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Old 10-25-2017, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,816 posts, read 40,114,069 times
Reputation: 24364

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
Whoever told you that traffic wasn't "that bad" in the 90's misinformed you.

Heavy traffic and traffic congestion has always been one of the top 3 main issues in Austin since at least the mid 70's. They are always building new roads or working to improve the roads we already got.

Houston, Dallas-Ft Worth, San Antonio and Austin have been in constant boom mode pretty much since the invention of the automobile and indoor air conditioning. People have been moving here quicker than they can build the roads, and it doesn't look like that's gonna change anytime soon.

I do believe since at least the mid 1970's the state has been constantly working somewhere along Interstate 35 between San Antonio and DFW. I doubt that 278 mile stretch of interstate has ever been totally free of road construction or road work for at least 40 years, and probably closer to 50.

I suppose there will come a day when Dallas to San Antonio along Interstate 35 will be 100% urban.
Well, I lived in Austin from 1969 through the early 1990's and it wasn't that bad. When I worked near Mopac/Rollingwood and lived near Burnet/Duval/Cameron, it was an easy commute even dropping off our daughter at daycare off 290. When we lived near Ben White/South Lamar and my husband's business was at Burnet/Rutland, it took him 20 minutes at rush hour to get to work (that was from about 1988 to 1996. I don't remember traffic being a major issue during all that time.

Now, I35 is another matter. Since the first time I rode on I35 (I was too young to drive and it was in the process of being built - that would have been about the mid-1950's) to today, there has been construction on I35 continuously but not continuously in Austin - Temple seems to have the honor of most continuous construction based on my 60 years of traveling that road.
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Old 10-25-2017, 04:40 PM
 
1,429 posts, read 1,928,249 times
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I am a former Austinite who left a year ago after thirty plus years of living there. I come back here on occasion because a little piece of my heart still resides there - many fond memories. Was just there for a week and got stuck on Mopac for 45 min on a weekday at 2p. Went to Central Market and observed a woman in a Rolls Royce honking at someone because they didn't get out of the way fast enough for her. Then a visit back to our hood and several more really large houses replacing the previously "affordable" bungalows. Leaving was tough but now confirming it was probably a good move for us, too.
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Old 10-25-2017, 05:06 PM
 
Location: NM
462 posts, read 913,519 times
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It's interesting to me to hear how this person likes the new place he just moved to. I'm familiar with CO Springs, Denver, etc. as I used to live there; I'm also familiar with Austin (more like it used to be in the 80s).

The only things I'll have to say about Denver is that it's a great town, lots to do and see; however, I thought that the traffic in Denver on I-25, etc. was awful in the 1990s (I can just imagine how it is now!). The winter will be real winter up there....snow and more snow, cold; but the mountains are pretty gorgeous and the downhill skiing is great just about 70 miles away (if that).

The OP has a right to compare the two cities. Both have good things and bad things..... depends on one's preferences and perspective.
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Old 10-25-2017, 07:02 PM
 
Location: 78745
3,709 posts, read 2,854,762 times
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There are probably close to 3 or 4 times as many people in Austin city limits and in Austin metro today as there was in the late 70's and early 80's, but it seems just as congested back then as it does today because there were alot fewer lanes back then and there were alot fewer roads as there is now.

Not counting the frontage road lanes, Interstate 35 thru Austin was pretty much 2 lanes in both directions, except thru downtown and where it's double decked by UT. Mopac was not complete. There was no Capital of Texas Highway. 183 and Ben White had stop lights and the traffic would back up during rush hour. It could take close to 30 to 40 minutes to get from 183 and 35 to Anderson Mill Road during rush hour. Anderson Mill Road was a crooked little country road between 183 and 620 and on out to Volente. Streets like Lamar and Burnet Road are wider now. At the time, Burnet Road and 183 was the busiest intersection in Austin. I can well remember several times waiting thru 3 and 4 stop lights to get thru the light at 183 and Burnet Road intersection.

Lamar and 38th Street seems extremely congested and hectic, to me. But the traffic moves right along

Parmer Lane, Metric, Braker Lane, Howard Lane in North Austin, are now major thoroughfares when in the early 80's they were just barely skinny 2 lane roads.

290 in Oak Hill could be a nightmare before it was a freeway going into Austin. Now there are more people out that way heading into Austin and it still can be a nightmare until you get to the freeway, just past Wm Cannon.

Wm Cannon is 3 lanes from 35 to Oak Hill, except for the stretch between Bodie and Manchaca.

I think Austin is just congested now as it was back then, but as Austin is now and as it was then, as long as there are no wrecks, the traffic around Austin moves along fairly good, even during rush hour. It may be slow and go for several miles, but at least the traffic is moving. As long as the traffic is moving, it don't seem so bad, but that's just me. If there's a wreck on the highway and traffic comes to a complete halt, that's when I get frustrated, especially if it looks like I'm going to be late for an appointment. But it's nobody's fault but mine, for not leaving earlier in anticipation of a possible traffic jam that could cause me to be late.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
Well, I lived in Austin from 1969 through the early 1990's and it wasn't that bad. When I worked near Mopac/Rollingwood and lived near Burnet/Duval/Cameron, it was an easy commute even dropping off our daughter at daycare off 290. When we lived near Ben White/South Lamar and my husband's business was at Burnet/Rutland, it took him 20 minutes at rush hour to get to work (that was from about 1988 to 1996. I don't remember traffic being a major issue during all that time.

Now, I35 is another matter. Since the first time I rode on I35 (I was too young to drive and it was in the process of being built - that would have been about the mid-1950's) to today, there has been construction on I35 continuously but not continuously in Austin - Temple seems to have the honor of most continuous construction based on my 60 years of traveling that road.
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Old 10-25-2017, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,816 posts, read 40,114,069 times
Reputation: 24364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
There are probably close to 3 or 4 times as many people in Austin city limits and in Austin metro today as there was in the late 70's and early 80's, but it seems just as congested back then as it does today because there were alot fewer lanes back then and there were alot fewer roads as there is now.

Not counting the frontage road lanes, Interstate 35 thru Austin was pretty much 2 lanes in both directions, except thru downtown and where it's double decked by UT. Mopac was not complete. There was no Capital of Texas Highway. 183 and Ben White had stop lights and the traffic would back up during rush hour. It could take close to 30 to 40 minutes to get from 183 and 35 to Anderson Mill Road during rush hour. Anderson Mill Road was a crooked little country road between 183 and 620 and on out to Volente. Streets like Lamar and Burnet Road are wider now. At the time, Burnet Road and 183 was the busiest intersection in Austin. I can well remember several times waiting thru 3 and 4 stop lights to get thru the light at 183 and Burnet Road intersection.

Lamar and 38th Street seems extremely congested and hectic, to me. But the traffic moves right along

Parmer Lane, Metric, Braker Lane, Howard Lane in North Austin, are now major thoroughfares when in the early 80's they were just barely skinny 2 lane roads.

290 in Oak Hill could be a nightmare before it was a freeway going into Austin. Now there are more people out that way heading into Austin and it still can be a nightmare until you get to the freeway, just past Wm Cannon.

Wm Cannon is 3 lanes from 35 to Oak Hill, except for the stretch between Bodie and Manchaca.

I think Austin is just congested now as it was back then, but as Austin is now and as it was then, as long as there are no wrecks, the traffic around Austin moves along fairly good, even during rush hour. It may be slow and go for several miles, but at least the traffic is moving. As long as the traffic is moving, it don't seem so bad, but that's just me. If there's a wreck on the highway and traffic comes to a complete halt, that's when I get frustrated, especially if it looks like I'm going to be late for an appointment. But it's nobody's fault but mine, for not leaving earlier in anticipation of a possible traffic jam that could cause me to be late.
Interesting you should say that - we lived in South Austin at the time, my daughter attended the Waldorf School, so I took that route both ways twice a day. Certainly wasn't a nightmare when I was on it. Took me 20 minutes each way, like clockwork.
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Old 10-25-2017, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
12,065 posts, read 10,983,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northanna_2001 View Post
It's interesting to me to hear how this person likes the new place he just moved to. I'm familiar with CO Springs, Denver, etc. as I used to live there; I'm also familiar with Austin (more like it used to be in the 80s).

The only things I'll have to say about Denver is that it's a great town, lots to do and see; however, I thought that the traffic in Denver on I-25, etc. was awful in the 1990s (I can just imagine how it is now!). The winter will be real winter up there....snow and more snow, cold; but the mountains are pretty gorgeous and the downhill skiing is great just about 70 miles away (if that).

The OP has a right to compare the two cities. Both have good things and bad things..... depends on one's preferences and perspective.
I get you with the traffic in the mid 90's. I used to have to travel to Denver on business a lot and had to travel down to Englewood. It was horrible from DIA down I-25 and the E470 tollway hadn't been built.

Now, however, you can take E470 and it is very fast, if costly. However, since the only time I'm in Denver is on business, I simply just expense the toll.

Colorado Springs is in every way much better than Denver. The main thing that Denver offers that CO Springs doesn't is pro sports and you can simply drive the 1 hour drive.
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Old 10-25-2017, 10:20 PM
 
7,117 posts, read 12,582,930 times
Reputation: 3689
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northanna_2001 View Post
It's interesting to me to hear how this person likes the new place he just moved to. I'm familiar with CO Springs, Denver, etc. as I used to live there; I'm also familiar with Austin (more like it used to be in the 80s).

The only things I'll have to say about Denver is that it's a great town, lots to do and see; however, I thought that the traffic in Denver on I-25, etc. was awful in the 1990s (I can just imagine how it is now!). The winter will be real winter up there....snow and more snow, cold; but the mountains are pretty gorgeous and the downhill skiing is great just about 70 miles away (if that).

The OP has a right to compare the two cities. Both have good things and bad things..... depends on one's preferences and perspective.
how dare you bring the conversation back on topic
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Old 10-26-2017, 12:03 AM
 
403 posts, read 622,393 times
Reputation: 683
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Colorado Springs is in every way much better than Denver.
this is of course leading to a difference conversation, and I would disagree. I will say that mountains are epic in COS, and the Garden of the Gods is something everybody should visit at least 1x. But the culture there is ultra gnarly right/military/evangelical, which is not my thing. and lots of drifters/sketchy areas all over. North COS is hot right now and has some nice areas. But man its booooring

What still baffles me is that my ex co-workers commute from like.. Roundrock to South Austin. One did it from Georgetown. Even if they hit the road at 6am and maybe get an advantage coming south, going home before 7pm must be brutal. I did Grand/i35 to Lamar/183 for a month in 2013. it wasn't terrible like Slaughter and Ni35 frontage, but of course it was a schlep. but last year i worked on South Congress and it was tough. Magnolia cafe is always packed... the Torchies down there was slammed every single day for lunch. making mad $. That HEB on Soco and Oltorf.. congestion wise, was 10/10.
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Old 10-26-2017, 07:02 AM
 
2,097 posts, read 1,525,272 times
Reputation: 3624
Quote:
Originally Posted by orngkat View Post
I am a former Austinite who left a year ago after thirty plus years of living there. I come back here on occasion because a little piece of my heart still resides there - many fond memories. Was just there for a week and got stuck on Mopac for 45 min on a weekday at 2p. Went to Central Market and observed a woman in a Rolls Royce honking at someone because they didn't get out of the way fast enough for her. Then a visit back to our hood and several more really large houses replacing the previously "affordable" bungalows. Leaving was tough but now confirming it was probably a good move for us, too.
I think that sums it up pretty well.

All I know is my average little starter home I lived in, in Cat Hallow,...... so we aren't even talking Austin...... is now pushing $300K. That's wrong and approaching West Coast levels.
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Old 10-26-2017, 08:21 AM
 
1,053 posts, read 1,413,538 times
Reputation: 1322
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trainwreck20 View Post
My relatives up north (MN) snowmobile, xcountry ski, ice fish, and hike pretty much all winter. And it is a damn-sight colder up there than CO. It is all about what you would rather deal with. I know people that won't grill/picnic in the summer when it is 100+ degrees. And many sports are not doable in the heat of summer unless you are young and/or in peak shape, or only for short periods of time per day. You can dress warmer in the winter, but you can only dress so much cooler in the summer.

The weather in Denver is not really that extreme. The coldest months (Dec-Feb), the average high is in the mid 40s. Average, of course, so there are some warmer and cooler days. A day with a high in the 50s is not uncommon for the winter, and occasionally in the 60s. That allows for some nice days mixed in throughout the winter. In Texas, you can go three months and never have a high below 95.

Anyway, to each their own. I actually deal with the heat better myself, but just know to many people that the reverse is true.

And hasn't someone told you a million time to dress in layers?

Agreed with all of this.

Consider this: on any given winter day MPLS has MORE bicycle commuters than Austin. They have bike highways with snowplows! I biked through a MPLS winter (and through plenty of Austin summers). I found both to be a challenge, but also invigorating. Mind over matter is what I've experienced regarding weather. When I lived in the pacific NW, the rain sure didn't stop anyone from going about their lives.

Y'all should welcome this kind of thread. Austin could use a reduction in population to raise its quality of life back up to where it was previously.
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