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Old 08-18-2014, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
8,979 posts, read 16,380,336 times
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Good grief
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Old 08-18-2014, 02:25 PM
 
1,430 posts, read 2,217,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
go price walkable areas and un-walkable areas for yourself and compare like to like. Just as better school districts also command a premium over sub-par ones, so do more urban walkable places command a HUGE premium over completely auto-dependent areas. What you'll find, despite Steve's apparent dismissal is that uniformly and consistently, people pay a premium to live in walkable urban areas. That is not limited to Austin, we're not an aberration . . .this is pretty much universal;.

Wrong. People, buy and large, are buying a shorter commute.
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Old 08-18-2014, 02:39 PM
 
Location: home
1,235 posts, read 1,406,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gpurcell View Post
Wrong. People, buy and large, are buying a shorter commute.
So basically jobs create property value. For example, you wouldn't pay 300K to live in the middle of a flat desert with nothing to do - unless you had a high paying job, and they called the town "Midland". Not the best schools, nothing to do, isolated, but RE is through the roof.

Austin has that same paradox. There are really nice parts of town that are underpriced, and crappy parts of town that are overpriced, and it all boils down to the paychecks being offered in the immediate vicinity. Horrible traffic distorts this imbalance even further, as people are increasingly unwilling to live any distance from major employment centers.
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Old 08-18-2014, 10:09 PM
 
3,836 posts, read 5,411,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mayfair44 View Post
Is it "walkable" if you have few sidewalks, yet are close to many amenities?
As I stated - it's much much much more complex than "sidewalks"

Here's an excellent short presentation on what elements are required for walkability.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEkgM9P2C5U#t=415
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Old 08-19-2014, 12:37 AM
 
625 posts, read 1,065,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
As I stated - it's much much much more complex than "sidewalks"

Here's an excellent short presentation on what elements are required for walkability.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEkgM9P2C5U#t=415
If you recall, I'm the advocate who walks. Pitched that question to see what others thought.

I can appreciate the theory, however most of my walks don't include sidewalks, bc there are few. I'm more utilitarian in the value I put on proximity and abundance of trips I can comfortably make on foot or short bike ride. If the trip is made at least weekly or more, than its a premium. I'd argue that my "personal" walkscore is much higher than calculated, despite not having great sidewalks to use.

I've lived on the east coast, and can appreciate compactness and charm. My fav place was two blocks from here: https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0770...L3EEMQcNJA!2e0

Last edited by mayfair44; 08-19-2014 at 01:24 AM..
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Old 08-19-2014, 01:25 PM
 
547 posts, read 1,373,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sojourner77 View Post
Austin has that same paradox. There are really nice parts of town that are underpriced, and crappy parts of town that are overpriced, and it all boils down to the paychecks being offered in the immediate vicinity
Where are there nice parts of town that are under-priced in Austin!?
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Old 08-22-2014, 08:35 AM
 
Location: home
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buffettjr View Post
Where are there nice parts of town that are under-priced in Austin!?
The southern suburbs of Austin, Pflugerville (off 130), etc. A lot of the houses there are the same as other more expensive areas - same builders, same finishes, but there are no corporate employers in the immediate area, so these areas are disregarded when people are relocating for high-tech/white collar jobs - and the prices haven't risen as quickly because of it.

Here is a great example - this house would go for 2X anywhere else in Austin, but there are no high-paying employers in the area, so the paychecks aren't there to drive up the price:

http://www.redfin.com/TX/Austin/6512.../home/31031070

Before you mention schools or crime - It's a much better area than north lamar or metric blvd, but those areas have Apple, Samsung, etc driving up the prices, and this would be a 350K house in that area easily, even though those are worse neighborhoods.
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Old 08-22-2014, 08:44 AM
 
Location: SW Austin & Wimberley
6,329 posts, read 17,238,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sojourner77 View Post
The southern suburbs of Austin, Pflugerville (off 130), etc. A lot of the houses there are the same as other more expensive areas - same builders, same finishes, but there are no corporate employers in the immediate area, so these areas are disregarded when people are relocating for high-tech/white collar jobs - and the prices haven't risen as quickly because of it.

Here is a great example - this house would go for 2X anywhere else in Austin, but there are no high-paying employers in the area, so the paychecks aren't there to drive up the price:

http://www.redfin.com/TX/Austin/6512.../home/31031070

Before you mention schools or crime - It's a much better area than north lamar or metric blvd, but those areas have Apple, Samsung, etc driving up the prices, and this would be a 350K house in that area easily, even though those are worse neighborhoods.
It has nice finishouts, but 8ft ceilings throughout, siding on 3 sides instead of masonry. Seems like a KB home or other starter home.

That said, you're right in that it would pull a price of $350K-$375K in 78749. But I thik you underestimate the pricing downdraft of low ceilings and remote location. People don't want to live in the "sticks", as they perceive it, and if they do, they expect to pay way less.

Steve
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Old 08-22-2014, 09:07 AM
 
Location: home
1,235 posts, read 1,406,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austin-steve View Post
That said, you're right in that it would pull a price of $350K-$375K in 78749. But I thik you underestimate the pricing downdraft of low ceilings and remote location. People don't want to live in the "sticks", as they perceive it, and if they do, they expect to pay way less.

Steve
It's about the same distance to downtown as anything in 78749. This house is also not located next to AMD, Freescale, Intel, HP, Solarwinds, etc. like a house in 78749 would be. If those companies were to open an office next to the house I mentioned, it's value would shoot up practically overnight. It really boils down to the jobs available nearby, and everything else follows.

This is why traffic coming from the south is so bad, because most everyone in the south suburbs in a 300K+ house is supporting a mortgage with a job downtown. These people have to commute somewhere from 78748/78747/78652 and there are no corporate campuses nearby. The prices have risen dramatically around SPM over the last couple of years, along with the announcements of high-paying jobs relocating to downtown. I suspect the same is happening in Cedar Park with the announcements of high paying relocated jobs to the 183/Research Blvd area, causing horrible traffic on the 183.

Last edited by sojourner77; 08-22-2014 at 09:21 AM..
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Old 08-22-2014, 09:20 AM
 
2,602 posts, read 2,714,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sojourner77 View Post
on the 183.
the 183 ?
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