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Old 01-15-2012, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Scottsdale, AZ
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Default reputation of Tasmania to Aussies....

I got to wondering what the rep of Tasmania to other Australians is....hoping to hear the true situation and the not-true-but-thought-to-be-true situation...(country bumpkins, trashy poor folk, regular middle class, snobs, or what?).....thanks a lot

hoping you all are staying cool down there!.....
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Old 01-15-2012, 03:03 PM
 
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Well, until we visited there a few months back, I must admit that I also thought that Tasmanians were , well, a little 'slow'. All those jokes about the State being full of 2-headed people who are 'friendly' with sheep etc. But after visiting I must say my wife and I really love the 'apple isle' and its people. Much more sophisticated than we expected, if a little insular and the food, wine and beer are the State's best kept secrets. While their red wines are not that full-bodied (apart from their pinots), their whites, especially the sav-blancs are as good as and very similar to the Marlborough NZ ones. Fesh produce everywhere and the beef is exceptional. We got the impression that Tasmanians feel just a little smug about the whole island. And the driving is fabulous in the country areas; roads in pretty good shape and scenery all over the place. We have begun to understand why so many 'mainlanders' have upped stakes and taken up residence down there. We shall return. Great place!
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Old 01-15-2012, 04:29 PM
 
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West Virginia. Applachia.

Until you see it for yourself and all West Virginia stereotyps are forgotten.
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Old 01-15-2012, 09:20 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,693 posts, read 17,341,671 times
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There are those 'feral' type people. In Hobart I was harassed on the street by a gang of youths (actually just one, his friends were apologetic about his behaviour) who wanted to fight with me for no reason. Never got that anywhere else. Most Tasmanians are very friendly though. 'Feral' can also mean tree-huggers. I guess the simplistic view is Tasmanians are divided into the redneck locals (i.e. descendants of convicts, lol just kidding) and the urban tree-changers, tree-huggers (the other type of feral) and other assorted greenies.
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Old 01-15-2012, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Scottsdale, AZ
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never heard of "urban tree-changer"....would that be the opposite of a tree-hugger?.....
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Old 01-15-2012, 10:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azdr0710 View Post
never heard of "urban tree-changer"....would that be the opposite of a tree-hugger?.....
A tree-changer is a seachanger who moves to somewhere not by the sea.
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Old 01-16-2012, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Scottsdale, AZ
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wow....had to look up all this tree-change/seachange stuff...does seem to be an Australian term: (from wiki)

A seachange (or sea change) is an Australian term which describes a form of human migration that involves individuals abandoning city living in favour of a perceived 'easier life' in rural coastal communities. The term was popularised by the popular ABC TV television series SeaChange, which triggered the phenomenon of many city-dwellers mimicking the drama's protagonist's escape from urban life.[1] The result of this phenomenon (known as the 'sea change effect') is a rapid boom in tourism and real estate development in coastal Australia, particularly in New South Wales. A similar term, treechange, describes the movement of urbanites to the countryside.
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Old 01-16-2012, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Newcastle NSW Australia
1,508 posts, read 887,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BCC_1 View Post
A tree-changer is a seachanger who moves to somewhere not by the sea.
It also includes places like Bellingen in Northern NSW, which is closer to the sea than many ""westies"",ie people in the western suburbs of Sydney live.
Basically anywhere that is probably >20K's from the sea can qualify.
On the original subject of Tasmania, I think many Aussies see it as a wilderness area, with unique wildlife and slightly backwards people.
At least they can laugh at themselves, I can recall at Launceston Airport a stuffed toy (a Tassie Devil from memory) with two heads, and a slogan on the back stating "two heads are better than one".
Tassie is seen as somewhere you go to at least once in your life, hire a car and do the whole island type thing in a week or so.
We saw people at Cradle Mountain for instance, that we had only just seen in Hobart and/or Coles Bay (Freycinet National Park)! It seems everyone was doing the same thing.
Very few people see it as a place they would want to live, but some heat intolerant people over-react and move there for the cooler weather.
All in all I was very impressed with the state, and would definitely go back, but stay in one spot and not do the whole tour thing.
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Old 01-16-2012, 05:15 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,693 posts, read 17,341,671 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek40 View Post
It also includes places like Bellingen in Northern NSW, which is closer to the sea than many ""westies"",ie people in the western suburbs of Sydney live.
Basically anywhere that is probably >20K's from the sea can qualify.
On the original subject of Tasmania, I think many Aussies see it as a wilderness area, with unique wildlife and slightly backwards people.
At least they can laugh at themselves, I can recall at Launceston Airport a stuffed toy (a Tassie Devil from memory) with two heads, and a slogan on the back stating "two heads are better than one".
Tassie is seen as somewhere you go to at least once in your life, hire a car and do the whole island type thing in a week or so.
We saw people at Cradle Mountain for instance, that we had only just seen in Hobart and/or Coles Bay (Freycinet National Park)! It seems everyone was doing the same thing.
Very few people see it as a place they would want to live, but some heat intolerant people over-react and move there for the cooler weather.
All in all I was very impressed with the state, and would definitely go back, but stay in one spot and not do the whole tour thing.
All Bello, spent a week there and fell in love with the place, such a cool town in the rainforest. Like Nimbin but quieter and less kitschy.

I would personally love to buy a rural property somewhere in Tasmania someday. It's that beautiful.
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Old 01-17-2012, 03:08 PM
 
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The whole Tasmaniams are bumpkins, two-headed, slow, inbred etc are just (silly) running jokes, like implying NZers have sex with sheep or saying Victorians are a bunch of blouse wearing prancing pansies who watch AFL. Tasmania is exactly like any other part of Australia.

The differences in culture across American states are much more pronounced than in Australia. Here we might have a few local idioms and a little rivalry between sporting codes, and occasionally a few jokes about other states (e.g. "Queensland is truly God's country but why he chose to fill it with *&^%heads remains a mystery"), but the people are all basically the same wherever they live (yes, even the Tasmanians). Australia is a very large country area wise (about the same size as the US), but it's much smaller in real terms because the majority of the country is empty. People tend to have either lived in or at least visited more than one state, usually several. People don't have different accents, cultural differences, or very different lives that are state specific. Different places definitely have a different feel, of course, but the personality differences are minor.

I can absolutely guarantee nobody (well no one with an ounce of sense) actually sees Tasmania or the people there as a backwards place or as a particularly 'wilderness-y' area. I think lots of Aussies are aware it's beautiful there, and of course cold, but every state has gorgeous wilderness regions. Part of Australian humour is we tease a lot.
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