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Old 10-20-2018, 08:29 PM
 
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I think it far from obvious in Australia, Kiwi accents, unless of course pronounced such as obvious examples already given. Far from all have a 'clipped' sound, perhaps longer here, less likely to be at all clear in many cases, unless they tell you so.
Some do sound a little like a 'better' spoken Australian accent. I did find it far easier in New Zealand to spot the difference.
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Old 10-20-2018, 11:25 PM
 
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I was born / grew up in Australia, though my parents were from New Zealand.

The entire time I spent in Australia, everyone thought I had a Kiwi accent.

Move to New Zealand and the first thing I hear? 'Oh, is that an Aussie accent'?

You just can't win haha
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Old 10-21-2018, 02:23 AM
 
Location: NSW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQSunseeker View Post
Been to both numerous times and still can't differentiate the accents.
The South African accent is similar but easier to recognize.
Very occasionally I still have to listen hard for the difference between an SA and Kiwi accent, as they talk in a similar lower tone, but once a few vowels come out it is normally fairly obvious then.
The water also gets muddied the longer someone has been in Australia and/or at what age they came here as well, as the original accents become weaker, no matter what they were initially.
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Old 10-21-2018, 07:36 PM
 
Location: London U.K.
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Originally Posted by ABQSunseeker View Post
Been to both numerous times and still can't differentiate the accents.
The South African accent is similar but easier to recognize.
I hope that Iíve misunderstood you, the Aussie and Kiwi accents have some similarity, but enough differences to make it obvious that they are two slightly different accents.
The Afrikaaner accent, to me at least, bears no likeness whatsoever to the Aussie/Kiwi ones.
Itís as different to my ears as an Illinois accent is to one from Louisiana.
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Old 10-22-2018, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
6,784 posts, read 3,114,451 times
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Originally Posted by SherlockCombs View Post
I was born / grew up in Australia, though my parents were from New Zealand.

The entire time I spent in Australia, everyone thought I had a Kiwi accent.

Move to New Zealand and the first thing I hear? 'Oh, is that an Aussie accent'?

You just can't win haha
Obviously ended up in the middle there lol. I had a european influenced accent for a while as a kid as I was raised by grandparents who arrived by boat to Australia in the 70s but it has mellowed out to a general urban australian accent.
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Old 10-22-2018, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SherlockCombs View Post
I was born / grew up in Australia, though my parents were from New Zealand.

The entire time I spent in Australia, everyone thought I had a Kiwi accent.

Move to New Zealand and the first thing I hear? 'Oh, is that an Aussie accent'?

You just can't win haha




I grew up in England, in a part of Surrey which was 'country' at the time, but is now an outer area of London. I didn't speak like the Queen, but not like a Londoner either. I came to Australia nearly 50 years ago as a 20-year-old.

In spite of using Aussie words and phrases and having lived here nearly 50 years, every new person I meet tells me I still sound English. Yet whenever I visit my mother, who is still in England, she complains about my "awful Australian accent"! She's been complaining about it since my first visit back in 1973!


Back on topic - if you want to find out if someone is an Aussie or a Kiwi, ask them to say the word "sex". Kiwis don't have sex, they have six.
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Old 10-22-2018, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Australia
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Originally Posted by Kobber View Post



I grew up in England, in a part of Surrey which was 'country' at the time, but is now an outer area of London. I didn't speak like the Queen, but not like a Londoner either. I came to Australia nearly 50 years ago as a 20-year-old.

In spite of using Aussie words and phrases and having lived here nearly 50 years, every new person I meet tells me I still sound English. Yet whenever I visit my mother, who is still in England, she complains about my "awful Australian accent"! She's been complaining about it since my first visit back in 1973!


Back on topic - if you want to find out if someone is an Aussie or a Kiwi, ask them to say the word "sex". Kiwis don't have sex, they have six.
Where I was teaching we had a Kiwi in charge of sport. So on Monday mornings she would get up and announce the Year Six results. And they would all giggle every week as it certainly sounded like Year Sex. They must reverse the pronunciations!
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Old 10-23-2018, 05:00 AM
 
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Asking people to say sex, I expect could land one up in a bit of bother. Just goes to show though, the difference is hardly great. The same few examples tend to be used as examples with consistency.
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Old 10-28-2018, 04:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by xboxmas View Post
I have heard from people from both countries that their accents are different, but as an American who isn’t used to it, it’s hard to tell. Is it a subtle difference like how American vs Canadian accents are?
think of it this way

kiwis pronounce the letter I as U so the word this sounds like thus

kiwis pronounce the letter E as I so the word ten sounds like tin



aussies dont do that


other than that , quite similar but not as similar as american and canadian accents .
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Old 10-28-2018, 04:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
I have noticed that the Kiwi accent is tronger in the South Island. I had trouble understanding some people who shared a tour with us and they were from a rural town in the south.

The classic difference is illustrated by the Kiwis saying fush and chips, not fish and chips.

But, yes, I tend to confuse American and Canadian accents, especially when the Americans are from somewhere like Maine.

You know it is quite remarkable that the accents from Perth to Auckland are remarkably similar as that is an enormous distance. I am not sure how that came to be.
my impression having lived and worked there was that the kiwi accent is stronger in the north island as that is where most maoris live , maoris have their own accent and its very strong .
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