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Old 11-17-2009, 10:10 AM
 
18 posts, read 49,979 times
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The scenario the original poster describes is common in most of Central Texas/Austin schools in neighborhoods where the cost of housing is not affordable for most minority groups -- a harsh reality of economics. In addition, Austin does not have as large a vibrant and financially successful pool of minority professionals and business people as you would find in cities such as Baltimore, Atlanta, Houston or Chicago. Therefore, chances of seeing many black/minority groups in the exclusive suburbs are indeed very slim. Most newcomers to Austin quickly see this lack of diversity and while it is not Austin's fault that things are as they are, it does show the city has a long way to go in terms of being as diverse as some of the places you may have lived or visisted. Before someone says the poster can move to another place, just keep in mind that the parent may be comfortable with living in Austin but feels bad for the kid who will not enjoy the diverse experience the parent had elsewhere. Also, you cannot just leave a place you have a job and a career just because it lacks diversity.
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Old 11-18-2009, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
2,102 posts, read 3,917,623 times
Reputation: 2713
Quote:
Originally Posted by atxcio View Post
Let's be honest though. That's not the diversity anyone here is really talking about. When white people say diversity, they mean this:

#14 Having Black Friends Stuff White People Like
So true. Also, don't forget this:

#7 Diversity Stuff White People Like

Just goes to show you that the word "diversity" is a loaded term.

But back to the original topic: When I hear most people talk about diversity, race is always the thing that comes up, but I rarely hear people discussing economic diversity. Objectivity said it best:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Objectivity View Post
The scenario the original poster describes is common in most of Central Texas/Austin schools in neighborhoods where the cost of housing is not affordable for most minority groups -- a harsh reality of economics.
My family is well-off, but when I was growing up in northwest Austin, I was friends with people from all different economic backgrounds. I'm thankful that my parents raised me to associate with all kinds of people, not just rich folk.

Original poster - if you want your kids to meet more kids outside their normal environment, maybe you could enroll them in some sort of after-school program somewhere outside of Tarrytown? I don't really know how to solve your dilemma, but this is just a thought I had.
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Old 11-18-2009, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Warrior Country
4,577 posts, read 5,413,733 times
Reputation: 3953
Quote:
Originally Posted by Objectivity View Post
The scenario the original poster describes is common in most of Central Texas/Austin schools in neighborhoods where the cost of housing is not affordable for most minority groups -- a harsh reality of economics. In addition, Austin does not have as large a vibrant and financially successful pool of minority professionals and business people as you would find in cities such as Baltimore, Atlanta, Houston or Chicago. Therefore, chances of seeing many black/minority groups in the exclusive suburbs are indeed very slim. Most newcomers to Austin quickly see this lack of diversity and while it is not Austin's fault that things are as they are, it does show the city has a long way to go in terms of being as diverse as some of the places you may have lived or visisted. Before someone says the poster can move to another place, just keep in mind that the parent may be comfortable with living in Austin but feels bad for the kid who will not enjoy the diverse experience the parent had elsewhere. Also, you cannot just leave a place you have a job and a career just because it lacks diversity.
Are you saying minority or blacks? (If you insert "black" or "blacks" every time you wrote "minority", then i would agree with the post above). But if as far as Austin & minorities are concerned:

- Many minorities are located in higher end NW & SW suburbs of Austin...look at the greatschools demographics.

- These minorities are "vibrant" & "financially successful". Much more so than Houston....don't know about Bmore & hotlanta.

- Austin does NOT have a long way to go....it's crazy diverse. Sure there are pockets of white bread....but also lots of diversity.


Last edited by hound 109; 11-18-2009 at 12:42 PM..
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