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Old 04-18-2011, 04:55 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Is it me, or are Australians less friendly now than 20 years ago? This applies mainly to big cities but also smaller towns. If I go for a walk in the suburbs perhaps 1 in 10 people will say 'g'day' (mostly older folk, no surprise) for example. Also, people in the past seemed to take out more time to help you out, and didn't seem as rushed. Maybe it's the rose-tinted glasses, but Aussies aren't really any different to people in more populous, busy nations these days. People don't see to smile that much anymore, and standing in a checkout or something it seems everyone is just glaring at me (although that's probably my insecurity).
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Old 04-18-2011, 05:13 AM
 
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Hard to say. I got sucker punched off of a bar stool in Sydney 35 years ago...
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Old 04-18-2011, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Newcastle NSW Australia
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I would say there is little difference to 20 years ago, but possibly 30 years was another story.
I think the culture changed in the mid to late-80's, and people became more snobby, selfish and indifferent to those around them.
It is also a complete myth that country people are friendlier than city people. They may say G'day, but keep there distance beyond basic pleasantries, often because they don't know how.
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Old 04-18-2011, 05:51 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek40 View Post
I would say there is little difference to 20 years ago, but possibly 30 years was another story.
I think the culture changed in the mid to late-80's, and people became more snobby, selfish and indifferent to those around them.
It is also a complete myth that country people are friendlier than city people. They may say G'day, but keep there distance beyond basic pleasantries, often because they don't know how.
Interesting, just going by TV etc the 1970s and 80s don't really seem like a very friendly time, while the 50s are portrayed as being very friendly but also ignorant/racist/sexist.etc.

Country folk will tend to say g'day etc more, and I do notice more smiles and less frowns vs the city, but it also depends alot on where in the country you are and locals vs refugees from the big smoke.
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Old 04-18-2011, 08:32 AM
 
Location: PA
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I think this is a worldwide phenomenon and not isolated to a few countries. Generally, according to sociologists anyway, as a society advances technologically, the rat race gets bigger, and people will generally shut themselves out from anyone else. We go from a Gemeinschaft type society to a Gesellschaft type. It's part of the evolutionary process of society. TVs and cell phones also serve to disconnect people more and more. I don't know about over there but here in the U.S., all I ever see is 20 somethings and teens just twiddling their thumbs away on their cell phones, being oblivious to what's going on around them. No one talks anymore, people just tweet and text all day long as their form of communication.
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Old 04-18-2011, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
I think this is a worldwide phenomenon and not isolated to a few countries. Generally, according to sociologists anyway, as a society advances technologically, the rat race gets bigger, and people will generally shut themselves out from anyone else. We go from a Gemeinschaft type society to a Gesellschaft type. It's part of the evolutionary process of society. TVs and cell phones also serve to disconnect people more and more. I don't know about over there but here in the U.S., all I ever see is 20 somethings and teens just twiddling their thumbs away on their cell phones, being oblivious to what's going on around them. No one talks anymore, people just tweet and text all day long as their form of communication.
Same here. Ambling along, oblivious to where they're going, or whose way they're getting in. Everyone else is supposed to do the dodging and weaving around them because they're off in tweet land, boring everyone with the minutiae of their lives. I wish they'd move to the side.

As far as the topic, I have found that Australians will have almost a wariness towards a stranger who goes up to them. And it can take a minute or so before they warm up. I find Americans and Canadians thaw out much quicker, and many don't even need to defrost in the first place, they're warm right off.

Out in the burbs, older people will almost always say good morning or hello when you pass them on the sidewalk. By "older", I mean 40's and up. It seems the older they are, the friendlier and more talkative they are. Dog owners in the park are naturally very friendly and approachable.
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Old 04-18-2011, 07:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
Hard to say. I got sucker punched off of a bar stool in Sydney 35 years ago...
these days you'd get glassed

I dunno Trimac, I kinda agree with you.

Growing up in outer south eastern suburbs of Melbourne, when I'd go for a walk, passing someone else always a "hello" was said, people were more patient, kind etc.

Living in inner Sydney - I don't know my neighbours, I had one old couple across from me (70+)- the wife was struggling a little & was shocked when I offered to carry her shopping in for her - even more shocked when I pointed out where I lived, and let them know if they need anything to just let me know.... she said she'd lived in the building for a long time and no one had even said hello let alone offered to help. Quite sad.

Regarding shopping & being at checkout.... the cashiers don't even say "how are you" anymore...
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Old 04-19-2011, 05:24 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ozgal View Post
these days you'd get glassed

I dunno Trimac, I kinda agree with you.

Growing up in outer south eastern suburbs of Melbourne, when I'd go for a walk, passing someone else always a "hello" was said, people were more patient, kind etc.

Living in inner Sydney - I don't know my neighbours, I had one old couple across from me (70+)- the wife was struggling a little & was shocked when I offered to carry her shopping in for her - even more shocked when I pointed out where I lived, and let them know if they need anything to just let me know.... she said she'd lived in the building for a long time and no one had even said hello let alone offered to help. Quite sad.

Regarding shopping & being at checkout.... the cashiers don't even say "how are you" anymore...
Yes, even when you strike up a yarn with old ladies they think you are a really charming young person, which is a nice feeling, but I definitely get the impression they feel they are ignored and devalued in this society.

Sydney seems incredibly divided by where you live. Ever seen Cedar Boys? Kind of average film, but it kind of underlines the 'divide' between say rich Anglos in the eastern suburbs and north shore, and less well off ethnics in much of the southwestern and western suburbs. The same probably applies to poor Anglos in places like Blacktown or Mt Druitt.
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Old 04-19-2011, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Australia
121 posts, read 136,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
I think this is a worldwide phenomenon and not isolated to a few countries. Generally, according to sociologists anyway, as a society advances technologically, the rat race gets bigger, and people will generally shut themselves out from anyone else. We go from a Gemeinschaft type society to a Gesellschaft type. It's part of the evolutionary process of society. TVs and cell phones also serve to disconnect people more and more. I don't know about over there but here in the U.S., all I ever see is 20 somethings and teens just twiddling their thumbs away on their cell phones, being oblivious to what's going on around them. No one talks anymore, people just tweet and text all day long as their form of communication.
Soooo True...the more connected we are, the more disconnected we become. It's like the person with 5000 plus friends on facebook yet is the loneliest person in town.

A friend of mine, who works as an urban town planner, contends that many communities have lost their soul....sadly, so have the residents.
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Old 04-19-2011, 06:35 PM
 
11,439 posts, read 6,069,063 times
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Yes, even when you strike up a yarn with old ladies they think you are a really charming young person, which is a nice feeling, but I definitely get the impression they feel they are ignored and devalued in this society.

Sydney seems incredibly divided by where you live. Ever seen Cedar Boys? Kind of average film, but it kind of underlines the 'divide' between say rich Anglos in the eastern suburbs and north shore, and less well off ethnics in much of the southwestern and western suburbs. The same probably applies to poor Anglos in places like Blacktown or Mt Druitt.
Definitely - It seems that younger people can't communicate with the older citizens of their community. when I worked in retail at the local shopping center, the older ladies just wanted a chat. Sure, hearing about their grandkids wasn't exactly riveting -- however seeing their excitement was nice.

That is one thing I really noticed, the divide. I have seen cedar boys -- and the only time I've gone out west was to the NAB cup game at Blacktown/Rooty Hill.... its very different to where I am living.... I didn't really feel this divide in Melbourne - sure there are affluent and less affluent areas, but I didnt feel it so strongly .... it really seems to matter where you're from here.
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