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Old 12-19-2018, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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They need to do the census by ethnicity and race as well, not just from where people were born.
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Old 12-19-2018, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgtheone View Post
They need to do the census by ethnicity and race as well, not just from where people were born.
They ask you to nominate your heritage and you can nominate multiple heritages. Which is appropriate, keeping in mind that the question is optional. As it is illegal to discriminate on the grounds of race, there should be no need to collect data on that. In any case, many people have a very mixed racial background.
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Old 12-19-2018, 06:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buddybuddybabe View Post
Well 10 percent of Korean, 10 percent of Chinese, 10 percent of Indian = 30 percent. So the remaining 30 percent could also be of some other decent other than Australian to make a total of 60 percent foreign born.
A total of 56.3% born overseas in 2016 census.
India 11%
China 10%
Korea.7.7%
Nepal.2.9%
Viet 2.4%
HK 1.7%
Leb. 1.6%
Phil 1.4%
Malay 1%


Italian the only one missing of non Asian birthplaces in above category that comes in at about 1.5%


It does make for an interesting and diverse mix in Asian cultures in Strathfield but still differs from LA or NY or London make up.
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Old 12-19-2018, 06:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by jgtheone View Post
They need to do the census by ethnicity and race as well, not just from where people were born.
Already done. For example we can find the overwhelming per cent of Malaysians are off Chinese ethnicity compared to Malay, Indian or other races.
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Old 12-21-2018, 08:54 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
What reminds you of LA in Adelaide?

The fact that its surrounded by parkland? the large stock of classic buildings? Good public transport around the CBD? No pollution? People who will say Good Morning or smile when you stroll about on a lazy Sunday morning?
I can see the Adelaide and LA comparison. In fact I've heard of it before.

It has nothing to do with anything of what you mentioned, because LA does not have a large stock of classic buildings. Compared to NYC, LA is mostly a modern/contemporary city as far as its built environment goes. No, the similarities between LA & Adelaide lie mostly in the topography/geography. Both cities are coastal, and have a mountain range that surrounds or borders them. They are both "flanked" between an ocean and the mountains. Adelaide, like LA, is mostly flat on the plains until you get into the hilly suburbs towards the mountains and these parts of the Adelaide Hills look like the winding roads of Mullholland Dr./Laurel Canyon. The towns in the Adelaide Hills, though, are greener than LA and vaguely look like towns outside of San Francisco. They are heavily suburban cities, and both are highly car dependent. They both have very hot, dry summers. There's just a similar "feel" in the bushy, dry, barren terrain.

But Adelaide's CBD is nothing like Downtown LA. The similarities stop here: once you get into the city centre, Adelaide turns into a kind of a Midwestern meets New England-type of city. Long, wide avenues, with old Victorian/Gothic architecture. I can't rally compare inner-city Adelaide to anywhere I've ever visited in the world...it's vaguely like Philadelphia with its wide streets and old buildings, but even that comparison doesn't sit well with me.

Someone said Perth reminded them of San Diego. I cannot see this. To me, Perth is an Austin-Houston-Dallas hybrid...isolated, hot, suburban, flat, lots of freeways, tall glass/steel skyscrapers...in fact, I believe Houston & Perth are "sister cities".
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Old 12-21-2018, 11:20 AM
 
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Adelaide/Melbourne and Philadelphia
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Old 12-25-2018, 09:39 PM
 
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Would it be tone deaf to say Sydney is comparable to New York City? Perhaps a better way to describe Sydney would be as a San Francisco-NYC-Toronto hybrid although the Sydney & San Fran comparisons are overblown/not very strong (SF is far more hilly, and foggier).
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Old 12-26-2018, 01:38 AM
 
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I personally don't see much to compare Sydney and New York , outside of their national status with regards to relevance.
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Old 12-26-2018, 04:15 AM
 
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I think Australian cities work better when compared with Canadian ones as it’s easier to draw parallels.

Sydney and Toronto
Melbourne and Montreal
Canberra and Ottawa
Brisbane and Vancouver

When it comes to the Gold Coast, there’s no real equivalent in Canada, so I think Miami works best here.
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Old 12-26-2018, 08:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
I think Australian cities work better when compared with Canadian ones as itís easier to draw parallels.

Sydney and Toronto
Melbourne and Montreal
Canberra and Ottawa
Brisbane and Vancouver

When it comes to the Gold Coast, thereís no real equivalent in Canada, so I think Miami works best here.
Monreal and Melbourne? Not similar at all. In fact Toronto was super similar to Melbourne ; both have street cars or trams (whatever you want to call it), lots of high-rise apartments, Lake Ontario is kinda similar to Port Phillip bay, both have a very big hipster scene.
I have heard Vancouver is similar to Sydney; the Harbour, they both have a similar bridge, very outdoor cities, a very high Asian population.
Ottawa is more beautiful than Canberra. Ottawa is a bilingual city which makes it more interesting too.
Calgary =Perth (very rich cities with natural resources, infamous for its dullness)
Brisbane? Canít compare it with any city in Canada really
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