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Old 02-07-2011, 05:50 PM
 
105 posts, read 253,398 times
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What are the differences and similarities between rural Australia and rural America?

In terms of:
-Guns
-Religion
-Hospitality
-Small towns
-Is it uncommon for someone to live in rural Australia?
-Farming
-Isolation
-There's a huge difference in rural americans and urban americans, does that exist in Australia?
-rural America is overwhelmingly conservative where urban is more liberal, same with Australia?

If you can answer any of these questions or have anything else to add that would be great, thank you!
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Old 02-07-2011, 06:37 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 46,698,836 times
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Any reason you're asking?

I haven't been to America yet so I don't know what rural folk are really like over there. Having lived in the city and the country here, though, I have a bit of an idea.

In my experience, rural Australians aren't any more religious than city-dwellers. They may be a bit more traditional in other ways though.

Gun laws are more relaxed for farmers, but it's not like you see every farmer toting a shotgun either.

From what I've found country folk are a bit more open and up for a yarn than city folk, although in the end they're still just people like city folk. Some rural areas strike me as being more hospitable than other areas.

Well over 80% of Aussies live in cities, but I don't think 'uncommon' is the right word. Certainly we don't have the rural densities that America does outside certain areas.

Rural dwellers might be a bit more conservative with regards with social and economic issues, and tend to vote the Coalition, Nationals or Independents. Labor has always represented the urban 'working class' although it kind of shed that union-image awhile ago.

I'd say in some respects urbanites and ruralites seem different here, but in other ways not that much. You can sometimes tell if you someone is from the country by the way they speak (in America rural dwellers seem to speak similar to city-dwellers except in the south and maybe New England).
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Old 02-11-2011, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Denver via Austin
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Is there really that much of an urban/rural divide in America? Perhaps it's becuase of where I was raised, but I've never noticed much of a difference in culture (politics, though, is another matter).
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Old 02-23-2011, 03:35 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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I live in rural America and have a good friend who lives in Aukland. Other than linguistics I see little difference between Chicago and my friend's city. Of course a big difference is size. America is 3,000 miles from west coast to eact coast.

I saw the two Crocodile Dundee movies that were allegedly set in the outback. The trees are different, the bats are a little larger, but we don't have 'roos or the same types of native tribes. Ws do have mountains, streams, alligators and crocs, bayou, Native American Indians, large rivers and massive lakes inland, vast sandy, dusty and windy areas.

Our rual areas are primarily in Agriculture states or states where there are large livestock operations, or in areas that are not practical to inhabit. Illinois and Iowa are the largest corn and soybean producers in America. Our other major exports are beef and pork. Florida, CAlifornia and Wastington state export exotic veggies, fruits, flowers and wines. Middle America produces the seasonal fruits and veggies like pumpkin, tomatoes, beans and table corn as well as grains.

How rural America views any urban areas depends a great deal on age, location, employment and the level of boredom. When you are 200 miles from a major city like Chicago you rarely think about it unless you are young and want to seek your fortune. Older folks are glad to have a home, not too much illness, food on the table, and enough money to pay the bills every month. Most people who live in Rural America make their own entertainment. There is always something going on in a nearby town if we want to participate. And there is a lot of outdoor sports such as fishing, hunting, power boating, golf, swimming, camping, hiking, biking, running, baseball, football, soccer, hockey, tennis, volley ball, ice skating, skeet to name a few. There is always indoor sports like bowling, baskeball, table tennis, swimming, skating, , .

Americans are not nearly as broad-minded as Europeans in most matters, so when the PM has a mistress it is not nearly as catastrophic as when the President does. Remember Bill? I mean we just hitch up our Victorian outrage a notch and make a big deal out of a wandering spouse - like it is the first husband that has ever strayed since god created man. The biggst difference in rural America is not between rural and metropolitan as much as it is the difference between services offered in the county seat - where the county courthouse is located - and the rest of the county. If you live in rural America you most often shop in the county seat because that is where you are most likely to find the grocery store and county library, and activities.

I live in a county seat of about 3.000. We have a jeweler, electrician, plumber, hardware stores, lumber store, tractor and auto sales and repair, druggists, barber, florist, clothing stores, grocer, fast food and restaurants, gasoline stations, snack stores, movie rental, bowling, swimmimg, golf, camping, fishing, hunting, marina, library, lawyers, doctors and hospital with lifeflight to major hospitals, ambulance EMT, fire and police protection, state road crews, library, furniture stores, insurance agents, cell phone retailers, liquor stores, parks, broadband fiber, schools, post office, and a movie theater. Other towns in the county have some of these things, but none have all.

Some of it would be hard to duplicate simply beause our farms average 1200 acres. On the other hand there are communities in our state as small as 20 homes. Not all towns the size of mine, nor county seats, offer as much as my community does. I've lived in towns five times larger that did not offer as much - even with a $20M budget!

Rural America tends to be more conservative in business and politics and not terribly diverse when it comes to religion. If you are not christian you tend to be forced to go to a much larger town to meet your religious needs. Rural towns are not terribly friendly until they get to know you and your family. It has always been that way especially so in isolated areas. I do live 50 miles from the nearest large city.

Additionally there is no particular connect between counties or cities or regions of the US. The north is as different from the south as the West coast is from the East coast. It is not minor differences. It is the land, the restaurants, the local customs, the stores, the weather, the clothes, the linguistics, the medical care, and even the religious dogma. The culture shock is more than just moving a few hundred miles to a new location. It is also politics - which is a big part of the American fabric.

.

Last edited by linicx; 03-16-2011 at 02:47 AM..
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Old 02-23-2011, 06:04 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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America has many more major cities than Australia, so I imagine the urban influence is more pervasive in rural areas than here. There are few places more than about 200 miles from a major city, while here there are towns 2,000 miles from a major city.
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Old 02-24-2011, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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America has 3 very large Cities: NY, LA, and Chicago and each has suburb cities such as Brooklyn or Beverly Hills. The urban influence stays near its own epicenter. Very few people who live 200 miles from Chicago obsess over what Chicogans wear, think or do.

Driving 50-100 miles outside any "rural mid American Market" such as Indianapolis or Tulsa, one finds pockets of smaller communities where the neighbor-towns can be seperated by as much as 30 milies. Of these communities, many of which are demographically challenged, only a handful have the funding, the land, or the committment to actually achieve a planned urbanization and the corresponding build-out it brings.
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Old 03-10-2011, 02:43 PM
 
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Most rural communities in America have no desire to become urbanized. The way of life in the US for rural communities is slower, whereas most metropolitan areas has a faster way of life.
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Old 03-10-2011, 04:22 PM
 
Location: US
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marleymaple View Post
What are the differences and similarities between rural Australia and rural America?

In terms of:
-Guns
-Religion
-Hospitality
-Small towns
-Is it uncommon for someone to live in rural Australia?
-Farming
-Isolation
-There's a huge difference in rural americans and urban americans, does that exist in Australia?
-rural America is overwhelmingly conservative where urban is more liberal, same with Australia?

If you can answer any of these questions or have anything else to add that would be great, thank you!
I've lived in both countries and the short answer is yes...there is a big difference between the people who live in rural Australia and urban Australia...most differences are the same as in America.
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Old 03-16-2011, 02:30 AM
 
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YES, there is a HUUUUGE difference. I spent 20 years living in rural Mississippi Tennessee, South Carolina, Nebraska and Louisiana in the States and now I live in a tiny town, population 25, in central Victoria, Australia.
Australia wins hands down for quality of life in the country. The people are wonderful in the American southeast, BUT boy are they judgemental of different races, religions ( other than baptist) and lord help you if you are gay!
I was shocked to find out recently that we have 3 lesbians and 2 gay guys in my little Aussie town, who are loved just as much as all the other 20 residents! Infact nobody gives a darn. In a town I lived in in South Carolina the open gays where literally ran out of town!
I am in a marriage with someone who is not white like myself and we were sneered at in little country towns in America, here downunder, amongst the sheep farmers and vege growers nobody even gives a hoot.
I find that wages out in country Australia are as good as in the big cities, but in America forget about it, expect to take a HUGE paycut.
The countryside is gorgeous in America, but it is often ruined by ugly fast food joints and Walmarts, where as in Australia in my area no chains blight the lovely little historic country towns.
Also most country towns are deserted in the original downtowns in America, as the residents favor strip mall type shopping. Here in Central Victoria the 150 year old downtowns are booming, busy little hubs with all the original mum and pop businesses still flourishing!
I do adore the scenery of the American country towns, but that is it. I did not feel accepted living there as I do here. Making a living was so hard in those towns and I detested the close minded people.
Here amongst the gums with the Roo's, Wombats and Wallabies I feel at home. Once you inhale the sweet smalls of the bush after a rain you will fall in love!
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Old 03-16-2011, 03:48 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 46,698,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmw335xi View Post
I've lived in both countries and the short answer is yes...there is a big difference between the people who live in rural Australia and urban Australia...most differences are the same as in America.
The question was rural Australia vs rural America, not rural vs urban.
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