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Old 07-13-2008, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
369 posts, read 1,600,887 times
Reputation: 163

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Well, I'm glad someone posted this, as it confirms what I was 99.99998% certain of, before...that being a commute from Johnson City just ain't gonna happen without me losing my mind.

I've done a 60+ minute commute, each way, once in my life, and I don't want to relive it. There are places where you'll do this, believe it or not. In my case, it was to live at 9K feet of elevation in Park county, CO, (where South Park isn't so much comedy, but more like a docu-comedy), so we could have a copule of acres, a nice house, feet of snow in the winter, and a family of deer bedding down in the yard every spring.
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Old 07-13-2008, 07:12 PM
 
3 posts, read 10,976 times
Reputation: 10
Default Thanks to everyone for their input...

Thank you to everyone for your feedback and input on my original post. Just to clarify our position, we love the community feel of Dripping Springs and the access to hill country. We currently live on a few acres and are looking to transition to a larger development with more young families (18 month old and 3 week old).

Based on the responses that I've seen we may not be able to get everything we want such as a small community feel, close to hill country, development full of young families and close to my work. I am an early riser, usually in before 7am, so I thought that would help beat the traffic. We will begin to explore a few of the other developments other posters mentioned.

Once again, thank you for all the responses, you have been a tremendous help.
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Old 07-14-2008, 08:56 AM
 
147 posts, read 497,892 times
Reputation: 55
I live in Belterra and I work around I-35 and Rundberg. I leave the house at 5:45, it takes about 30 minutes to get to work. Coming back at 3:00 or 3:30 it takes about 35 to 40 minutes.

If you can get in and out early you'll be OK.
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Old 09-30-2008, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Drippin Springs
5 posts, read 19,228 times
Reputation: 12
Question Commute to Mopac and 183

I'm slightly confused, why would anyone go through the 'Y' when you could go
Darden Hill Rd., to 1826 to 45 which turns into Loop 1/Mopac and fly up to
183????? It takes me 30 minutes to get north, more if I get entangled with
rush hour.
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Old 10-09-2008, 05:43 PM
 
2 posts, read 5,644 times
Reputation: 12
Seriously? If you're going to commute (time+money+wear on car) then why move to another subdivision? Your house butted up against another house... sounds just like Any-Place, USA.

I don't live in a subdivision in D.S., I live on 20+ acres with my hubby, daughter, 3 dogs, 30+ chickens, donkey and 2 (good-for-nothing) goats. I have a fantastic vegetable garden and a peach orchard. We are working towards alternative energy sources and living off the grid (except our beloved wireless internet service, of course!). (No, we're not hippies, we just love living this way.) However, I do have a 9-5/M-F job as a VOIP Engineer and my commute is over an hour one way (hubby works as a software engineer in town).

We would never move, though. Hubby and I sometimes carpool into Austin, but we love where we live! The green drive home through the hills is (nearly) free therapy for staring at a monitor for 40+ hrs a week and for all the bovine excrement we put up with at work. It's perfection! No one tells us what color we can paint our house and barn (not that it's some strange color, but we could paint it purple if we wanted to). No one tells us what we can and can't do on or to our own property (no nasty letters from the Subdivision Nazis after a heavy rain ordering us to cut our still wet grass). And we don't have to put up with inconsiderate neighbors blasting some horrific Christian Rock or country music through our windows while their ill mannered offspring invade our property ("Hey you kids! Get off my lawn!").

Daughter is in the high school and this school is of a higher standard than most anywhere. If your child is not used to doing homework and studying, he/she WILL fail (something) the first semester. But give him/her some support and keep in touch with the teachers and things will go smoother for your kid after they learn that this school isn't so tolerant of slackers. (Oh, and Mr. Raimond is a horrible math teacher... have your kid moved if he/she gets him for any math class whatsoever.) One unfortunate addition to the curriculum this year is an offensive Christian Bible Class (we're not Christians) that my tax dollars are paying for. Hello? Isn't that what Church Sunday School is for? (Any lawyers out there want to make a few bucks?!?)

To answer your question about commuting... from HighPointe/Belterra. My suggestion is to alter your work schedule to leave very early or very late (depending on how much time you want with your family when you get home). I live north and west of the town of D.S. and with no traffic I get to I-35/183 in 45 minutes without traffic, and worst traffic scenario: 1:15 hrs.
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Old 10-09-2008, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Dripping Springs , TX
786 posts, read 2,442,214 times
Reputation: 236
X-Valkyrie

Interesting comments about DSHS. My daughter just transferred in as a sophomore and has Mr Raimond for Geometry. We are going through the homework/studying thing right now but she is holding up alright.

Love the hill country views and the friendly people. Friday night high school football is something we did not have back in Canada. Its starting to become a regular thing for us.
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Old 10-09-2008, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, AUSTINtx
3,566 posts, read 5,291,087 times
Reputation: 2192
Quote:
Originally Posted by X-Valkyrie View Post
Seriously? If you're going to commute (time+money+wear on car) then why move to another subdivision? Your house butted up against another house... sounds just like Any-Place, USA.

I don't live in a subdivision in D.S., I live on 20+ acres with my hubby, daughter, 3 dogs, 30+ chickens, donkey and 2 (good-for-nothing) goats. I have a fantastic vegetable garden and a peach orchard. We are working towards alternative energy sources and living off the grid (except our beloved wireless internet service, of course!). (No, we're not hippies, we just love living this way.) However, I do have a 9-5/M-F job as a VOIP Engineer and my commute is over an hour one way (hubby works as a software engineer in town).

We would never move, though. Hubby and I sometimes carpool into Austin, but we love where we live! The green drive home through the hills is (nearly) free therapy for staring at a monitor for 40+ hrs a week and for all the bovine excrement we put up with at work. It's perfection! No one tells us what color we can paint our house and barn (not that it's some strange color, but we could paint it purple if we wanted to). No one tells us what we can and can't do on or to our own property (no nasty letters from the Subdivision Nazis after a heavy rain ordering us to cut our still wet grass). And we don't have to put up with inconsiderate neighbors blasting some horrific Christian Rock or country music through our windows while their ill mannered offspring invade our property ("Hey you kids! Get off my lawn!").

Daughter is in the high school and this school is of a higher standard than most anywhere. If your child is not used to doing homework and studying, he/she WILL fail (something) the first semester. But give him/her some support and keep in touch with the teachers and things will go smoother for your kid after they learn that this school isn't so tolerant of slackers. (Oh, and Mr. Raimond is a horrible math teacher... have your kid moved if he/she gets him for any math class whatsoever.) One unfortunate addition to the curriculum this year is an offensive Christian Bible Class (we're not Christians) that my tax dollars are paying for. Hello? Isn't that what Church Sunday School is for? (Any lawyers out there want to make a few bucks?!?)

To answer your question about commuting... from HighPointe/Belterra. My suggestion is to alter your work schedule to leave very early or very late (depending on how much time you want with your family when you get home). I live north and west of the town of D.S. and with no traffic I get to I-35/183 in 45 minutes without traffic, and worst traffic scenario: 1:15 hrs.
The problem is that if every family had 20 acres of land you would have to spend a lot more than an hour to get to work because of the lack of density. I also don't think the vehicles you have to take such long distances to work are "off the grid" so your overall energy savings are nullified. My mom (1500 sq. ft. home on 10 acres) lives in rural Virginia and she's paying on the order of $3500-4000/year for home heating oil while I'm (1,100 sq. ft. home) paying less than a $1k for heating/AC with the slightly more expensive wind energy program. I'm also really, really skeptical of people who have anecdotal evidence that their school district is so much better than neighboring school districts. Show me some hard proof. Sorry for the cynicism but there are many sides to the rural vs. urban debate............
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:08 AM
 
1,151 posts, read 2,668,547 times
Reputation: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by verybadgnome View Post
The problem is that if every family had 20 acres of land you would have to spend a lot more than an hour to get to work because of the lack of density. I also don't think the vehicles you have to take such long distances to work are "off the grid" so your overall energy savings are nullified. My mom (1500 sq. ft. home on 10 acres) lives in rural Virginia and she's paying on the order of $3500-4000/year for home heating oil while I'm (1,100 sq. ft. home) paying less than a $1k for heating/AC with the slightly more expensive wind energy program. I'm also really, really skeptical of people who have anecdotal evidence that their school district is so much better than neighboring school districts. Show me some hard proof. Sorry for the cynicism but there are many sides to the rural vs. urban debate............
... One side of which is that wind energy could never, with current technology, ever come close to supporting us. I'm not sure exactly what you mean when you imply that you're being served by wind energy, but that energy basically just goes into the grid and is mixed with other energy (coal, nuke, etc.), so unless you are hooked up directly to a windmill, you would never know whether you are getting wind energy.
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Old 10-11-2008, 07:14 AM
 
1,151 posts, read 2,668,547 times
Reputation: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by verybadgnome View Post
Well the "problem" as I see it is that in Texas you have cities that can enforce zoning restrictions and then you have unincorporated parts of counties in which the jurisdictions have almost no say as far as what individuals can do with their land. The reason the windies are winning their fights for these farms is the opposition doesn't have much of a leg to stand on. The anti-wind people say the turbines are unsightly and noisy and that may be so but there aren't and ordinances that can be enforced against them. Having almost unlimited property rights is something Texans take a great deal of pride in but then they shouldn't complain when their neighbors do something they don't particularly care for and doesn't cause them any real harm as that would be very hypocritical........I think a lot of this is jealousy that rancher A got a sweetheart deal of $3k/turbine/year times 200 and rancher B didn't get in on the action.
Interesting argument considering that it's coming from someone who started this discussion by criticizing someone for living on 20 acres because it isn't fair to the rest of society. I guess when the argument supports your pet project, you're all for it.
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Old 02-15-2009, 08:43 AM
 
Location: dripping springs,tx
40 posts, read 113,865 times
Reputation: 17
my wife and i just bought a house in highpointe. i guess the commute may be sort of long, but i live near baltimore and it takes an hour and a half to get to work.
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