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Old 03-01-2012, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
460 posts, read 595,908 times
Reputation: 329
As a (relatively) long-time New Yorker I don't think that's a fair standard to hold any city outside of NYC, LA, or Chicago to, with Boston, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Dallas, and San Francisco close behind them. Even if you had the same percentage of racial distribution (which you certainly don't) Austin's population is less than ten percent of New York City's and about a quarter of LA's.

What you want is certainly not an unreasonable preference but it's a big city preference. Austin is a small city, just slightly larger than Portland or Seattle and another notch above a place like Raleigh. Compared to any other city its size *in Texas* Austin is a liberal place, but a liberal place in one of the more conservative states in the US is never going to compare to Portland or even Seattle.

This reminds me a little of my wife commenting on the weather in Austin in February. It might be fifty five degrees outside and my wife (who is from southern CA) will comment on how cold it is, but for me (from the Northeast) that's balmy in February. Similar also to the theatre world, something that interests me quite a lot. For a city its size, Austin's theater community is great. Compared even to Philadelphia, it barely registers, and NYC would eat it for breakfast. I've never heard anyone from Austin suggest otherwise on any of these points.
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Old 03-01-2012, 10:08 AM
 
2,254 posts, read 3,238,485 times
Reputation: 912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquitaine View Post
What you want is certainly not an unreasonable preference but it's a big city preference. Austin is a small city, just slightly larger than Portland or Seattle and another notch above a place like Raleigh.
I basically agree with your points. However, your comparisons sound accurate, but when outsiders look at the list of US city population size, you'll see that Austin is actually 14th and considerably larger than the cities that you mentioned. This is just another way that on-line information can give someone the wrong impression even though the information presented on paper is accurate. Nearby metro areas can definitely skew this list and the person researching it might not be looking for other explanations. See the link below:

List of United States cities by population - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Again, I agree with you, but if you put the data found at the link above in front of someone, their expectations might be different than yours.

Look at the metro area list that you're referencing and you get a different feel:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_o...tistical_Areas
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Old 03-01-2012, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Austin
773 posts, read 548,824 times
Reputation: 911
Quote:
Originally Posted by sajae90 View Post
Austin, to me, is very conservative. Being conservative can have its positives and negatives, but compared to other cities, YES, it is very conservative, especially the Southwest and West area of Austin. I was shocked to come to Austin after their claims of being so 'liberal'.
Austin proper is still liberal. However, most people don't live in Austin proper, so they don't see it. When I use the term "Austin proper," this is what people living in the sprawl refer to as "Central Austin." It's what gives the metroplex its blue spot on the voting map.

But I will agree 100 percent that the sprawl is very conservative, and parts of it are scary conservative in the Bible Belt way. The part of Austin where my S.O. lives has so many churches, you can spit and hit ten. And Williamson Country is as provincial as areas come.

So if you don't live in Austin proper, it's almost guaranteed that you'll be in a very conservative area and view Austin as "conservative."
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Old 03-01-2012, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
6,813 posts, read 10,380,563 times
Reputation: 2901
The way the word "diversity" has become so perverted that people actually can use it to describe the exact opposite always amazes me.

Anyway, that's what happens when people claim Austin is "not diverse"... So please, if you are going to claim that, then just use another word to say what you really mean.

Here are the population distributions of two cities. Which do you think is typically called the more diverse city?

City A:
* Race 1 - 689,965 (75.7%)
* Race 2 - 120,891 (13.3%)
* Race 3 - 67,361 (7.4%)
* Race 4 - 15,184 (1.7%)
* Two or more races - 13,548 (1.5%)
* American alone - 1,831 (0.2%)
* Other race alone - 2,068 (0.2%)


City B:
* Race 1 - 391,333 (49.5%)
* Race 2 - 277,721 (35.1%)
* Race 3 - 64,679 (8.2%)
* Race 4 - 42,644 (5.4%)
* Two or more races - 10,448 (1.3%)
* American alone - 1,636 (0.2%)
* Other race alone - 1,640 (0.2%)
* Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone - 491 (0.06%)

(data is from city-data web site)
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Old 03-01-2012, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Broomfield, CO
1,448 posts, read 1,703,609 times
Reputation: 851
Agreed. Central Austin is "liberal" by Texas standards. But considering Texas is among the most conservative, religious states in the country, that isn't saying much. Much of the marketing campaigns paint the entire Austin area is being "liberal" which simply isn't true. The VAST majority of metro Austin is heavily conservative where religion, and bible thumping are the norm. The only exceptions to that rule would be central Austin, downtown, and about a mile or so south of there.


Quote:
Originally Posted by supernaut112 View Post
Austin proper is still liberal. However, most people don't live in Austin proper, so they don't see it. When I use the term "Austin proper," this is what people living in the sprawl refer to as "Central Austin." It's what gives the metroplex its blue spot on the voting map.

But I will agree 100 percent that the sprawl is very conservative, and parts of it are scary conservative in the Bible Belt way. The part of Austin where my S.O. lives has so many churches, you can spit and hit ten. And Williamson Country is as provincial as areas come.

So if you don't live in Austin proper, it's almost guaranteed that you'll be in a very conservative area and view Austin as "conservative."
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Old 03-01-2012, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
460 posts, read 595,908 times
Reputation: 329
I don't know about 'vast majority' but perhaps that's just splitting hairs. Isn't Austin's city government predominantly liberal? If the vast majority of Austin were conservative, surely they would be electing more conservatives?
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Old 03-01-2012, 11:38 PM
 
Location: relocating
69 posts, read 90,139 times
Reputation: 28
Default Austin

Quote:
Originally Posted by sajae90 View Post

truncated

POSITIVES

*Safe (almost no violent crimes reported)
*Jobs (since I come from Detroit, I might appreciate this more...i mean, austin has felt the recession-hit as well, but not as much as other cities. In Detroit, there are virtually NO JOBS! In austin, you can find SOMETHING to do, even if it is not in your field and low paying

*Hard to make friends- like i stated before, this can be a cultural thing (with me being a full-bred Northerner), but if you aren't a college student (attending ACC or UT) and/or under 27 years old, you can find yourself out of the loop really fast.

Most of the people in Austin are really conservative.

Everyone kind of stick with those they already know or who looks, speak and act like them.

You might find some liberals downtown, but most of them are really young and drifters

*Allergies- I NEVER had allergies before I moved to Austin. Now, I get a sinus infection at least two times a year. What many people don't tell you (especially landlords), is that most of the apartment buildings/homes are infested with mold.

If you want to be around the "new" part of town, where there are many transplants, you should move to North Austin. I had a couple of associates who lived in North Austin and they were both from Detroit. South austin is country but very quite with a lot of landscape.
Thanks to many posters for the insights - Folks on the Pacific Coast are trying to escape the far left on the left coast, so Austin could be perfect for some of us. We are also looking for unemployment rates well under 10%, and median home prices under $200,000 However we are not looking for mold given the conditions of the coast. California and Oregon have serious problems and will take decades to recover.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquitaine View Post
I don't know about 'vast majority' but perhaps that's just splitting hairs. Isn't Austin's city government predominantly liberal? If the vast majority of Austin were conservative, surely they would be electing more conservatives?
My understanding is that Austin is the most liberal of the major metros in Texas. Is this correct ???
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Austin
773 posts, read 548,824 times
Reputation: 911
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquitaine View Post
I don't know about 'vast majority' but perhaps that's just splitting hairs. Isn't Austin's city government predominantly liberal? If the vast majority of Austin were conservative, surely they would be electing more conservatives?
The Austin City Council doesn't govern most of the sprawl. There's a separate governing entity for Round Rock, Lakeway, Cedar Park, Westlake, Rollingwood, etc., which is elected by the people living in those cities. These areas tend to be more conservative.
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Old 03-02-2012, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
460 posts, read 595,908 times
Reputation: 329
You still have a good amount of Sprawl within those borders from Circle C on up to the NW hills before you hit Cedar Park. Lakeway and Round Rock are convenient as nearby towns but I don't know that I'd call them Austin even if only for the simple reason that if you live there you don't put 'Austin, TX' in your address.

So I stand by 'Austin' being liberal: a large (overlarge) college town with a liberal government. But the moment you go outside, the climate changes!
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Old 03-02-2012, 06:15 AM
 
Location: SW Austin
206 posts, read 174,700 times
Reputation: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by atxcio View Post
The way the word "diversity" has become so perverted that people actually can use it to describe the exact opposite always amazes me.

Anyway, that's what happens when people claim Austin is "not diverse"... So please, if you are going to claim that, then just use another word to say what you really mean.

Here are the population distributions of two cities. Which do you think is typically called the more diverse city?

City A:
* Race 1 - 689,965 (75.7%)
* Race 2 - 120,891 (13.3%)
* Race 3 - 67,361 (7.4%)
* Race 4 - 15,184 (1.7%)
* Two or more races - 13,548 (1.5%)
* American alone - 1,831 (0.2%)
* Other race alone - 2,068 (0.2%)


City B:
* Race 1 - 391,333 (49.5%)
* Race 2 - 277,721 (35.1%)
* Race 3 - 64,679 (8.2%)
* Race 4 - 42,644 (5.4%)
* Two or more races - 10,448 (1.3%)
* American alone - 1,636 (0.2%)
* Other race alone - 1,640 (0.2%)
* Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone - 491 (0.06%)

(data is from city-data web site)

The first city is portland, and the second is Austin? Totally guessing here.
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