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Old 11-24-2007, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Highland Heights, Ohio
3 posts, read 17,808 times
Reputation: 15

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My husband and I are thinking of moving to Australia. I have a Master's in Community Health Education and will probably be relying mostly on my work. How to I go about finding work/ becoming an Australian citizen? Is is difficult? Should I go to school there and then try to assimulate? Thanks in advanced.

Last edited by arj00; 11-24-2007 at 10:23 PM.. Reason: Typo

 
Old 11-25-2007, 12:20 AM
 
4,285 posts, read 14,148,360 times
Reputation: 3849
That's quite a choice ahead of you: selecting whether to move to Australia or Colorado.

Try this link for Australian immigration information:

Department of Immigration and Citizenship


Good Luck
 
Old 11-27-2007, 10:49 PM
 
12 posts, read 35,765 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by arj00 View Post
My husband and I are thinking of moving to Australia. I have a Master's in Community Health Education and will probably be relying mostly on my work. How to I go about finding work/ becoming an Australian citizen? Is is difficult? Should I go to school there and then try to assimulate? Thanks in advanced.
I gotta tell ya, Australians really frown upon immigrants to their country. They like keeping Australia pure and white and Aussie.

Trust me... you don't want to become a citizen of that country... they're very insular... very into their own culture. They're pretty close-minded, in their own weird way.

I didn't particularly care for Australia, and you'll encounter so much anti-Americanism, it'll drive you crazy.

Don't be fooled by the television commercials and the Chamber of Commerce fantasies. It is not what you see on television and in films.
 
Old 03-31-2008, 06:27 AM
 
2,421 posts, read 6,216,732 times
Reputation: 3806
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhoenixSugar View Post
I gotta tell ya, Australians really frown upon immigrants to their country. They like keeping Australia pure and white and Aussie.

Trust me... you don't want to become a citizen of that country... they're very insular... very into their own culture. They're pretty close-minded, in their own weird way.

I didn't particularly care for Australia, and you'll encounter so much anti-Americanism, it'll drive you crazy.

Don't be fooled by the television commercials and the Chamber of Commerce fantasies. It is not what you see on television and in films.

It's not fair! to view us negatively....As We may have problems?, But We're not as insular as you think?, We've moved on from the days of the "White Australia" policy and quite like Americans and many other foreigners.

Last edited by Kangaroofarmer; 03-31-2008 at 07:22 AM..
 
Old 03-31-2008, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Texas
718 posts, read 2,116,462 times
Reputation: 423
We just got back from Sydney where we had a lengthy discussion with an immigration attorney on just this. They have the "points" system much like New Zealand does and also a list of jobs that are in high demand. The immigration attorney said the government is starting to get very strict on immigrants to their country, and frown upon giving any job to an outsider that an Australian citizen might perform.

With that being said, if you can find a company willing to offer you a job, it might be a little bit easier, but getting the actual work visa is not that easy though. The company essentially "sponsors" you. There are things the company has to do and things you must do. It basically involves a lot of money (over $5000) in attorney fees and filing fees and can take anywhere from 6 to 18 months. You or the company has to provide your own insurance and you must pay for any school fees if there are children involved (attorney said that ranges in the thousands yearly).

We had pretty much ruled out Australia before we had the meeting. We just happen to like New Zealand better. If you are interested, PM me and I can give you the name of the attorney in Sydney if you would like additional information.
 
Old 03-31-2008, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Hong Kong
339 posts, read 1,058,343 times
Reputation: 245
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhoenixSugar View Post
I gotta tell ya, Australians really frown upon immigrants to their country. They like keeping Australia pure and white and Aussie.

Trust me... you don't want to become a citizen of that country... they're very insular... very into their own culture. They're pretty close-minded, in their own weird way.

I didn't particularly care for Australia, and you'll encounter so much anti-Americanism, it'll drive you crazy.

Don't be fooled by the television commercials and the Chamber of Commerce fantasies. It is not what you see on television and in films.
Wow, what a terrible experience with Australia you must have had! Australia frowns upon immigrants ...that is completely untrue. You have racism everywhere you go but as an example, about 1/3 of the Sydney population was born in another country.

As for anti-americanism, I think some people go out looking for that to prove themselves right. Your own attitude will encourage the very behaviour you seek.

I'm not Australian but I think Oz has to be one of the best countries one could be lucky enough to live in.
 
Old 04-01-2008, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Texas
718 posts, read 2,116,462 times
Reputation: 423
I found most people to be incredibly friendly and accommodating. I also found most are not anti-American, they are anti-George Bush, and tend to ask a lot of questions about him and his policies. Usually, a simple "I didn't vote for him" will suffice and the conversation changes directions. You have a few (mostly young, cocky guys), who will approach you, usually when out at a club or bar, who is intent on stirring up any kind of trouble. Those people are everywhere.
 
Old 04-01-2008, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Subarctic maritime Melbourne
5,054 posts, read 5,499,142 times
Reputation: 2836
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhoenixSugar View Post
I gotta tell ya, Australians really frown upon immigrants to their country. They like keeping Australia pure and white and Aussie.

Trust me... you don't want to become a citizen of that country... they're very insular... very into their own culture. They're pretty close-minded, in their own weird way.

I didn't particularly care for Australia, and you'll encounter so much anti-Americanism, it'll drive you crazy.

Don't be fooled by the television commercials and the Chamber of Commerce fantasies. It is not what you see on television and in films.
relax dude, we're not Anti-American. In truth, Australians are friendly people and are willing to help you with whatever you need helping with. I myself am actually Hungarian, yet I always found Aussies to be a wonderful peoples and if you ever visit our country, You'll find you'll get a smile from the attendants at the grocery shops and fast food joints ontop of a friendly "Hi how are you".

I am technically a foreigner myself, yet I've never felt out of place here.

Here in Melbourne we have huge communities of greeks, asians, americans, etc yet you won't hear about ethnic violence and crap like that ensuing. We all get along and accept each others culture. My best mates at uni are asian and at work, Middle Eastern. Australia accepts people from other cultures. I've also seen many american students but am yet to see any abuse hurled at them.

Go out into the country and you may find people wave at you as they drive past, just as I have on a recent holiday to Kangaroo Island. Don't judge a place you've never been to.

Arj00, don't let one ignoramous put you off what is a genuinely friendly country.

Last edited by §AB; 04-01-2008 at 09:07 PM..
 
Old 04-01-2008, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
38,697 posts, read 45,095,355 times
Reputation: 106816
When we were in Australia we found them to be extremly friendly to Americans. We were treated very very well. Everywhere we went they said they loved Americans. Now the Asians were another story.
I'd live there if I ever had to leave the USA for any reason.
I heard you can get visas for 6 month intervals and you should have a work related need to live there.
 
Old 04-01-2008, 11:44 PM
 
2,421 posts, read 6,216,732 times
Reputation: 3806
Quote:
Originally Posted by statefan View Post
I found most people to be incredibly friendly and accommodating. I also found most are not anti-American, they are anti-George Bush, and tend to ask a lot of questions about him and his policies. Usually, a simple "I didn't vote for him" will suffice and the conversation changes directions. You have a few (mostly young, cocky guys), who will approach you, usually when out at a club or bar, who is intent on stirring up any kind of trouble. Those people are everywhere.
Thats true!, We're not angry at US people Themselves!, We're angry at our Ex Prime Minister (John Howard) and his thenSeemingly blind faith in President Bush....Unfortunately, It comes out in many people as "Anti-American" sentiment, Which it isn't at all! ;D

Last edited by Kangaroofarmer; 04-02-2008 at 12:09 AM..
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