U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 02-26-2009, 11:54 AM
 
132 posts, read 247,989 times
Reputation: 112
Default FM, CR, RR, RM.... what do these mean?

I've seen a lot of roads with these letters in front and my curiosity is killing me. What do they mean? My best guesses are:

FM: no idea
CR: County Route
RR: Rural Route (or Ranch Road?)
RM: no idea

Please educate me. Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-26-2009, 11:58 AM
 
Location: central Austin
4,596 posts, read 6,658,435 times
Reputation: 1883
FM: Farm to Market
RM: Ranch to Market

RR: Rural Road would be my guess
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2009, 12:00 PM
 
Location: 78747
3,203 posts, read 2,519,761 times
Reputation: 915
CR = county road

Roads east of 35 are FM
Roads west of 35 are RM typically

RR = Ranch Road?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2009, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Milwood
132 posts, read 253,687 times
Reputation: 52
RR = Ranch Road. You'll even see it on the signs.

Here's a wiki reference to FM and RM roads.

Also, here's a snippet from the site:

However, in Texas, the terms "Farm to Market Road" or "Ranch to Market Road" indicate a road that is part of the state's system of secondary and connecting routes, built and maintained by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). This system was established in 1949 as a project to provide access to rural areas. The system consists primarily of paved, two-lane roads. Roads occurring west of U.S. Highway 281 (or Interstate 35 in some locations) are designated ranch-to-market roads, while those occurring east of US 281 are generally designated farm-to-market roads, though there are exceptions to this naming system.
Although these roads are signed "farm road" or "ranch road" (or simply "FM" and "RM" on larger sign assemblies), the proper name is Farm-to-Market and Ranch-to-Market road. The only exception is Ranch Road 1, which runs near the former ranch home of former President Lyndon B. Johnson.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2009, 01:01 PM
 
132 posts, read 247,989 times
Reputation: 112
Thank you! Great explanations!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2009, 02:27 PM
Status: "Back to the grind" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: Jollyville
2,724 posts, read 5,507,293 times
Reputation: 2059
Yes, RR is Ranch Road. 620 is an RR.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2009, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Chicago--Bucktown
425 posts, read 880,757 times
Reputation: 168
From my understanding, the terms were originally intended to describe the type of traffic that you came across on the road. For example, a FM or Farm-to-Market road, you were more likely to encounter slow moving combines and such, where as a ranch-road would have more cattle trailers and the like. Of course, most of this is a non-issue now as more and more roads are being updated to 4 lanes or more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2009, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
544 posts, read 887,709 times
Reputation: 144
you're gonna see more deer on rr's than on fm's -- some folks have been known to shoot deer from cr's and pick up beer cans on rm's
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2009, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Milwood
132 posts, read 253,687 times
Reputation: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by hank0604 View Post
From my understanding, the terms were originally intended to describe the type of traffic that you came across on the road. For example, a FM or Farm-to-Market road, you were more likely to encounter slow moving combines and such, where as a ranch-road would have more cattle trailers and the like. Of course, most of this is a non-issue now as more and more roads are being updated to 4 lanes or more.
The official explanation is posted above by me.

D
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top