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Old 07-27-2008, 12:22 PM
 
6,384 posts, read 11,540,902 times
Reputation: 3040

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Quote:
Originally Posted by austin-steve View Post
I'm sorry you feel that way. You are limiting your possibilities in life with your limiting beliefs.
Thanks for posting that steve, that echoes my thoughts exactly. This is by far the #1 obstacle for most people - their own limiting beliefs.

If he really wanted to live in travis heights he could. He just isnt willing to actually try, he just complains about life not being fair. There is one property forsale in travis heights that is 300K and 1600 sq ft. All he has to do is find one other person to purchase the house with him and voila, he is living in travis heights for 150K. If he cant afford a 150K house then he has other issues.

Now Im sure he can come up with all the reason why he couldnt do this rather than trying to overcome the obstacles.
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Old 07-27-2008, 03:06 PM
 
187 posts, read 776,730 times
Reputation: 98
I'm not going to drag this out any longer, other than to say that I truly love my home and the town in which I live, Taylor, and I also love what I do for a living, and so I'm not going to compromise. I'm not going to find a more lucrative job, because I'm not in it for the money. I'm not going to live in a piece-of-junk new home in a development (like KB, for example, or that new townhome junkpile that's billing itself as "East Travis Heights" in 78741, my old zipcode.) This, as you have pointed out several times, is my problem.

I'm going to get on with my day. I gotta get back to work.

But I do believe strongly in the following sentiments. I am not happy with capitalism. I don't have to like it, and yet I can still live here and be a productive American citizen, and not move to Cuba, as another poster joked. (Oddly, Cuba has a much lower infant mortality rate than the USA; so if I popped out a kid, it'd have a better chance of survival and better health care if I did move to Cuba. But Cuba has lots of other problems, to say the very least.)

I do believe in the following. That's all I'll say. I won't post any more on this thread...especially since it's moved very far from its original intent.

Right To The City Alliance

Anti-gentrification movement growing in the United States

Over the last twenty years, the federal government is cutting programs and services, placing a greater burden on state and city governments. Unable to handle the pressure, cities are using neo-liberal policies and privatization to sell land, programs, and resources to make ends meet. As a result, instead of working with community, labor, cultural, academic, and faith-based communities, mayors are cutting deals with luxury developers and multi-national corporations.

Affordable housing, public space, transportation, schools, are all being sold to the highest bidder, costing us our services, programs, access, resources and, in general, our right to the city.

Increasing gentrification in America's midsized cities has spurred collective actions and gained victories among local communities fighting for their right to stay, says Wiretap Magazine, a national news and culture magazine by and for socially conscious youth.

Author Roopa Singh reports that the U.S. anti-gentrification movement has gained inspiration from a banner-worthy ideology called "Right to the City." French philosopher Henri Lefebvre believed in returning decision-making power in cities back to all urban dwellers.

Singh says we should be studying the Right to the City concept “because gentrification causes urban citizens to feel the glistening, hungry fangs of globalization at home, literally, and Lefebvre's theory helps us understand our rights, especially in an era of worldwide war.”

“The Right to the City ideology is spreading through the national activist ranks, lately through the work of the Right To The City Alliance (a national advocacy group representing community organizations in nine cities) and the United Nations, sending smoke signals from coast to embattled coast,” adds Singh.

Right to the City (RTTC) is a newly formed alliance of base building organizations from cities across the United States as well as researchers, academics, lawyers, and other allies that came together in January 2007 to build a united response to gentrification and the drastic changes imposed on our cities

“All across the U.S., working class neighborhoods and Black, Latino, and Asian people are being displaced from our cities at a scale not seen since the abuses of urban renewal in the 1960s,” says the RTTC. “Sky-rocketing rents, mass evictions, low-wage jobs have eroded vibrant historic communities that are being replaced with luxury condominiums, shopping centers, and tourist attractions.

“At the same time, from Oakland to Miami to Boston there are hundreds of tenants, families, and workers who are forming organizations and waging campaigns to defend our neighborhoods and our livelihood.”

RTTC national organizer Valerie Taing says an ideal city is one “where everything is controlled by, developed by, and meets the needs of the people that live there, and I get to sit on a porch and build with elders.”

Last edited by schoenfraun; 07-27-2008 at 03:08 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 07-28-2008, 09:33 AM
 
2,955 posts, read 6,746,725 times
Reputation: 1928
Quote:
Originally Posted by coleslaw View Post
If I wanted to buy a house in the say, low 100s, and put some $$ into fixing it up, in what part of town would I look?
East side.
I have a friend who has recently looked into investment properties in east Austin. He thinks it is feasible to buy a run down duplex in an area where there are some of those in the 100s (not sure how low) next to renovated homes that are listed at 500-600K. One of his investor ideas is to buy a crappy duplex, move into it, and start fixing it up - as soon as one side is livable, rent it out and continue to fix up the rented side until it is nice. Then move into the nice side and start over the process.
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Old 07-28-2008, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Central North Carolina
148 posts, read 486,828 times
Reputation: 69
I would say try east riverside and north of it...youre going to have to live in gangsterville if you want under 100k...and when you do fix it up, are you going to change the neighborhood. i lived on east riverside in student housing for a year and heard 1 person get murdered and apparently another did 4 buildings from me, not to mention car alarms and everything else. I would probably stick with Hays/Georgetown or even San Marcos...
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Old 07-29-2008, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Up in a cedar tree.
1,618 posts, read 5,966,164 times
Reputation: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by schoenfraun View Post
I am mad that the folks that work in Central Austin and make it go--the busboys, the short-order cooks, the bellhops, the bartenders, the landscape crews, the pool cleaners, the bus drivers, the janitors, the day care center employees, to say nothing of the petit-bourgeois folks like me (a state employee) who work at desks all day--can't afford properties in central Austin.

It's absurd. I mean, 200k for a falling down-piece of junk on the east side, as a tear-down, is offensive to me.

It's not the home, it's the land. More then likely the person(s) who purchase this will either someone that will tear down that little home on that small lot and build a McMansion; just like they are doing the pretty Terrytown area. Yea is stinks to see that happen...
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Old 07-29-2008, 10:44 AM
 
2,955 posts, read 6,746,725 times
Reputation: 1928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike78613 View Post
It's not the home, it's the land. More then likely the person(s) who purchase this will either someone that will tear down that little home on that small lot and build a McMansion; just like they are doing the pretty Terrytown area. Yea is stinks to see that happen...
Or...they will fix up that rundown, useless little home and return it to its state of viable living space. What's wrong with that? Even if they do tear it down -- should we instead let every old, rundown house deteriorate forever just out of nostalgia? Why not actually use the residential lots in Austin for residence rather than junkyards?
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Old 07-29-2008, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,423 posts, read 37,832,578 times
Reputation: 22576
Quote:
Originally Posted by b. frank View Post
Or...they will fix up that rundown, useless little home and return it to its state of viable living space. What's wrong with that? Even if they do tear it down -- should we instead let every old, rundown house deteriorate forever just out of nostalgia? Why not actually use the residential lots in Austin for residence rather than junkyards?
Exactly! Why not put something besides McMansions on it?
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Old 07-29-2008, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Up in a cedar tree.
1,618 posts, read 5,966,164 times
Reputation: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by b. frank View Post
Or...they will fix up that rundown, useless little home and return it to its state of viable living space. What's wrong with that? Even if they do tear it down -- should we instead let every old, rundown house deteriorate forever just out of nostalgia? Why not actually use the residential lots in Austin for residence rather than junkyards?

McMansion is not a praticle house to it's neighbors, which makes the neihborhood look like more crap! I say if the new owner that buys it, fixes it up, yes GREAT! McMansion; NO!
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Old 07-29-2008, 11:27 AM
 
2,955 posts, read 6,746,725 times
Reputation: 1928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike78613 View Post
McMansion is not a praticle house to it's neighbors, which makes the neihborhood look like more crap! I say if the new owner that buys it, fixes it up, yes GREAT! McMansion; NO!
I generally agree.
Still, I say a McMansion is better than a useless, wasted, rotting house.
To me, the McMansions of Tarrytown look better than some of the old junkers in Austin that look like they are inhabited by the family in Texas Chainsaw Massacre...or left vacant.
Of course, my personal choice would be to fix up the original spec.
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Old 07-29-2008, 12:12 PM
 
1,316 posts, read 1,736,926 times
Reputation: 1696
I am a person who decided ten years ago that I did not like my commute from Oak Hill so moved into Central Austin when prices were still somewhat affordable. I am a state worker and now live under four miles from my office in an old, but comfortable house. I have had to make concessions to stay in Central Austin; I drive an old car and live very frugally. It is the property taxes that will finally get me. If I had to find a cheaper house right this minute, I would probably look far north central or wherever transit was available to get me downtown to work. On Sunday, we looked at a couple of houses under $200K in Mesa Woods (Arboretum area) that had lots of potential not to mention a great location.
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