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Old 01-11-2012, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
5,175 posts, read 6,002,018 times
Reputation: 1924
Quote:
Originally Posted by austinnerd View Post
.

10scoachrick, I thought that large storage space attached to my house was specifically designed for boxes and what-not. You mean to tell me that folks use it for temporary storage of their horseless carriages, get out!



OR your can do as my neighbors do. Park the classic '57 Bel Air in the garage and leave >$100K in vehicles in the driveway(new X5 and Camaro SS) . Hope those hailstorms stay away this spring!
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Old 01-11-2012, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
12,278 posts, read 12,000,032 times
Reputation: 7534
Quote:
Notwithstanding any provision in this Declaration to the contrary, an Owner shall be permitted, without Architectural Committee approval, to erect one (1) outbuilding on the Owner's Lot if (i) the surface area of the pad on which the outbuliding is placed is less than or equal to eighty (80) square feet, (ii) the height of the outbuilding, measured from the surface of the Lot to the higest portion of the outbuilding is less than or equal to six (6) feet, (iii) the outbuilding is constructed within an area completely enclosed by a privacy fence of not less than six (6) feet in height, (iv) the exterior of the outbuilding is constructed of the same or substantially similar materials as the exterior of any residence located on the Lot, and (v) ...
I agree with the OP that this paragraph suggests the owner can build an "outbuilding" without Architectural Committee approval if it meets the requirements in this paragraph.

But a metal building cannot be claimed to match the exterior materials of the OP's home because the garage door is metal. The garage door is probably less than 10% of the exterior of the home not counting the roof. The OP would never describe his home as made of sheet metal. Instead he would say it is made of stone and siding, brick and siding, stucco, etc. It is clear the HOA wants outbuildings to like "substantially similar" to the home it shares a lot with.
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Old 01-11-2012, 08:21 AM
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Location: San Antonio
14,369 posts, read 20,288,678 times
Reputation: 9484
Why don't you want to work with the architectural control committee? You're assuming they'll just say "no." They'll probably say "Yes, but..." and supply conditions under which your project will be acceptable.
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Old 01-11-2012, 09:16 AM
 
5 posts, read 4,188 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo View Post
Why don't you want to work with the architectural control committee? You're assuming they'll just say "no." They'll probably say "Yes, but..." and supply conditions under which your project will be acceptable.
I think this is your best bet also.
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Old 01-11-2012, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Heights
594 posts, read 589,899 times
Reputation: 448
Quote:
Originally Posted by austinnerd View Post

10scoachrick, i thought that large storage space attached to my house was specifically designed for boxes and what-not. You mean to tell me that folks use it for temporary storage of their horseless carriages, get out!
:d
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Old 01-11-2012, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Southwest Austin
4,884 posts, read 9,346,664 times
Reputation: 3326
Well, a crappy metal shed from Home Depot will subtract or, at best, have neutral impact on the resale value of your home and will look progressively uglier with each passing year.

On the other hand, a slightly more expensive wood-panel sided shed, positioned well on the side edge or back corner of the yard, painted to match the house, will be viewed as a more permanent feature of the home, will add or, at worst, have neutral impact on the value of the home, and will provide a more aesthetically pleasing, more functional and more and durable asset for your back yard. It will also be less unsighlty to neighbors, which is why the HOA has the rule in the first place.

I guess my question would be, HOA aside, why would anyone opt for the crappier, uglier product given the above realities? Why not just spend a little bit more and do it right?

Steve
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Old 01-11-2012, 11:39 AM
 
2,291 posts, read 2,924,700 times
Reputation: 1180
I think the HOA guidelines are pretty clear. It has to be constructed of a material that is the same or substantially similar as your house. Your house is not substantially made of metal. In fact, the garage door is not technically even structural. You are grasping at straws.
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Old 01-11-2012, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
6,808 posts, read 10,276,036 times
Reputation: 2896
I thought it was pretty common knowledge that HOAs and sheds or outbuildings don't mix. At least for your typical, suburban lot size HOA.

Thinking you could put up a home depot shed when you live in an HOA area is kind of like thinking you could paint your house purple, or store an RV in front of your home... I mean really, what did you expect?
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Old 01-11-2012, 12:24 PM
 
509 posts, read 592,782 times
Reputation: 393
"or is the HOA management company in the business of annoying and harrassing homeowners instead of working for them?"


Hahaha! Welcome to the layercake, son. HOA's live to tell people what they can't do and make sure everyone looks and acts the exact same at all times . If you do anything different you've ruined their illusion of Stepfordville.
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Old 01-11-2012, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
8,590 posts, read 17,251,022 times
Reputation: 3445
Most HOAs allow sheds....Home Depot has a Tuff Shed called the HOA Special or something - it is wood side, shingle roof, and 6 feet tall at the peak.

In my neighborhood (Villages of Western Oaks), I would guess that 2/3 of the houses have sheds. Technically, I think our HOA only requires the 'similar' construction materials and matching roof, and defers to the COA shed restrictions, which allows up to 8 feet; however, COA requires 5 foot offset from any property line or easement. Most people seem to go with the 'hidden' short shed and offset about 2 feet .
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