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Old 08-06-2008, 06:27 PM
 
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Does it apply only to the footprint of the house or does it limit vertical space?
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Old 08-06-2008, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Rural Central Texas
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I am not sure what the current requlation is. I found a description of the rules at Interim McMansion Regulations (http://www.pembertonheights.org/McMansion/Interim_Guidelines_1st_reading.htm - broken link)

I don't know if this represents the actual current regulation or not. But if it does, or is close, it could provide some insight as to how to interpret the current regulations.

According to what I see here, it would apply to total floor space regardless of what level that floor space exists. I suppose if you wanted to test the rules you could build a multistory building with a small foot print and the maximum gross floor space. That should get you a view!
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Old 08-06-2008, 06:46 PM
 
Location: central Austin
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Hoo-boy this is a tricky one. My understanding is that in addition to limitations on what percentage of the lot can have impervious cover, there is also an "envelope" of vertical space in which the building must fit -- one of the main goals of the ordinance was to protect neighboring houses from new homes that towered over them and blocked the light and were generally out of scale with the neighborhood.

So it is not just a sq footage restriction but also impacts how that sq footage is arranged. I can get you more detail if you want it. It also depends what the original zoning is and what the existing height restrictions are.

Here's the text of the actual ordinance, much of it pertains to duplexes.

http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/zoning/do...tive062808.pdf
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Old 08-06-2008, 06:53 PM
 
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Seems like it would apply to basements and tasteful finished attics.
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Old 08-07-2008, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Southwest Austin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Exiled Texan View Post
Does it apply only to the footprint of the house or does it limit vertical space?
Both. And it's based on lot size, set backs and many complicated factors. There is an effort underway to simplify the calculations.

steve
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Old 10-27-2011, 10:36 AM
 
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Well, in the matter of dealing with this situation, i would say that there are always going to be problems. The issue should be handled with maturity and responsibility, and taken unto an appinted court of law.
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Old 10-27-2011, 02:00 PM
 
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McMansion added FAR or Floor to Area ratio into the mix of calculations for residential - You can look up the ratio based on your zoning. This is in addition to the other pre-existing calculations that are required for permit including building coverage and impervious coverage. McMansion also added the idea of a set back zoning or a zoning tent that the building must fit within; its essential a 45 degree plane that starts from your property line and extends starting at a height of 15' into the lot.
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Old 10-27-2011, 07:25 PM
 
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It sounds more limiting that it really is though (unfortunately if you happen to live next to a monster house). Look at some of the new construction in Rosedale. There is one particular red house that I assume stays within the McMansion law but towers above the two original houses next to it.
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