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Old 11-14-2011, 12:09 PM
 
4,053 posts, read 6,348,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pulzar View Post
Bachelor degree density:

San Francisco Tops List Of Cities With Most College Degrees (CHART)

Austin is quite a bit higher than both Houston and Dallas, although they all pale in comparison to SF and NYC. Of course, this is skewed towards dense cities to begin with..
Thats interesting but I think it makes more sense to adjust for population density per square mile (which essentially gets you per capita degrees).

San fran population density per square mile is 17179/sq mile. Austin is 2600.

Adjusted for population density (i.e. if we had the same general density as san fran) then we would have 5500 degrees/mile.

Here is an article which compares per capita degrees (although the actual ranking compares other factors)
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Old 11-16-2011, 12:40 AM
 
Location: South Central Texas via Worcester County, MA
2,713 posts, read 1,988,732 times
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Austin proper is liberal by Texas standards, moderate by NE standards. The rest of Travis County is moderately conservative. Most of the rest of Texas outside of the major cities is very conservative, like you described. Coming from MA, it was an adjustment coming to SA at first, but you'll be fine. I've been here five years...no regrets. I came here with an open mind, though. Most of the people here with extremely negative attitudes are dealing with other issues. The stereotypes are accurate only if you're in some little Podunk town. The demographics and political ideals of Texans fall into every spectrum imaginable.
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Old 11-16-2011, 01:19 AM
 
Location: san francisco
2,059 posts, read 2,003,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thenewtexan View Post
Austin proper is liberal by Texas standards, moderate by NE standards. The rest of Travis County is moderately conservative. Most of the rest of Texas outside of the major cities is very conservative, like you described. Coming from MA, it was an adjustment coming to SA at first, but you'll be fine. I've been here five years...no regrets. I came here with an open mind, though. Most of the people here with extremely negative attitudes are dealing with other issues. The stereotypes are accurate only if you're in some little Podunk town. The demographics and political ideals of Texans fall into every spectrum imaginable.
I've yet been answered the question.... how liberal must Austin get to be considered truly liberal? Not that I care... I'm just always scratching my head when people say its "moderately liberal" as if its a very very bad thing.
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Old 11-16-2011, 07:24 AM
 
Location: South Central Texas via Worcester County, MA
2,713 posts, read 1,988,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by migol84 View Post
I've yet been answered the question.... how liberal must Austin get to be considered truly liberal? Not that I care... I'm just always scratching my head when people say its "moderately liberal" as if its a very very bad thing.
At what point did I say being moderately liberal is a bad thing? I consider myself a moderate liberal. The OP is coming from a major urban area in the Northeast. I have the same backround, so I can understand her concern as a transplant. Example: Her mother is a lesbian. Austin is located in Texas. In Texas, it is legal to fire someone for being gay. Therefore, if you think I'm going to say Austin is "very liberal" to the point of being compared to San Franciso, New York, DC, or Boston, I would be lying.
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Old 11-16-2011, 09:04 AM
 
Location: san francisco
2,059 posts, read 2,003,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thenewtexan View Post
At what point did I say being moderately liberal is a bad thing? I consider myself a moderate liberal. The OP is coming from a major urban area in the Northeast. I have the same backround, so I can understand her concern as a transplant. Example: Her mother is a lesbian. Austin is located in Texas. In Texas, it is legal to fire someone for being gay. Therefore, if you think I'm going to say Austin is "very liberal" to the point of being compared to San Franciso, New York, DC, or Boston, I would be lying.
I didn't mean to say you were the one making it sound like that... it was just a question in general.
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Old 11-16-2011, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
664 posts, read 705,526 times
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I agree that Austin is moderately liberal. I think a big negative about living in Texas when one is a Democrat is that your vote never counts. I was excited about moving to liberal Austin after having lived in very conservative Plano. Imagine my surprise to find that my congressional rep. was a Republican because of the extreme gerrymandering that has gone on in Texas by the Republican majority. My district in NW Austin was a tiny little sliver attached to a huge swath of conservative countryside and the northern suburbs of Houston, which are also conservative.

Yes, there are people of all political stripes in Texas and in Austin, but we are effectively being disenfranchised. I'm very happy to be living in a swing state now where my vote will actually count.
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Old 11-16-2011, 04:55 PM
 
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I just posted about my plan to move from Austin to Philadelphia next year:
Austin to Philadelphia in 2012

I've lived in Austin for over 20 years and currently live in Hyde Park, which is a great walkable central neighborhood just north of the UT campus. Travis Heights and the others mentioned in a previous post are also great. You may have to settle for less sq. footage in those areas but not having to drive across town is so worth it. It seems to be more liberal in attitude closer into the city also, less "Texan", if that makes sense.

The weather will probably be an adjustment for you though.

Let me know if you have other questions & good luck with your move.
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Old 11-17-2011, 11:35 AM
 
367 posts, read 425,560 times
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This may be off track but is Center City Philly that expensive where you couldnt buy a house there for 500k to 800k?

Given that property taxes are expensive in Austin, you could send 1 kid to private school in Philly. Also arent the suburbs in Philly supposed to very nice and affordable (by nyc or Ca standards)?

I say this because even the most walkable area of Austin are nothing close to Center City Philly. I thought one of the big advantages of Philly was that is had big city amenities but a much lower cost of living.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobokenkitchen View Post
I have actually heard some good things about Austin but am a bit nervous about Texas as a whole.

We currently live in Center City Philadelphia and really like it. We like being able to walk everywhere and that there is so much going on in the city and that the neighborhoods are so pretty and rich with history.

However we are pregnant with our first baby and starting to think that a house with more space and decent schools might be a good idea. DH may be getting a job offer in Austin and we would like to get a feel for whether we would fit in.

I'm in my mid 30s and DH is 40. My Mom (who will come and visit relatively regularly) is a lesbian. We are really quite liberal in our views and we don't attend Church.

We would be looking for a 3 or preferably 4 bedroom home in a great, friendly neighborhood and I guess we now have to pay attention to the school system.
We could pay from 500 to about 850 for a house, but am concerned about the real estate tax situation. We paid 700 for our current house and taxes are $5300, but we pay city wage tax on top.

Any 'odd' taxes that we might not be aware of like city wage tax in Philly?

Are we going to stick out like a sore thumb as liberal, pro gay marriage, pro universal health care, non church going, older first time parents? Or is Austin pretty easy going?
I will say we don't advertise our views - no bumper stickers here, and at first view most people take as for conservative for some reason, but we're not.

If health care, gay marriage and religion come up would it be most sensible to keep quiet about our views? I am normally pretty outspoken and by far the majority (but not all) of our friends tend to share most of our views.

Thoughts? The stereotype of Texans is conservative, traditional and religious. We are none of those things and I'm English so not really sure how fair or unfair the stereotype is.
If you tell me I'm worrying needlessly I will be delighted!
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Old 11-17-2011, 02:20 PM
 
509 posts, read 850,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skyao View Post
This may be off track but is Center City Philly that expensive where you couldnt buy a house there for 500k to 800k?

Given that property taxes are expensive in Austin, you could send 1 kid to private school in Philly. Also arent the suburbs in Philly supposed to very nice and affordable (by nyc or Ca standards)?

I say this because even the most walkable area of Austin are nothing close to Center City Philly. I thought one of the big advantages of Philly was that is had big city amenities but a much lower cost of living.
Agreed. The OP could buy a great house for that money in a walkable suburb of Philly (eg: Wayne, Media, etc.) with great schools. That way they would still have access to all of the wonderful things Philly has to offer but with more space and better schools. Oh, and WAY lower property taxes than in Austin.

Unless the job that the OP's husband is moving for is a promotion or they really don't want to be in Philly anymore, I don't understand the move either. To each their own...
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Old 11-17-2011, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
4,666 posts, read 8,744,476 times
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Has the OP even returned to this enormous thread?

OP, I lived in Austin for 10 years and bottom line, from the way you described yourself, your family would be fine. I know several people in Austin who are very similar to you and even though they live in the suburbs because of affordability and school issues, they are completely happy living there. All of them are older parents because my peer group spent their young adulthood in grad school.
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