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Old 04-24-2012, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Broomfield, CO
1,448 posts, read 1,633,111 times
Reputation: 851
Most of my stats are from auto registration documents that were used at TxDOT to determine weight distributions on various bridges throughout the county. Much of this data was used as an estimate to how much weight a bridge could comfortably support (and the maximums it could withstand) The average weights of the vehicles driving along these bridges is critically important to it's infastructure. Clearly, TxDOT is not going to spend MORE money than it has to for what are already very pricey bridge contruction costs. These records are not public...i haven't worked at TXDOT for over 6 years, so the records aren't completely up to date...but has much really changed with people's buying habits since 2005?

And, on the chance you don't believe me, just drive a car around the area (especially suburbs) and see how many other vehicles are around you that don't require you to look up. Stand on a street corner and count cars, goto your local supermarket and look at vehicles in the parking lot.

My comments should not come as a surprise to anyone who leaves Texas on a normal basis (or goto North Dallas). Those that never leave, would probably never be able to tell a difference. Also, those that somehow believe that Austin is a "clean" city despite having some of the largest vehicles in the nation sitting in the worst traffic in the nation (for mid size metros)


Quote:
Originally Posted by buffettjr View Post
We all know he makes up his statistics and never links to sources. Just put his username on ignore and you will be so much happier! Although, you still see his comments in quoted replies unfortunately. (P.S., Eepstein I'm still waiting for your source on when the city of Austin was forcing people to not have Christmas lights on their houses because rich people didn't like the traffic).

As for the original discussion, if you're going to be spending any time in and around downtown, I think you'd be happier with a smaller car. They are easier to park, easier to maneuver, and get better gas mileage. If you live in the suburbs it probably doesn't matter as much, although then you will be driving a lot more so the mileage may be important.
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Old 04-24-2012, 03:44 PM
 
161 posts, read 184,771 times
Reputation: 271
2012 Mercedes C250 Sport.
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Old 04-24-2012, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
154 posts, read 139,560 times
Reputation: 131
2008 Toyota Yaris. Spectacular gas mileage.
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Old 04-24-2012, 07:27 PM
 
295 posts, read 323,447 times
Reputation: 379
`My 2000 Ford Excursion with the 6.8 V10 gas engine gets me a soild 10,pg in town, 14mpg on the highway, and a spectacular 7mpg when towing. Why would someone own one of these, especially when my other car is a 2002 Suburban? Because no other SUV out there can fit 8 people and all their luggage and tow an 8K pound RV. I love to fill up the 44 gallon fuel tank.
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Old 04-24-2012, 07:35 PM
 
156 posts, read 128,284 times
Reputation: 135
Chevy camaro, no kids, this car is perfect for me.
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Old 04-24-2012, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
11,900 posts, read 11,386,196 times
Reputation: 7140
Quote:
Originally Posted by eepstein View Post
Most of my stats are from auto registration documents that were used at TxDOT to determine weight distributions on various bridges throughout the county. Much of this data was used as an estimate to how much weight a bridge could comfortably support (and the maximums it could withstand) The average weights of the vehicles driving along these bridges is critically important to it's infastructure. Clearly, TxDOT is not going to spend MORE money than it has to for what are already very pricey bridge contruction costs. These records are not public...i haven't worked at TXDOT for over 6 years, so the records aren't completely up to date...but has much really changed with people's buying habits since 2005?

And, on the chance you don't believe me, just drive a car around the area (especially suburbs) and see how many other vehicles are around you that don't require you to look up. Stand on a street corner and count cars, goto your local supermarket and look at vehicles in the parking lot.

My comments should not come as a surprise to anyone who leaves Texas on a normal basis (or goto North Dallas). Those that never leave, would probably never be able to tell a difference. Also, those that somehow believe that Austin is a "clean" city despite having some of the largest vehicles in the nation sitting in the worst traffic in the nation (for mid size metros)
2005 data is 7 years old. My eyes tell me that although there are lots of pickup trucks and Tahoes, there are Prius everywhere. Austin was 10th among US cities in Prius sales (the data by city is no longer available). The city has ALWAYS been way more import friendly than other Texas cities. Just look at the dealers in this city. Multiple Honda, Toyota, and VW dealers for a long time. I see a Volt or two and a Leaf or two every day and I don't drive in central Austin.

I flat out do not find your posts on topics like this credible. Lots has changed in seven years. And compared to other cities, Austin has much in common with other outdoor oriented cities - lots of Subarus with mountain bike racks for example.

And your preoccupation with "high end" people should be satisfied with the many Maseratis, Bentleys, Lamborghinis and other high end cars in this city. I saw a Maybach yesterday on 360.
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Old 04-24-2012, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Lake Placid
264 posts, read 239,229 times
Reputation: 104
This is Texas, we all know everyone owns a 4x4 and lifted. If not that, Chevy Tahoe takes care of the family trips in town.....
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Old 04-25-2012, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Broomfield, CO
1,448 posts, read 1,633,111 times
Reputation: 851
Well I only have data from 2005, but like I said, I doubt that people have changed their buying habits much. You still see Tahoes and Suburbans literally flying off the new car lots. I never said there weren't any hybrids. Most of them are further into the central parts of Austin. Suburus?? Try Boulder colorado sir. Why would someone drive a subaru in Austin? It never snows, and hardly ever rains. Do they drive them to Colorado or New Mexico to go skiing?

Way more import friendly? What exactly does that mean? Sure, there are probably more imports in Austin than Waco or Temple, but certainly no different than Dallas or Houston. Again, try travelling out of Austin sometime and you could prove this fact to yourself.


Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
2005 data is 7 years old. My eyes tell me that although there are lots of pickup trucks and Tahoes, there are Prius everywhere. Austin was 10th among US cities in Prius sales (the data by city is no longer available). The city has ALWAYS been way more import friendly than other Texas cities. Just look at the dealers in this city. Multiple Honda, Toyota, and VW dealers for a long time. I see a Volt or two and a Leaf or two every day and I don't drive in central Austin.

I flat out do not find your posts on topics like this credible. Lots has changed in seven years. And compared to other cities, Austin has much in common with other outdoor oriented cities - lots of Subarus with mountain bike racks for example.

And your preoccupation with "high end" people should be satisfied with the many Maseratis, Bentleys, Lamborghinis and other high end cars in this city. I saw a Maybach yesterday on 360.
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Old 04-25-2012, 08:23 AM
 
492 posts, read 559,507 times
Reputation: 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by eepstein View Post
Most of my stats are from auto registration documents that were used at TxDOT to determine weight distributions on various bridges throughout the county. Much of this data was used as an estimate to how much weight a bridge could comfortably support (and the maximums it could withstand) The average weights of the vehicles driving along these bridges is critically important to it's infastructure. Clearly, TxDOT is not going to spend MORE money than it has to for what are already very pricey bridge contruction costs. These records are not public...i haven't worked at TXDOT for over 6 years, so the records aren't completely up to date...but has much really changed with people's buying habits since 2005?

And, on the chance you don't believe me, just drive a car around the area (especially suburbs) and see how many other vehicles are around you that don't require you to look up. Stand on a street corner and count cars, goto your local supermarket and look at vehicles in the parking lot.

My comments should not come as a surprise to anyone who leaves Texas on a normal basis (or goto North Dallas). Those that never leave, would probably never be able to tell a difference. Also, those that somehow believe that Austin is a "clean" city despite having some of the largest vehicles in the nation sitting in the worst traffic in the nation (for mid size metros)
All I heard was a lot of excuses and yet another failure to link to any data to back up your claims.
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Old 04-25-2012, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Volcano
10,862 posts, read 8,190,590 times
Reputation: 8478
Quote:
Originally Posted by eepstein View Post
Well I only have data from 2005, but like I said, I doubt that people have changed their buying habits much.
Honestly, I think that's why people keep hooting at your posts, because that is such a dinosaur perspective.

A LOT can change in 7 years, and a lot has, including the greatest financial downturn since the Great Depression, and wholesale shifts in the public's buying patterns due to the swift rise of the internet. Hundreds of new high-tech companies have been started here or moved to Austin, bringing in thousands of highly educated employees.

Downtown Austin is practically unrecognizable from what it was 7 years ago. Large numbers of people now live downtown, which totally alters the dynamics of downtown restaurants and bars and shops and traffic at night, etc. If you haven't been downtown in 7 years you could barely begin to describe it accurately today.

2005 data about almost anything may be interesting in a historical context, but it's pretty much irrelevant to conversations like this. It simply has zero cred today, which I think is why people keep giving you grief about posting it.
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