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Old 05-21-2008, 11:19 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
485 posts, read 1,309,779 times
Reputation: 132

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
If both of your neighbors have Bermuda and you get St. Augustine..you will see Bermuda creep onto your property.
That's exactly what I was going to say. The Bermuda is invasive.
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Old 05-23-2008, 12:56 AM
 
2,285 posts, read 2,718,236 times
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Aren't there other grasses that require less water/care? Although I don't remember the name, I think I remember someone talking about a native grass that doesn't need to be cut. Was that a dream?
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Old 05-23-2008, 01:00 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
75,022 posts, read 35,751,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G Grasshopper View Post
Aren't there other grasses that require less water/care? Although I don't remember the name, I think I remember someone talking about a native grass that doesn't need to be cut. Was that a dream?
That would be Buffalo grass.
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Old 05-23-2008, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
5,317 posts, read 6,466,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
That would be Buffalo grass.
I've heard about the Buffalo grass for 'non-lawn' type applications such as office and retail spaces but I wonder how it looks/feels as a yard grass. Our El Toro Zoysia held up well during the hot dry Atlanta summer last year. It is very invasive, however, and must be edged regularly. I guess there really is no 'free lunch'.
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Old 05-23-2008, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
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There was a lawn once in front of a beautiful 1800's house down on 9th and West Avenue, I believe it was, that was lovely. Rarely needed cutting, did go dormant in the winter which was just fine, it was a nice golden brown color when dormant. And soft to walk on, as well.
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Old 05-24-2008, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
485 posts, read 1,309,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
That would be Buffalo grass.
You don't want to do buffalo grass if you want a nice lawn. Friends have it and it goes brown, isn't good at getting trampled and the root weave isn't tight enough to keep the weeds out. I always thought their lawn looked unkempt.
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Old 05-24-2008, 06:08 PM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
18,391 posts, read 17,102,820 times
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In TX, Bermuda is an overall better grass cause it takes our TX heat much better and requires less water. It does not do well in shade so that's where you'll want St Augustine. SA requires a whole lot more water so nowadays it's not that great as an overall yard cover.

SA is more susceptible to disease also and if I recall can be damaged by very cold weather. Everything I've read Buffalo Grass is not that great unless you are living in the deserts of west TX.
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Old 05-24-2008, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
16,411 posts, read 22,669,093 times
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One thing you want to remember is that you don't really want a green lawn in the winter. People will just assume that you're doing some environmental no-no to keep it green and why on earth would you?

In Austin, it's not necessary (or even necessarily desirable) to have a green lawn all year round. And there are watering restrictions that go into effect when we have one of our droughts - keep that in mind when choosing landscaping plants, including grass. The less water something requires, the better, around here.

We tried buffalo grass when we lived in Austin (it was only available by seed then, not sod, which no doubt made a difference). We did several parts of our lawn in different grasses and saw which one worked best. Ended up choosing zoysia, which worked beautifully in both our shaded and sunny areas. Then we moved and rented out the house for about a decade, during which time the lawn got a lot of abuse and neglect. When we took it back from the property management company and decided to get the lawn back in shape, the zoysia was what had not only survived, but thrived. In the middle of a drought, just the tiniest bit of water and it greened right up and came right back. Amazing stuff.
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