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Old 09-17-2009, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
2,081 posts, read 2,468,610 times
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There ought to be an Austin FAQ specifically for Californians moving here so that we don't have to constantly get asked by them why there isn't a Trader Joe's in Austin.
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Old 09-17-2009, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
16,509 posts, read 23,002,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passionatearts View Post
There ought to be an Austin FAQ specifically for Californians moving here so that we don't have to constantly get asked by them why there isn't a Trader Joe's in Austin.
"Because you're not in Kansas any more, Dorothy."
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Old 09-18-2009, 08:07 AM
 
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I guess it makes more sense that people are saying they miss Trader Joe's because of the cheap wine and I assume other alcohol. I just never thought it was that great because it's so small and crowded. I would stop by the ones in Sunnyvale or in Campbell (CA) on a weekend and it just wasn't worth the trouble of fighting the crowds for me to get a couple boxes of Clif bars. At the time I think individual bars were only 10 cents cheaper than Whole Foods anyway.

I don't drink, so the wine doesn't appeal to me. They had a lot of imported chocolate and stuff like that. I rarely eat chocolate and try to only eat sweets when I go out some place, so that wasn't a big deal. It wasn't really a health food place in my opinion. They would pile the chocolate up right by the registers so people would make impulse buys. I guess you can chalk me up as an ex-Californian that doesn't really care if Trader Joe's ever makes it to Texas.
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Old 09-18-2009, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
5,327 posts, read 6,600,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark311 View Post
I guess it makes more sense that people are saying they miss Trader Joe's because of the cheap wine and I assume other alcohol. I just never thought it was that great because it's so small and crowded. I would stop by the ones in Sunnyvale or in Campbell (CA) on a weekend and it just wasn't worth the trouble of fighting the crowds for me to get a couple boxes of Clif bars.

Yeah, it's so crowded, nobody goes there any more!
(Apologies to Groucho or Yogi or whomever).

One category that I miss from TJ's is reasonably priced organic products such as coffee and cereals. TJ's organic decaf was actually less than most regular coffee from other 'quality' suppliers.
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Old 09-18-2009, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Round Rock
482 posts, read 1,159,089 times
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I am so tired of people assuming that if you love Trader Joes then you must be from California. Well, I'm from Chicago and I love Trader Joes. They are all over Chicago. Trader Joes has REASONABLY priced organic products. I just don't know how people can afford Whole Foods.
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Old 09-18-2009, 11:22 AM
 
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I agree with you mother. I was born in Texas, but lived in California long enough to enjoy Trader Joe's more than I have ever enjoyed Central Market or Whole Foods. I can't afford either of them. But I am glad that HEB has started carrying my favorite IPA from California, Lagunitas. And other people must also be pleased because the d*mn beer is always sold out whenever I go to Hancock Center to buy it! Before anyone blames Californians, it's probably just the Hyde Park Highbrow crowd. They're a discriminating bunch.

Oh, and my Trader Joe's in Oakland was never really that crowded. It was also a fairly new one right near Lake Merritt. So I never had an issue with crowds.

Last edited by Nomadic9460678748; 09-18-2009 at 11:31 AM..
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Old 02-22-2010, 11:00 PM
 
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to Itchick and others: might interest you to know that the guy who owns TJs is a German chap who started Aldi...

taken from an article on cyclingforums.com (no i have no idea either what it's doing there...)


"The American Way of Aldi

A U.S. business magazine telling Americans to "Buy German?" This strange but true Forbes headline
recently highlighted one of the biggest German success stories in America: Trader Joe's.

Europeans have long been fans of the no-frills discount bins at Aldi supermarket stores, which offer
everything from champagne to cut flowers at prices often steeply discounted from those of
competitors. But few here are familiar with Trader Joe's, Aldi's upmarket American discount chain,
which has seen incredible growth in recent decades.

Since 1977, the company has been owned by Theo Albrecht, the billionaire behind the Aldi Nord
supermarket chain. Trader Joe's has more than 200 stores across the U.S. and rings up an estimated
$2.1 billion in annual revenues.

Strike brings boom

The company's fortunes climbed even further this winter, as 75,000 grocery clerks in Southern
California abandoned their cash registers after the state 's largest supermarkets, including
Albertson's, Kroger and Safeway, sought to reduce their health insurance and pensions. Uneager to
cross the picket lines, many consumers poured into their local Trader Joe's instead.

A non-union company, Trader Joe's pays its employees an average of $21 per hour compared to the
$17.90 paid by the union shops. The company also offers employees health insurance and retirement
benefits. Its generous labor practices and environmentally conscious products offer customers just
the mix it needed to make the jump from larger grocery stores to a smaller shop with a more refined
selection.

Though the company -- owned by the famously reclusive Theo Albrecht, who with his brother is
estimated to be worth $26.5 billion -- is mum when it comes to discussing finances, Forbes recently
estimated that Trader Joe's 74 stores in California have experienced a jump in revenues of 30
percent since the strike began.

Pleasures from Polynesia and the world

As other cashiers have taken to the picket lines, Trader Joe's workers have continued ringing up
dried fruits, European cheeses, meats and vegetables in their trademark Hawaiian shirts -- a symbol
of the company's casual and laid back Polynesian style that sometimes makes it feel like more of a
hangout place than den of consumerism.

But the cashiers and products aren't the only thing that differentiate Trader Joe's from the
competition. Like Aldi, more than 80 percent of the products sold at Trader Joe's are produced by
other company's but sold under the Trader Joe label. The company sells its wares under the Trader
Giotto, Trader Jose, Trader Ming and Trader Jacques brands among others, representing the store's
hefty international lineup of the kinds of goodies that make foodies drool.

Trader Joe's also partners with wineries to bring high-quality but low-cost wines to its outlets,
like Charles Shaw, otherwise known as "Two Buck Chuck," which has taken America by storm. Between
20-25 percent of Trader Joe's products are imported from overseas.

Along with the international selection, the company is equally known for its superior quality and
bargain basement prices. Trader Joe's keeps costs down by selling fewer products -- 2,500 compared
to up to 40,000 at larger supermarkets.

A different kind of customer

The nautically themed stores, where managers are called captains, also attract a different kind of
customer than the average supermarket. The German newsweekly Der Spiegel recently described them as
"yoga crazed, Bush opponents or ballerinas." Others have described it as one-stop shopping for
"Bourgeois Bohemians," the socially conscious, well-educated middle class with income to spare.
Describing Trader Joe's clientele, the Los Angeles Times once wrote: "They're people who protect
their tattoos with sunscreen."

The fact that the company steers clear of more controversial foods, like duck, whose breeders animal
rights activists accuse of animal abuse, also makes it an obvious choice for more socially
conscientious customers.

The success of Trader Joe's isn't the only Albrecht success story in the United States. Aldi itself
is a growing brand on the other side of the Atlantic. Since opening its first store in 1976, Aldi
has expanded its presence to 671 stores in 25 states. According to a 2002 study by the Agricultural
Marketing Resource Center at Iowa State University, Aldi ranked as the #21 supermarket chain in the
U.S., with estimated revenues exceeding $3 billion annually."
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Old 03-14-2011, 10:52 PM
 
1 posts, read 878 times
Reputation: 10
Default How about non-GMO

I'm about to move to Austin, and Trader Joes is currently the only grocer I know of that is committed to non-GMO. Does anyone know these Austin stores' take on GMOs? I don't trust Whole Foods, and they're a rip-off anyway.
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Old 05-03-2011, 10:01 AM
 
715 posts, read 803,601 times
Reputation: 625
Default Trader Joe's coming to Austin!!

Announced on statesman.com this morning!!!
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Old 05-03-2011, 10:03 AM
 
1,904 posts, read 4,640,712 times
Reputation: 1010
Here's a link:

Business, Personal Finance, Technology, Employment news for Austin and Central Texas | Statesman.com
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