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Old 10-08-2007, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
8,625 posts, read 17,401,323 times
Reputation: 3454
Quote:
When I called and asked about the glass they told me that it is a public hazard if they dropped bottles when picking up the glass and they broke.
That is kind of funny...I guess it must be impossible for the glass to fall from the regular garbage and break .
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Old 10-08-2007, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Austin 'burbs
3,226 posts, read 9,698,822 times
Reputation: 692
At least they try... when we lived in a Hutto ETJ (And I don't know if it is like this for all of Hutto) they picked up our "recycling" and threw it in with the regular trash.... when a neighbor called they said they discontinued the service. Ummm... thanks for letting us know?
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Old 10-09-2007, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Hutto, Tx
8,624 posts, read 15,823,774 times
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That's not the way it is in this part of Hutto. But they do only pick up certain items. Things like glass and heavier you have to take to the center yourself.
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Old 10-09-2007, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Austin 'burbs
3,226 posts, read 9,698,822 times
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Well this was a timely post. We just got a new recycling bin - and there was this info in it... so here is the "official" Round Rock stance on glass...

(not my opinion, taken word for word from their handout - and I don't know why RR considers themselves the experts on this. I bet environmentalists everywhere could counter these arguements. Other cities and states seem to consider it worthwhile.)

Reasons for excluding glass from curbside recycling programs

- Glass breaks; broken glass contaminates all other recyclable; broken glass causes reccling equipment to wear down faster.
- Glass slows down productivity in Material Recovery Facilities (MRF's) which drives up the cost of recycling.
- Most injuries in recycling plants are caused by glass cuts.
- Glass is made from silica. Silica is the most common mineral on earth. Why are we trying to recycle something that is available everywhere? Glass has little to negative value.
- We should use our recycling systems to serve non-renewable resources like paper, plastic and metal, not sand (silica).
- Glass processing plants are mostly out of state. Silica processing plants are local.
- Glass is inert. It has not reactivity and produces no methane or leachate. This is the type of material that is best to landfill.

Last edited by jwb123; 10-09-2007 at 07:40 AM..
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Old 10-09-2007, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
8,625 posts, read 17,401,323 times
Reputation: 3454
Just a couple of comments:
Quote:
- Glass is made from silica. Silica is the most common mineral on earth. Why are we trying to recycle something that is available everywhere? Glass has little to negative value.
This is essentially true, but part of recycling is intended to keep things out of landfills, not just to prevent resources from being used.
Quote:
- Glass processing plants are mostly out of state. Silica processing plants are local.
This is not entirely true. There are several LARGE fiberglass facilities (e.g. Owens Corning and Saint-Gobain) in the state that use huge amounts of glass and also use recycled glass. I would guess that, yes, the silica is obtained locally, but that has nothing to do with recycling. There ARE consumers of recycled glass in the state. I have no idea on capacity balances (supply vs demand), though.
Quote:
- Glass is inert. It has not reactivity and produces no methane or leachate. This is the type of material that is best to landfill.
True, but one of the purposes of recycling is to save on landfill space. It may be the BEST to put in the landfill, but there is NO good thing to put in a landfill, if you think about it.
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Old 10-09-2007, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
264 posts, read 751,148 times
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Default Then we need to be pro-active...

Jenbar, yes, it is timely for me as well as I just got a magazine with a big article about recycling.
I do not think that you have to be a "tree hugger" to decide what is best, but I do believe that we have to be informed about what people think, wrong or not. Interesting to see the information about Round Rock points on recycling glass.
This is when you question your government. It is no good to just write in a forum anymore. I know, I must be getting ready to having this thread moved to politics, I am apologize.
But maybe the glass industry here in TX (or Austin and RR only, I don't know if it is the same in the whole state) needs to acknowledge (I am sure they now this) that recycling glass uses 50% less energy than manufacturing it from the virgin product. Of course, the real objective now is to reduce the use of anything that my end up in a landfill, like Trainwreck said.
As far as glass contaminating the process in the plants I think could be easily solved by having a separate container for it, wouldn't it?
Speaking of contamination, did you know that a plastic #3 could actually mess up the whole batch of plastics #1 and #2? Let's be real, do you thing that everybody reads their plastic containers before recycling them?
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Old 10-09-2007, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
8,625 posts, read 17,401,323 times
Reputation: 3454
I am guessing that Hutto contracts out their recycling to a private company that gets paid some small amount to collect recycle containers. I am also guessing that the contract was not very specific and the company only collects a) what it has to, and b) what it can make good money on. Glass was probably not 'required' in the contract.

To tell you the truth, private companies often do a better job (no matter how pathetic looking) than your local government could manage; however, I would think that glass should be a required item in the recycling list .

I have seen the stats for a lot of saving from recycling, but check who the source is...statistics can be bent both ways. Recycled glass takes less energy to melt, but they don't neccesarily consider the gas and energy requried to collect an sort the glass, etc. Not that I am disagreeing, just that it really isn't completely black and white. For me, the two biggest reasons to recycle glass are reduced mining (although it is pretty non-destructive) and reduced landfill use. Energy is probably a much closer to net zero than either
'side' will admit.
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Old 10-10-2007, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Austin 'burbs
3,226 posts, read 9,698,822 times
Reputation: 692
Hey guys, I'm not speaking in defense of RR! I was simply the speakerbox for their own literature. I think it's ridiculous not to recycle more. I loved our big (and I do mean huge) bin in WA that took everything... some areas in the Seattle suburbs even collect compostable food scraps once a week and provided a bin for that... I am totally on the pro-recycling side....
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Old 10-10-2007, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Hutto, Tx
8,624 posts, read 15,823,774 times
Reputation: 2313
I definitely wish they would pick up everything. It'd be a lot easier than driving all around town to do it. My neighbor spends the better part of one morning a week sorting plastic, glass, and cardboard and paper and loading some into her van and some into the bin, then has to drive to the recycle place and then go bin to bin there too.
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Old 10-10-2007, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
264 posts, read 751,148 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenbar View Post
Hey guys, I'm not speaking in defense of RR! I was simply the speakerbox for their own literature. I think it's ridiculous not to recycle more. I loved our big (and I do mean huge) bin in WA that took everything... some areas in the Seattle suburbs even collect compostable food scraps once a week and provided a bin for that... I am totally on the pro-recycling side....
I didn't think you were The criticism was directed towards those who wrote the "rules" and parameters for the recycling in RR.
Yes, it was nice to have the huge bin in WA, wasn't it. But we really filled it only around big holidays, so I am happy with the little green container they provide here, and for an extra $1 a month who can complain, right?
If you have access to a copy of the Co-op America Quarterly, they just wrote a very interesting article about this issue of recycling. I tried to find it online to post the link but it is not there.
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