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Old 04-28-2015, 05:29 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,413 posts, read 37,797,914 times
Reputation: 22560

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ImOnFiya View Post
That statement is disrespectful of longtime Austinites. People should be able to express their concerns without being labeled. This is a city that has undergone major changes in infrastructure, economy, as well as population. Middle-class persons are being squeezed out of city center. Retirees are being forced to sell their homes because of property-taxes. Whole ethnic communities are being priced out of longtime, traditional neighborhoods (African-Americans, Hispanics) and out of Austin altogether. Just last week the City of Austin confirmed the rates of poverty are falling in the city because of the escalating price of rent and lack of available housing to SE Travis, Bastrop Counties or beyond. As a result, Austin is becoming less diverse, not more.


What makes a city is not infrastructure, it's people. I love Austin as much as the next person, but I am not blind to fact that we are seeing not just population displacement, but replacement. And that's worth talking about - without name calling.
EXCELLENT post. And the part I've bolded in red above is something that I see a lot of people losing sight of in their drive for more and more roads and tall buildings and their quest to make Austin a "big city" just like any other big city out there, the quest for the common denominator.

Don't move to a city, strive to make it over into your own image, and then call people names who have lived there forever and who object to you moving into their living room and remodeling without so much as a by your leave and no matter the consequences to the people who already live there. Just because YOU would be more comfortable with it that way.

Oh, and the traffic? Absolutely has not been that way "as long as any of us can remember". It's a relatively recent development in the overall scheme of things.

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Old 04-29-2015, 06:35 AM
 
126 posts, read 115,740 times
Reputation: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by alwaysmiling View Post
It's everyone's responsibility to take care of themselves. These issues have been discussed...

Don't protest density and then complain about affordability.

Don't move off of 620 and then complain about commute times to DT.

If your taxes are too high, cash out on your (assumably) highly appreciated property and downsize.

If you're priced out of the city center, it's been noted that you can't have a 4000 sqft new home walking distance to DT for 350k. Be 5-10 mins to city center or accept less square footage.

Not everyone can have everything. Its simply a balance, and there are options out there for every budget. The Mexican bakeries are still here. The graffiti is still here. The bands, the bars and old haunts while ever changing are still here. The traffic is still here (its been that way as long as any of us can remember). For every 1 person/place/thing/idea that disappears 2 take it's place. It's an evolutionary process that you embrace, and as the OP stated, it seems the attitude of this forum (and hopefully not the city as a whole) has become a negative, ranting, pitiful, unattractive, party is over, was better then, we hate outsiders, life sucks now, type of thing... People read these threads and make judgements about us Austinites. Read other city threads and then think about the way we're being perceived.
the graffiti? you mean the commissioned pieces? or the old school aztecs on the eastside if they havent been erased .. hmm is selena still around?

i moved to australia in 2012 so idk how much its changed since then, but i at least saw how it changed from the 80's to 2012. Those older than myself saw the changes from the 60-70s as well ...etc etc. Hmm the natives got screwed out of their land - so i guess nothing has change in a sense.

however, Its funny that a transplant (OP) who has only been in austin a couple of years wants to act like things havent changed for the worse in any way what so ever. its all based on perspective i suppose, some people just see progress while others see whatever they choose. its like me telling the aussies this and that about their country.. oh wait i dont..

austin has always sucked to a degree, but its always had its pros too. To me, the characters i knew growing up made austin enjoyable and "livable". Once you start watering its characters down to a bunch of try hards and them and those types..then aside from the students...you really only have a few different kinds of ppl living in austin...... sterile and generic .

what other things are worse??? eh, who cares...... it doesnt matter. I just know if i ever moved back to the USA, austin would no longer be my first choice, even though i have family and friends there and its my home away from oz.

its a free country though.. live where you want.

Last edited by bossh0g; 04-29-2015 at 07:03 AM..
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Austin
677 posts, read 491,760 times
Reputation: 916
Quote:
Originally Posted by bossh0g View Post
the graffiti? you mean the commissioned pieces? or the old school aztecs on the eastside if they havent been erased .. hmm is selena still around?

i moved to australia in 2012 so idk how much its changed since then, but i at least saw how it changed from the 80's to 2012. Those older than myself saw the changes from the 60-70s as well ...etc etc. Hmm the natives got screwed out of their land - so i guess nothing has change in a sense.

however, Its funny that a transplant (OP) who has only been in austin a couple of years wants to act like things havent changed for the worse in any way what so ever. its all based on perspective i suppose, some people just see progress while others see whatever they choose. its like me telling the aussies this and that about their country.. oh wait i dont..

austin has always sucked to a degree, but its always had its pros too. To me, the characters i knew growing up made austin enjoyable and "livable". Once you start watering its characters down to a bunch of try hards and them and those types..then aside from the students...you really only have a few different kinds of ppl living in austin...... sterile and generic .

what other things are worse??? eh, who cares...... it doesnt matter. I just know if i ever moved back to the USA, austin would no longer be my first choice, even though i have family and friends there and its my home away from oz.

its a free country though.. live where you want.
Once again though ... ALL CITIES CHANGE. Houston isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Dallas isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Portland isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Detroit isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. San Francisco isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Yet all of these cities do retain unique, identifiable characteristics and personalities. But they all are changing. Some are growing, some are dieing. But all are changing.

People who pick out a specific time frame, and desire things to never change from that point will NEVER be happy. You will just either keep complaining, or else move to the next city that at this point in time you think offers you what you want, and then in 10, 20, 30 years whine and complain when that city "lost what it once had" for you.
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Jollyville, TX
3,850 posts, read 9,438,969 times
Reputation: 4392
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddATX View Post
Once again though ... ALL CITIES CHANGE. Houston isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Dallas isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Portland isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Detroit isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. San Francisco isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Yet all of these cities do retain unique, identifiable characteristics and personalities. But they all are changing. Some are growing, some are dieing. But all are changing.

People who pick out a specific time frame, and desire things to never change from that point will NEVER be happy. You will just either keep complaining, or else move to the next city that at this point in time you think offers you what you want, and then in 10, 20, 30 years whine and complain when that city "lost what it once had" for you.
I moved to Houston in 1977. The population of Houston then was roughly the population of the Austin metro area now. If a city doesn't change, or is in decline, it's probably not a great place to live.
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Austin
677 posts, read 491,760 times
Reputation: 916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonlady View Post
I moved to Houston in 1977. The population of Houston then was roughly the population of the Austin metro area now. If a city doesn't change, or is in decline, it's probably not a great place to live.
Yep ... I moved to Houston in 1980, and with the exception of a couple of years, it was home until 2010. My sons and my granddaughter, as well as my parents and sisters, and a few nieces and nephews still live there so I'm back there all the time. And it has changed ALOT. Still has it's same unique character, but some great old places are gone, some really unique spots lost, but other new and exciting places have sprung up, and still the city retains its unique identity.
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:31 AM
 
Location: East TX
2,090 posts, read 2,030,868 times
Reputation: 3189
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
EXCELLENT post. And the part I've bolded in red above is something that I see a lot of people losing sight of in their drive for more and more roads and tall buildings and their quest to make Austin a "big city" just like any other big city out there, the quest for the common denominator.

Don't move to a city, strive to make it over into your own image, and then call people names who have lived there forever and who object to you moving into their living room and remodeling without so much as a by your leave and no matter the consequences to the people who already live there. Just because YOU would be more comfortable with it that way.

Oh, and the traffic? Absolutely has not been that way "as long as any of us can remember". It's a relatively recent development in the overall scheme of things.
Perhaps many of us are not striving to make it into our own image, but are here strictly because of the growth. Us Census data from March 2013 shows Texas employs over 277,000 people full time, and another 88,000 part time employees. Much of the state government is based here in Austin. As Texas grows, so will Austin, by default. As Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio grow, so will Austin. So perhaps the reality isn't that we all want to turn Austin into another mega-city, but the growth of the other large metro areas will continue to drive growth here.

Much of what I love about where I came from cannot and will not ever be duplicated here, and a large metro area is not what I want. It is unfortunately a necessity since where I came from has deteriorated into a professional abyss with little hope of a professional future, retirement, or putting my kids through college. So rather than rail against the existing citizenry, I choose to respect the culture and history of a great place, and at the same time, welcome the fact that it has a future. It isn't better or worse than where we were, but it is different. I tell my family we need to embrace the differences and enjoy something new.
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:34 AM
 
126 posts, read 115,740 times
Reputation: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddATX View Post
Once again though ... ALL CITIES CHANGE. Houston isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Dallas isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Portland isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Detroit isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. San Francisco isn't what it was 20-30 years ago. Yet all of these cities do retain unique, identifiable characteristics and personalities. But they all are changing. Some are growing, some are dieing. But all are changing.

People who pick out a specific time frame, and desire things to never change from that point will NEVER be happy. You will just either keep complaining, or else move to the next city that at this point in time you think offers you what you want, and then in 10, 20, 30 years whine and complain when that city "lost what it once had" for you.
yup i agree.. things change.. while its not unique, natives in austin being displaced by a foreign body is a characteristic that is easily identifiable. AND the personalities of the affected reflect the ghosts of those who have come before them.

ppl should just be happy austin has growth, jobs and opportunity. if something is lost, find it. BE IT.

Just dont be that 2nd year transplant telling me things havent change in negative ways as well. The negative could just be that the OP moved to Austin and f 'ed it up everyone right. at least wait til year 3
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,763 posts, read 2,158,706 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
What makes a city is not infrastructure, it's people.
Sure, but when its people refuse to make any infrastructure, they're making their own bed...which is exactly what's happened.

I don't begrudge folks who miss the Austin of the 90s (or even the early 2000s) but the NIMBY and pseudo-environmentalists who think 'if they don't build it, they won't come' because two more lanes of highway are going to destroy their beautiful hill country - well, those folks complaining about the traffic is pretty hilarious. They're actually complaining about the other people...as in, 'we don't want you to live here and we tried to stop you from coming.'

I get not wanting a high rise in view of the hill country, or thinking it's a shame that we need highways in places that used to be untouched, but I can't come around to the view that it's such a terrible thing without embracing a certain kind of elitism that says 'this is just for me,' because when folks show up by the thousands to live and work in 'your' city, you can choose to accommodate them, or not.

Austin has (finally) come around to trying to accommodate them, but over the cries of your TexasHorseLadys who are afraid that 'more people' means 'common denominator,' as if the thing that makes Austin special is just that not a lot of people live here. I can empathize with that view: I liked my own neighborhood better three years ago, and it wasn't even small then; but it's that much more crowded now, and that certainly dampens my enjoyment of it. But who am I to tell all these people they shouldn't live here? Or that the cost of living here is sitting at the intersection of Slaughter and Mopac for 10 minutes each way? What is you alternative suggestion for getting all these folks where they need to go?

"Preserve things how they were" is a recipe for San Francisco-scale housing prices and disaster. We already have enough of that pressure here (see also: 11% rise in appraised value).
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:45 AM
 
Location: The People's Republic of Austin
5,184 posts, read 5,738,392 times
Reputation: 2553
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rynldsbr View Post
... I choose to respect the culture and history of a great place, and at the same time, welcome the fact that it has a future. It isn't better or worse than where we were, but it is different. I tell my family we need to embrace the differences and enjoy something new.
Folks like you are always welcome here -- or anywhere for that matter.

I've lived all over, and never once felt the need to point out how any place could be better if they just changed one thing. Because implied in that observation is an unavoidable criticism. If you don't think so, try it on your spouse/significant other and let us know how it was received. And so, I was raised that you just don't go to another man's town and tell him what is wrong with it. It will always be received badly -- and you will be viewed as rude.

Now, I will accept there are some people moving here that weren't raised with those Texas values. But when you come here, and make those observations, with their implied criticism, don't expect many of us to take it well.
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:58 AM
 
1,198 posts, read 961,426 times
Reputation: 1499
Austin sucks these days. It's like someone took Portland or Seattle and stuck them in the middle of Texas. It's crawling with hipsters. Everything from their stupid fixie bike culture to those [mod cut]glasses they all wear has turned Austin into a carbon copy city.

There is nothing original about Austin anymore. I blame the Internet. Back in the day, there were huge differences between different parts of the country. Going from San Francisco to Chicago was like going to different countries. Now days it's not really like that, as you will see the same stupid people drinking $5 coffees while staring at their smart phones all day in any city that's not completely hood. Austin is a perfect example of this, as it used to still have somewhat of a Texas feel to it..............Not so much anymore.

Last edited by RonnieinDallas; 04-29-2015 at 07:02 PM.. Reason: Language
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