U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Australia and New Zealand
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-19-2012, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
5,646 posts, read 2,679,918 times
Reputation: 2998
Quote:
Originally Posted by nzrugby View Post
Nope, we do not have her photo everywhere, no need when we have only had one Monarch for sixty years.
Aus is not a flag flying Nation in comparison to the USA, I noticed there was a lot of photos of the latest president in government buildings.
Sherman could have given the British lessons in being tyrannical, and obviously children in the US are not taught how much support the rebels had from certain sectors of British politics.

But it does seem that American politicians are confused, accepting knighthoods dished out by British politicians, do you not have a law against that ?
What does that have to do with anything whether she has been on the throne for one year vs 60.
As our head of state, the Presidents photo is in every govt building or at least 99% of them. Pretty much the US Constitution modeled the President on the Monarch such as Commander of all Armed Forces, veto power, pardons, appointing Supreme Court judges, executive power, etc. etc.

I believe you are referring to the Emolument Clause in the US Constitution. It simply states that the US Govt is not allowed to grant titles of nobility. Our Constitution also forbids states from granting titles of nobility. It states that no office holder (while serving) accept a title of nobility from a foreign govt without congressional approval. Americans are only allowed to receive certain weak knighthoods. You will never hear an American called "Sir" as in the UK, Australia, Canada, etc. After the US Revolution Americans considered titles like that vulgar and associated them with corruption associated with British rule.

As you will read if you care to on many US Civil War forums, almost any legitimate historian considers the American Civil War a bit different than the American War of Independence. The huge glaring difference being this: how many members of Parliment did Virginia have? Pennsylvania? New York? They had zilch, nada, zero. And when asked if they could, the door was slammed in their face. Big diff between an internal rebellion being put down by a legitimate government, and a rebellion against a foreign, colonial power, that granted no voice in their law making doncha think?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-19-2012, 10:42 PM
 
Location: The Downunderverse
487 posts, read 285,780 times
Reputation: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
ive relatives in BC which is the most british part of canada , ive been to canada , canada is much less british - royalist than australia , a comparison of both nations flags should itself tell you this

both are in the happenyplace compared to new zealand when it comes to royal sycophancy
I disagree I think Canadians are much more royalist than Australians but they're more like toothless monarchists because they don't like the monarchy for what it is they only like it because it's not American which imo is a flimsy reason to keep the monarchy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2012, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
5,646 posts, read 2,679,918 times
Reputation: 2998
Not sure if it was because of the closer distance, or because she realized Canada uses her as a buffer, but I agree with you. I think she has visited Canada much more than Australia or NZ. Seems everytime you turn around a member of the royal family is in Canada. Maybe they just miss the dear old British North America of 1775.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2012, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
9,546 posts, read 10,224,387 times
Reputation: 3703
Australia is certainly much more British in culture and custom than Canada is.

Not sure if this makes Australians more or less pro-monarchy than Canadians. As others have alluded to, many Canadians cherish the monarchy because they see it as a distinguishing feature vis-à-vis the U.S.

On the other hand, there is a big chunk of Canada (Quebec) which makes up close to a quarter of the country and which is decidedly non-monarchist, so this also enters into the equation.

On the whole, it could be true that English-speaking Canadians may be more monarchist than Australians...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2012, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,801 posts, read 4,838,644 times
Reputation: 17567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Australia is certainly much more British in culture and custom than Canada is.

Not sure if this makes Australians more or less pro-monarchy than Canadians. As others have alluded to, many Canadians cherish the monarchy because they see it as a distinguishing feature vis-à-vis the U.S.

On the other hand, there is a big chunk of Canada (Quebec) which makes up close to a quarter of the country and which is decidedly non-monarchist, so this also enters into the equation.

On the whole, it could be true that English-speaking Canadians may be more monarchist than Australians...
I agree. I've been in Canada for the past couple of months and around the time of the Jubilee there was little of the angst over the Monarchy here versus what I've experienced in Oz. There was much positive news about it, with newspapers writing up lots of information and fluffy reports about the Queen, her reign and other gossip and chit-chat about Royalty. Same for the TV news media. Nobody grouching about the Monarchy or becoming a Republic, or if there were, they were drowned out by everyone else. The Monarchy it seems, is not as big a deal here. Canadians waved their flags, brought out the teapots and scones, watched the Jubilee, then moved on with life. There's too many other important things to fuss about here - crazy Federal budgets, hockey, student protests, shootings, body parts being posted in the mail, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2012, 06:19 PM
 
1,482 posts, read 1,032,206 times
Reputation: 820
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
What does that have to do with anything whether she has been on the throne for one year vs 60.
As our head of state, the Presidents photo is in every govt building or at least 99% of them. Pretty much the US Constitution modeled the President on the Monarch such as Commander of all Armed Forces, veto power, pardons, appointing Supreme Court judges, executive power, etc. etc.

I believe you are referring to the Emolument Clause in the US Constitution. It simply states that the US Govt is not allowed to grant titles of nobility. Our Constitution also forbids states from granting titles of nobility. It states that no office holder (while serving) accept a title of nobility from a foreign govt without congressional approval. Americans are only allowed to receive certain weak knighthoods. You will never hear an American called "Sir" as in the UK, Australia, Canada, etc. After the US Revolution Americans considered titles like that vulgar and associated them with corruption associated with British rule.

As you will read if you care to on many US Civil War forums, almost any legitimate historian considers the American Civil War a bit different than the American War of Independence. The huge glaring difference being this: how many members of Parliment did Virginia have? Pennsylvania? New York? They had zilch, nada, zero. And when asked if they could, the door was slammed in their face. Big diff between an internal rebellion being put down by a legitimate government, and a rebellion against a foreign, colonial power, that granted no voice in their law making doncha think?
Strange, Eisenhower as a serving US general accepted the Order of Merit from King George VI, one down from the very top award and a personal gift from the Monarch with politicians having no say.
You were saying Americans only accepted weak Knighthoods ?
How could he accept it as a serving General ? and no it is NOT a military decoration.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2012, 06:48 PM
 
1,482 posts, read 1,032,206 times
Reputation: 820
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Not sure if it was because of the closer distance, or because she realized Canada uses her as a buffer, but I agree with you. I think she has visited Canada much more than Australia or NZ. Seems everytime you turn around a member of the royal family is in Canada. Maybe they just miss the dear old British North America of 1775.
Every time one turns around a member of the royal family is in the USA, it seems a lot of Americans are confused in wanting the old enemy in their country.
And what on earth is this bloke doing saluting Harry when he has no head gear on and cannot return it ?
Prince Harry At West Point: Target Practice, Helicopters, Bonding With Cadets (PHOTOS)

What, more Royals in California, are you sure you Americans are not missing having a Monarch ?
But doubtful if HM would want the USA back, she would not fancy Kansas.
Royals waving to loyal American subjects

Will & Kate Headline BAFTA 'Brits To Watch' Event (PHOTOS)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2012, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
9,546 posts, read 10,224,387 times
Reputation: 3703
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
I agree. I've been in Canada for the past couple of months and around the time of the Jubilee there was little of the angst over the Monarchy here versus what I've experienced in Oz. There was much positive news about it, with newspapers writing up lots of information and fluffy reports about the Queen, her reign and other gossip and chit-chat about Royalty. Same for the TV news media. Nobody grouching about the Monarchy or becoming a Republic, or if there were, they were drowned out by everyone else. The Monarchy it seems, is not as big a deal here. Canadians waved their flags, brought out the teapots and scones, watched the Jubilee, then moved on with life. There's too many other important things to fuss about here - crazy Federal budgets, hockey, student protests, shootings, body parts being posted in the mail, etc.
One thing you don't have in Canada compared to Australia is the whole hate related to the "pom" or "bloody pom" insult. People from England or Britain in general are not an issue in Canada and I've almost never heard people say negative things about them. Whereas in Australia, well... you know.

Strangely enough, there is almost a direct equivalent to the Australian "pom" thingy in Quebec with people from France. The historical term is "maudit français" (damned Frenchman).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2012, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
5,646 posts, read 2,679,918 times
Reputation: 2998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
One thing you don't have in Canada compared to Australia is the whole hate related to the "pom" or "bloody pom" insult. People from England or Britain in general are not an issue in Canada and I've almost never heard people say negative things about them. Whereas in Australia, well... you know.

Strangely enough, there is almost a direct equivalent to the Australian "pom" thingy in Quebec with people from France. The historical term is "maudit français" (damned Frenchman).

Are Australians really serious about that though? I've always heard it was just joking.
I have a good friend lives here now but moved from Liverpool to Sydney. He loved Australia and always said it was just just **** taking. He did say however that he voted to keep the Monarchy at the last referendum cause he didn't want Britain to lose a special connection with Australia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2012, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
9,546 posts, read 10,224,387 times
Reputation: 3703
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Are Australians really serious about that though? I've always heard it was just joking.
I have a good friend lives here now but moved from Liverpool to Sydney. He loved Australia and always said it was just just **** taking. He did say however that he voted to keep the Monarchy at the last referendum cause he didn't want Britain to lose a special connection with Australia.
It is more often than not good-natured but not always. In Quebec it is very much the same FYI. In any event, I think it affects some people more than others. Some people brush it off - others cannot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Australia and New Zealand
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:21 PM.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top