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Old 02-23-2013, 05:37 AM
 
2,377 posts, read 2,859,413 times
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went down to Surfer's today and on a very superficial level the immediate beach area could've been Santa Monica but the social scene and especially a block in from the beach was much more "east coast" where i got tastes of Miami Beach, Ft. Lauderdale, a little Myrtle Beach, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
The trend is a lot of people moving into the city and inner suburbs. A lot of the people living there are foreigners, though.
You can definitely see a lot of new development in the inner-ring neighborhoods in Brisbane but I haven't seen much new residential in the CBD and I would imagine it would be difficult as the office market is already pretty tight so there's not much incentive for office-to-condo conversions (as has been the case in Philadelphia for a decade now with it's soft office market).

Last edited by drive carephilly; 02-23-2013 at 06:06 AM..
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Old 02-24-2013, 01:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
Brisbane reminds me of a hodge-podge of a bunch of different cities from the Carolinas. Obviously the architecture and flora are going to be different but New Farm felt like parts of Charleston. West End more like parts of Asheville. Driving around the northern suburbs sometimes feels like Charlotte or Raleigh.

The river and CBD of Brisbane are distinct - the downtowns of Australian cities are an unusual animal to me (coming from the eastern US) because they're generally really clean, dense, bustling during the day (lots of shopping) but very few people live in them - which would be like a lot of southern/western downtowns in the US but then those US downtowns are usually dominated by parking lots and aren't typically bustling during the day either.
Now, it's changed. They live in Downtown Sydney, Melbourne, and Brisbane. They recently completed a lot of highrise housing in the last 15 years. The vitality of those cities are still work in progress during the nights and weekends, albeit much improved since 1995.
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Old 03-01-2013, 07:54 AM
 
Location: SoCal
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No where in Australia has a similar vibe to anywhere in California, Except maybe a bit of San Francisco (by far the worst place in California)

California has better weather, much nicer scenery and better urban planning

Just go there and see for your self if you don't believe me

I constantly tavel between Sydney & California
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:00 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,744,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yowps3 View Post
No where in Australia has a similar vibe to anywhere in California, Except maybe a bit of San Francisco (by far the worst place in California)

California has better weather, much nicer scenery and better urban planning

Just go there and see for your self if you don't believe me

I constantly tavel between Sydney & California
San Diego is definitely the most Australian city in America I went to.
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:40 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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I draw a near-total blank when I think of urban Australia.

Yes, I know they all have downtowns with skyscrapers. I'm more interested in how the neighborhoods and suburbs are like....how they differ from the US & Canada.

Are we talking like US or Canadian cities or are they different in some way.

Is postwar suburbia like here in the states...shopping malls, commercial strips, and split levels on subdivisions with cul-de-sacs and curving streets?
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:56 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,744,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
I draw a near-total blank when I think of urban Australia.

Yes, I know they all have downtowns with skyscrapers. I'm more interested in how the neighborhoods and suburbs are like....how they differ from the US & Canada.

Are we talking like US or Canadian cities or are they different in some way.

Is postwar suburbia like here in the states...shopping malls, commercial strips, and split levels on subdivisions with cul-de-sacs and curving streets?
Yep, pretty similar overall. I feel our downtowns are generally stronger though and our cities are more centralised. The difference are more aesthetic/subtle.
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Old 03-01-2013, 09:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
I draw a near-total blank when I think of urban Australia.

Yes, I know they all have downtowns with skyscrapers. I'm more interested in how the neighborhoods and suburbs are like....how they differ from the US & Canada.
Outside of Melbourne and Sydney you won't find urban neighborhoods like you do in the northeastern US or Canada.

You just don't see this sort of thing here . . . 1800 Pine St, Philadelphia, PA, United States - Google Maps

The suburbs here and there have a lot of similarities but you just don't find 70,000 people living downtown anywhere in Australia and the people who do live downtown here are mostly in high rises.

The cities here would be more like Denver, San Diego, the Bay Area (not including SF) and parts of LA, Seattle and Vancouver. Sydney & Melbourne have some neighborhoods that might compare to parts of SF or Chicago.
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Old 03-04-2013, 05:13 AM
 
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Kapiish, capisce... third time's a charm. Capish.
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Old 12-17-2018, 02:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Babyboy_2012 View Post
I don't know if any Australian citys are compareable to American citys. American (major) cities are far more populated. And secondly, (for the most part) American citys are very diverse in people, culture and food. Australia is pretty much on a one way track, while America is a network of tracks leading to many different things. kapiish??
Not only is this post arrogant, itís also stupid.

Australia has more of a percentage of overseas born people than America so you could claim Australia is actually more diverse. Also, in the last 20 years, Australiaís culinary scene/cuisine has become one of the best in the world thanks to the multicultural community and an abundance of diverse cuisines available (Italian, Greek, Thai, Chinese, Japanese, French, Mexican).

Australia is anything but a one way track, your thinly veiled insult is inaccurate and misleading. Itís a very beautiful place that is constantly evolving and guess what? It can harmoniously accomodate people of different races.
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Old 12-17-2018, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Placitas, New Mexico
1,133 posts, read 1,941,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoneNative View Post
Which U.S. cities are most comparable to Australian cities? If you could "twin" up Australian cities with American ones, how would you do it?

I'm specifically curious which Australian city is most like Denver, CO.

Thanks.


I think this is amusing. If you have ever been to Australia or even have seen pictures of it's cities, you would k now instantly that there is NO Denver equivalent. At all.

As for other equivalents-- Australia's cities resemble American cities more than European or Asian but have their own distinct character. Maybe Perth, a tad like San Diego, or Melbourne somewhat like Boston. But i'm hard pressed to name an American city that compares with Sydney. And Adelaide like a U.S. Midwest city, bland and unimposing. And if you moved the Gold Coast right up close to downtown Brisbane, then maybe Brisbane and Miami.
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