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Old 09-25-2009, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Fairfield County, CT
7,221 posts, read 5,120,844 times
Reputation: 3883

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Lived in Austin 17 years. I guess I just don't like gritty. Prefer Art in galleries than in studios. ( I never know what to say when the artist is standing there ).

I don't know what the most 'Austinish' coffee shop means. Last time I was in Cafe Mundi the word that came to mind was dirty.

I don't drink or go to bars. I guess the East Side just holds no appeal from me, and like I said, I'm anti-dirt.

Guess I'm not cool enough...
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Old 09-25-2009, 11:25 AM
 
2,060 posts, read 3,541,530 times
Reputation: 1378
"trashy" areas don't bother me. In fact I feel a tad more at home. I grew up in a rural area where people stereotypically had beat up cars on blocks, firewood piled on the porch, and a trash barrel out back. I also think that areas that aren't as perfect and squeaky-clean are more interesting and have more interesting people who live there. These new gentrified areas feel fake to me and everyone is competing with one another for houses, who has the coolest car, the hippest fashions and outfits, and the whole nine yards. Sure- I appreciate coffee shops, brew pubs, and the like. But my roots has me prefer the less than perfect.

That and when areas look less than perfect, it tends to scare away yuppies whom drive up the prices.
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Old 09-25-2009, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Fairfield County, CT
7,221 posts, read 5,120,844 times
Reputation: 3883
Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
"trashy" areas don't bother me. In fact I feel a tad more at home. I grew up in a rural area where people stereotypically had beat up cars on blocks, firewood piled on the porch, and a trash barrel out back. I also think that areas that aren't as perfect and squeaky-clean are more interesting and have more interesting people who live there. These new gentrified areas feel fake to me and everyone is competing with one another for houses, who has the coolest car, the hippest fashions and outfits, and the whole nine yards. Sure- I appreciate coffee shops, brew pubs, and the like. But my roots has me prefer the less than perfect.

That and when areas look less than perfect, it tends to scare away yuppies whom drive up the prices.
I guess you "are" cool enough.

Interesting people are found everywhere. I meet interesting people when I fly first class. I meet interesting people in the supermarket. I try not to prejudge people by social class, nor do I pretend that poverty is somehow virtuous and that success is evil.

I work very hard to attain my version of success... I hope that doesn't make me less interesting because I live in a neighborhood that doesn't have trash on the sidewalks or cars on cement blocks
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Old 09-25-2009, 11:46 AM
 
2,060 posts, read 3,541,530 times
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No, don't get me wrong. I appreciate success as well. I used to cut glass and mix paint for a living. Then I worked my way up. I've lived in huge major metros after coming from a town of around 500. But the older I get, the more that I find that I for some reason just get along with people that are like those I grew up with. I'm sort of laid back. People in Silicon Valley are like rats, running all the time.

That and I have to admit that when yuppies move in, they tend to make areas that used to be sort of non-descript more interesting. I also find myself liking the neighborhoods they live in but the prices generally immediately turn me off. I guess you could say that after dealing with the non-stop high cost of living, the gentrification, the yuppies, and so on who I've been surrounded by in the Bay Area that I'm really sick of it and almost want to get as far from that as possible.
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Old 09-25-2009, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Austin
1,633 posts, read 1,958,606 times
Reputation: 625
Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
"trashy" areas don't bother me. In fact I feel a tad more at home. I grew up in a rural area where people stereotypically had beat up cars on blocks, firewood piled on the porch, and a trash barrel out back. I also think that areas that aren't as perfect and squeaky-clean are more interesting and have more interesting people who live there. These new gentrified areas feel fake to me and everyone is competing with one another for houses, who has the coolest car, the hippest fashions and outfits, and the whole nine yards. Sure- I appreciate coffee shops, brew pubs, and the like. But my roots has me prefer the less than perfect.

That and when areas look less than perfect, it tends to scare away yuppies whom drive up the prices.
I think I know what you mean. I didn't grow up with the cars on blocks, etc, but I started out in a small town. When I was a kid, we crossed the street to get past the pool hall on our way to the corner store. Or, we stayed the course and suppressed laughter/fear as we walked by the town "crazy".

I don't like filth, but I'm comfortable with a mix of things in close proximity. I think some of the gentrified homes are nice, but I know what you mean with regard to seeming fake. Sometimes, they're so pretentious that it's comical.

Last edited by capcat; 09-25-2009 at 12:37 PM..
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Old 09-25-2009, 12:31 PM
 
2,060 posts, read 3,541,530 times
Reputation: 1378
Exactly. The fakeness you mention is what I was alluding to. It seems that just about everyone inquiring wants to know where the safest, cleanest, most perfect neighborhoods with the best schools, and so on are. If enough people live just like that, then what you get is sterility. Give me imperfection over perfection anyday. Where I live now used to be a navy town. It was sort of like that when I moved here 7 years ago. But slowly the old people have sold out and their sort of weathered houses have been bought by 20-30somethings who immediately spend tons of money fixing them up. They tend to also own cute cars: Minis, VW's, and the like. Then they immediately start playing Mom and Dad, have a couple of kids, and wallah- in their large numbers have turned what was once a semi-working class town into a town of yuppies who moved here because they liked the original charm but in the process wound up turning it into a sterile, pretentious environment.

I really can't put my finger on it. I guess to be brutally honest it bothers me because as soon as these kind of people start showing up, its not going to be too long before the area becomes overpriced and expensive and thus not really all that fun of a place because you then have to compete with them and often times they have more money to get what they want. It just sort of bothers me because they (not that I blame them) seem to always pick the neatest spots of any given city and then suddenly if you want to live in that city you will effectively be priced out of a lot of the areas that are neat. I suppose that sounds stupid, but its the truth in my opinion.
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Old 09-25-2009, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
16,517 posts, read 23,015,072 times
Reputation: 12821
And then, of course, the "neatest spot" is, over time, stripped of the things that make it neat. I get where you're coming from, watched it happen often.
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Old 09-25-2009, 01:00 PM
 
2,060 posts, read 3,541,530 times
Reputation: 1378
Exactly. All that's left is the fact that there's now a lot of nice looking houses. Its like this where I live now. You walk around and there's all these really nice, fixed up houses. But its strange because these were the houses that people who worked on ships, or in town used to own. They were ordinary, practical people that didn't make the big bucks. There's a local Moose Lodge and an Eagles Lodge. Almost all of the men that go there are getting really old. None of the newcomers participate. There used to be an old pharmacy. It had linoleum floors and a 60's interior. It got bought and turned into another pharmacy and now its all fancy and chic inside. Something was lost.

So when I walk around these types of neighborhoods- the places that what used to be the homes or regular working Joes- and now its full of upper management executives who've spent lots of money to make their homes look like somethin they're not, it bothers me.

But I think in some ways we've done this to ourselves. I visit my parents back in TN once a year. They're building the hell out of their area too. Lots of people coming down buying these enormous houses in tract developments. Its the same story: an old farmer who wanted to leave the farm to his kids sells out after given enough money and a developer bulldozes the whole area- trees and all- and builds 30-50 houses that all look the same and people -usually from elsewhere- move in thinking how cheap it is for the physical amount of house they get. As a result the area is turning generic. It could be anywhere. It could be in Texas, California, North Carolina. You can't tell the difference because you'll find the same big box stores, the same places to eat, and so on.

So that means that for those who don't like that, there's not a lot of alternatives, and since people with money typically don't like to be associated with "those other people", they by default choose these older, more unique areas and in turn build their little fortress areas to keep out the riff-raff.
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Old 09-25-2009, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX!!!!
3,742 posts, read 5,450,231 times
Reputation: 1669
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlassoff View Post
How do the people of Seattle know who to sneer at? Do the Christians there carry giant crucifixes? Do they walk around with big arrows pointing at them? How do you pick them out of the crowd?

Or is it Christians on the street shoving the bible in your face who are sneered at? Otherwise, how would you know?
God and Country in Seattle
Here's a wonderful example of a few people doing just that. And what THL said. I earned my JD at the UW law school and the kind of sneering I heard from my classmates during discussions just left me feeling ill. If people attended church, they were unenlightened and backwards.
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Old 09-27-2009, 07:45 PM
 
Location: New England
790 posts, read 820,109 times
Reputation: 506
Funny, how if you bring up that Obama attends Church, those same sneerers look confused and unhappy!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennibc View Post
God and Country in Seattle
Here's a wonderful example of a few people doing just that. And what THL said. I earned my JD at the UW law school and the kind of sneering I heard from my classmates during discussions just left me feeling ill. If people attended church, they were unenlightened and backwards.
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