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Old 09-13-2010, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,687 posts, read 34,675,136 times
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First off, I am a yank and a yankee as well. Northerner from about 'the North' within the U.S.

Always found it funny that within the U.S., 'yankee' is very specific to people who are NOT of the South, and most specifically the people north of the southern states - basically the people who fought against 'the Confederacy).

You guys have no idea how much you rile up southerners who have always made strong distinctions between yankees and non-yankees

(Sorry Southerners, who read this!)

Anyways, how did the term gain so much popularity?
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Old 09-13-2010, 12:46 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,116,816 times
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Because we're constantly bombarded with American culture, we tend to disparage this by saying things like 'those damn yanks', 'all these yank shows on tv', but secretly we love you guys.
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Old 09-13-2010, 01:16 AM
 
656 posts, read 2,371,542 times
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This is from Wikipedia, so it may not be accurate

The term Yankee (sometimes shortened to "Yank"), has a few related meanings, usually referring to someone either of general United States origin or, more specifically within the U.S., to people originating in New England, where application of the term is largely restricted to descendants of the English settlers of the region.

The meaning of "Yankee" has varied over time. Originally in the 18th century it referred to residents of New England of colonial English descent, which was later used by Mark Twain in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889). As early as the 1770s, the British used the term for any person from the U.S. In the 19th century, southern U.S. people used the term to refer to those from the northern U.S. who were not recent immigrants from Europe; thus a visitor to Richmond, Virginia, in 1818 commented, "The enterprising people are mostly strangers; Scotch, Irish, and especially New England men, or Yankees, as they are called."


Outside the country, "Yankee" or "Yank" is a slang term for anyone from the United States. It is especially popular with the British.


In other English-speaking countries

In English-speaking countries outside the United States, especially in Britain, Australia, Canada, Ireland, and New Zealand, Yankee, almost universally shortened to Yank, is used as a derogatory, playful or colloquial term for Americans.

In certain Commonwealth countries, especially Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, "Yank" has been in common use since at least World War II, when hundreds of thousands of Americans were stationed in Britain, Australia and New Zealand. Depending on the country, "Yankee" may be considered mildly derogatory.

So we only really use it to describe all Americans, no reference to the North and South
For me personally I only saw it as playful term to describe Americans
But as with the term 'Pom' for the British, I do not use 'Yank' any more in my vocabulary to describe Americans

You have to be very PC in this day and age, so there is always a chance now of upsetting someone. So Now I definitely do not use it


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Old 09-13-2010, 01:30 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,687 posts, read 34,675,136 times
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I've been referred to as a Yank by many Aussies and Brits. But being I am a yankee by u.s. standards, it has never bothered me.

But I know TONS of Americans who are from Texas, Georgia, you name it...haha, quickly offended by the term.

Interesting the link that referred several times as being derogatory. Yeah, I have heard it used in such ways as well.

On to other things...POMMIES (for Brits)...what exactly is that short for?

------

Another note..when I first got around many Brits/Aussies/etc., it did seem like they might have had strong dislike for Americans. But than I realized, Brits specifically, they have similar names/feelings about pretty much ALL nationalities that aren't Brits. I also quickly realized that among Brits/Aussies, that beyond their usage of terms, they don't really have any problems with Americans at all, even if they use the terms in ways that sound like they do. It seems to be just part of the way they talk, use words, etc. Just pops out of their mouth without any negative meaning behind it.

By the way, what is the term for Canadians that is a bit derogatory (or not) within Australia? Is there one?
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Old 09-13-2010, 01:34 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,360 posts, read 5,178,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
First off, I am a yank and a yankee as well. Northerner from about 'the North' within the U.S.

Always found it funny that within the U.S., 'yankee' is very specific to people who are NOT of the South, and most specifically the people north of the southern states - basically the people who fought against 'the Confederacy).

You guys have no idea how much you rile up southerners who have always made strong distinctions between yankees and non-yankees

(Sorry Southerners, who read this!)

Anyways, how did the term gain so much popularity?
I found this out the hard way, thanks to some loud mouthed Texan i met in Croatia.
Dont know how it came so popular? Aussies love shortening words and using coloqualisms, and most would know nothing about the history of the term. Yank just seems cool and easy to say.
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Old 09-13-2010, 01:36 AM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,791 posts, read 7,494,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
You guys have no idea how much you rile up southerners who have always made strong distinctions between yankees and non-yankees
Well, all the more reason to use the term then eh?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Anyways, how did the term gain so much popularity?
It's just part of the culture to give someone a nickname wherever possible. It's an indication of the general informality we prefer.

Even individuals - Barry = Bazza, Sharon = Shazza, a red-head is Blue or Bluey, a bald-headed bloke is Curly, Jason Akermanis = Aker, Ben Cousins = Cuz, John Worsfold = Woosha.

The nickname doesn't have to make sense but if you're given one, it's considered a good thing, that you're accepted. If you get all offended about the nickname, it's not considered good form. Some nicknames can seem rude, but that means we really like you. Make sense?

There's all sorts of theories what POM stands for but most of us don't care. Just like we don't care if Yank is technically wrong for some Americans. It's just a nickname. It's informality. No point in getting your knickers in a twist over something so trivial.

Unfortunately in these days of increasing PC, more and more offense is perceived, with some miserable people looking for it where it doesn't exist.
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Old 09-13-2010, 02:18 AM
 
656 posts, read 2,371,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I've been referred to as a Yank by many Aussies and Brits. But being I am a yankee by u.s. standards, it has never bothered me.

But I know TONS of Americans who are from Texas, Georgia, you name it...haha, quickly offended by the term.

Interesting the link that referred several times as being derogatory. Yeah, I have heard it used in such ways as well.

On to other things...POMMIES (for Brits)...what exactly is that short for?

------

Another note..when I first got around many Brits/Aussies/etc., it did seem like they might have had strong dislike for Americans. But than I realized, Brits specifically, they have similar names/feelings about pretty much ALL nationalities that aren't Brits. I also quickly realized that among Brits/Aussies, that beyond their usage of terms, they don't really have any problems with Americans at all, even if they use the terms in ways that sound like they do. It seems to be just part of the way they talk, use words, etc. Just pops out of their mouth without any negative meaning behind it.

By the way, what is the term for Canadians that is a bit derogatory (or not) within Australia? Is there one?

I posted this not long ago on another thread

'POM is all the more confusing because historians still argue today what the word POM actually means
Popular belief is it comes from the word 'pomegranate'. From newly arrived British migrants arriving by boat with fair skin and red cheeks
Others say its stands for POHM, which was printed on the back of newly arrived Convicts from the motherland. Being short for 'Prisoner Of His Majesty'

For Canadians there is not really a nick name for them here
I have called them Eskimos but they don't really seem to bite
They just return it with Convicts in describing Aussies so its all good
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Old 09-13-2010, 03:01 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,116,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
Well, all the more reason to use the term then eh?




It's just part of the culture to give someone a nickname wherever possible. It's an indication of the general informality we prefer.

Even individuals - Barry = Bazza, Sharon = Shazza, a red-head is Blue or Bluey, a bald-headed bloke is Curly, Jason Akermanis = Aker, Ben Cousins = Cuz, John Worsfold = Woosha.

The nickname doesn't have to make sense but if you're given one, it's considered a good thing, that you're accepted. If you get all offended about the nickname, it's not considered good form. Some nicknames can seem rude, but that means we really like you. Make sense?

There's all sorts of theories what POM stands for but most of us don't care. Just like we don't care if Yank is technically wrong for some Americans. It's just a nickname. It's informality. No point in getting your knickers in a twist over something so trivial.

Unfortunately in these days of increasing PC, more and more offense is perceived, with some miserable people looking for it where it doesn't exist.
Some Americans seem to get offended if they're called a nickname, it seems to be some sort of cultural difference. They get all preachy about their 'rights' and all that self-important spoutin'. Not all, but some.
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Old 09-13-2010, 03:14 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,687 posts, read 34,675,136 times
Reputation: 9219
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Some Americans seem to get offended if they're called a nickname, it seems to be some sort of cultural difference. They get all preachy about their 'rights' and all that self-important spoutin'. Not all, but some.
There has been a massive public effort to eradicate almost all 'nicknames' that might have existed. It's to the point that if you have describe your black friend who is waiting at the station for your friend who has to pick him up, but wondering who to look for - it is a struggle trying to think of the right word to say...'African-American' seems to be the current acceptable one. But with so many African-Africans and black Carribean-Africans and everything else, we don't even know how to say that one anymore - as these days, those guys will make an issue of even that!

I think also, the US being so big, that almost all foreigners from most of the world seem exotic and interesting...and only a very few would have derogatory names - towel####s (that got beeped out just typing it!), or frenchies...might be the only two I can think of, and if you even use those, you would quickly offend all kinds of other Americans.

So, when I have encountered Aussies/Brits, and realize they have all kinds of numerous derogatory-sounding nicknames for everyone you can imagine...it's hard to decipher if it is racist-based or not. But being exposed to quite a few, I've realized it is just a strong part of the vocabulary, etc.

Personally, I'm white American, and even the derogatory words for that sound ridiculously funny to me...******, whitey, etc. (Oops that got beeped out as well)...lol
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Old 09-13-2010, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,595 posts, read 22,894,251 times
Reputation: 3478
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Because we're constantly bombarded with American culture, we tend to disparage this by saying things like 'those damn yanks', 'all these yank shows on tv', but secretly we love you guys.
Reminds me of a post on the Alabama forum "damnyankee" is meant to be one word, not two.
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