U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Australia and New Zealand
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-14-2014, 02:06 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,783 posts, read 15,328,540 times
Reputation: 2833

Advertisements

Sydney not yet a true global city

While Sydney is of course very prominent and ranked highly in many indices (as the article says), the British urbanist Greg Clark cites Sydney's car-dependent, low density nature, and comparatively poor infrastructure preventing it being truly 'global.' Also it has a lot less high-tech and 'soft' power compared to Toronto, Stockholm etc apparently. More resource based. I think the first two can't really be helped, that's just how Australian cities are. I do agree that Sydney's transport infrastructure isn't 'world class' but I think it's sometimes unfair maligned. I think the transport authority/Victorian government here in Melbourne seems to be doing a better job keeping up with development. Traffic jams in Sydney are atrocious but I think they really need to modernise and upgrade the metro. I also agree that diversification of economy and more innovation in Australia instead of relying on agriculture and mining would be good.

Your thoughts?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-14-2014, 03:02 AM
 
1,100 posts, read 1,319,735 times
Reputation: 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Sydney not yet a true global city

While Sydney is of course very prominent and ranked highly in many indices (as the article says), the British urbanist Greg Clark cites Sydney's car-dependent, low density nature, and comparatively poor infrastructure preventing it being truly 'global.' Also it has a lot less high-tech and 'soft' power compared to Toronto, Stockholm etc apparently. More resource based. I think the first two can't really be helped, that's just how Australian cities are. I do agree that Sydney's transport infrastructure isn't 'world class' but I think it's sometimes unfair maligned.
Your thoughts?
I don't see how the first two of those criteria really are relevant in determining whether a city is "global" or not. Perhaps the urbanist mistakes "European" for "global". But Sydney does have transport infrastructure issues that need to be dealt with. Whether they are, on balance, any more significant than issues faced by cities he does view as "global" is a pretty subjective question.

To me a "global" city is one that is tuned into the global economy and is a melting pot of cultures and ideas. And I don't mean simply focussed on regional, culturally and economically similar, neighbours (i.e. Europe or North American).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2014, 05:25 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,783 posts, read 15,328,540 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
I don't see how the first two of those criteria really are relevant in determining whether a city is "global" or not. Perhaps the urbanist mistakes "European" for "global". But Sydney does have transport infrastructure issues that need to be dealt with. Whether they are, on balance, any more significant than issues faced by cities he does view as "global" is a pretty subjective question.

To me a "global" city is one that is tuned into the global economy and is a melting pot of cultures and ideas. And I don't mean simply focussed on regional, culturally and economically similar, neighbours (i.e. Europe or North American).
Yes exactly. No one questions LA being global. Even greater NYC has suburbs with low-density single home neighbourhoods.

Yes, in terms of demographics Sydney is an extremely global city. It's 38% or so born overseas is one of the highest of any city on the planet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2014, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Australia
242 posts, read 198,122 times
Reputation: 151
Sydney's roads are horrible. Melbourne has twice as many km of freeways, which are also wider with bigger interchanges and there are more planned. The major arterial roads are wider aswell. Melbourne is also arranged in a generally grid pattern making navigation easier.

I've driven in both cities. Melbourne's freeway network to me is significantly more expansive and the freeways and arterial roads are wider than in Sydney.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2014, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,360 posts, read 5,178,606 times
Reputation: 2684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
I don't see how the first two of those criteria really are relevant in determining whether a city is "global" or not. Perhaps the urbanist mistakes "European" for "global". But Sydney does have transport infrastructure issues that need to be dealt with. Whether they are, on balance, any more significant than issues faced by cities he does view as "global" is a pretty subjective question.

To me a "global" city is one that is tuned into the global economy and is a melting pot of cultures and ideas. And I don't mean simply focussed on regional, culturally and economically similar, neighbours (i.e. Europe or North American).
My thoughts exactly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2014, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,783 posts, read 15,328,540 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hells Kitchen View Post
Sydney's roads are horrible. Melbourne has twice as many km of freeways, which are also wider with bigger interchanges and there are more planned. The major arterial roads are wider aswell. Melbourne is also arranged in a generally grid pattern making navigation easier.

I've driven in both cities. Melbourne's freeway network to me is significantly more expansive and the freeways and arterial roads are wider than in Sydney.
Both suffer from congestion but yeah Sydney's is ridiculous. I drove there a bit and once it took me over 2 hours to get near Parramatta to the inner eastern suburbs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Australia and New Zealand
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top