Plan is moving along as scheduled... most likely so is Seaholm.

I heard that the Barton Springs condo developers went bankrupt... if I'm not mistaken? But I think all of this is part of the growing process. Win some, lose some. Many are just not giving Austin much credit for its accomplishments and what it's striving to be. I think eventually Austin residents will give in to Austin's new way of "urban life." This is something quite new even for Texas.

More people in downtown, more variety, more culture = less boring. At least that's what I think.

As for now I'm enjoying every second of Austin before I head back out to San Francisco. People should just learn to appreciate Austin for what it is. But Austin is getting there... slowly but surely, it's getting there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2010, 12:59 PM
 
Location: The Lone Star State
5,017 posts, read 3,187,502 times
Reputation: 3229
Quote:
Originally Posted by twange View Post
A more accurate description is that Austin went from a university/government town to a mid-size city very quickly without really making the proper adjustments. It also does not have the typical amenities found in other cities of the same or similar size - pro sports, museums not affiliated with a university, zoos, planetarium, etc...blah, blah, blah. This is simply the truth. Whether enough people actually care about those things are another matter. Many people seem to. Personally, I would like to have a better art museum and a beautiful downtown library.

The problem is that while Austin has grown, it's infrastructure has not kept up - it is still at the level of a large town. Now before everyone overreacts and talks about killing golden geese etc...I'm not suggesting cutting down all of the beautiful pecan trees and building 8-lane highways through neighborhoods. But the city's infrastructure is clearly behind.
I agree on both points.

Houston and Dallas had a history of lots of "old money" from the oil industries. These old money families helped to establish what, especially in Houston, is a world-class scene of several museums and the arts today.

As far as roads, they can be done well. For example, roads with a grassy & tree median down the center, and trees lining the sides, are 10x nicer looking than just asphalt or concrete.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2010, 01:05 AM
 
104 posts, read 273,163 times
Reputation: 59
Default Where is the best place to live?

Back to the O.P... I've always wondered if this is the place I should live. There are so many other places in the U.S.

I think it is best to travel to a variety of places as a vacation and check it out for some time prior to moving. Perhaps you may find a "better" place on your next visit. I've been to some cities such as Seattle, San Francisco, and Salt Lake City, and enjoyed all of them. I think the climate change affects you in each of these places and makes each place feel even more different.

I don't see myself living here forever for some reason. I think I miss the change of seasons from the northeast.

It is fascinating though to view Google Maps and see all of the places you could live in the U.S. or around the world. There is not enough time for seeing everything and so one needs to ask themselves what they were really brought here to do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2010, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX!!!!
3,737 posts, read 5,289,087 times
Reputation: 1665
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoundRockinite View Post
Back to the O.P... I've always wondered if this is the place I should live. There are so many other places in the U.S.

I think it is best to travel to a variety of places as a vacation and check it out for some time prior to moving. Perhaps you may find a "better" place on your next visit. I've been to some cities such as Seattle, San Francisco, and Salt Lake City, and enjoyed all of them. I think the climate change affects you in each of these places and makes each place feel even more different.

I don't see myself living here forever for some reason. I think I miss the change of seasons from the northeast.

It is fascinating though to view Google Maps and see all of the places you could live in the U.S. or around the world. There is not enough time for seeing everything and so one needs to ask themselves what they were really brought here to do.
It's funny you should bring this up. We went to Baltmore/DC area for a visit last week. When we decided to leave Seattle, this was one of the places we considered. While the topography is beautiful there, after the first day, I was really glad we ended up in Austin.

The cost of everything was substantially higher and the people, overall, seemed cold compared to the people here. Sometimes the drivers here will not let you in, but there it was almost every single driver. I thought I'd go nuts if we'd moved there. Life is just so much easier here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top