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Old 12-14-2018, 11:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v View Post
I think we are getting off-track here.....the US has a huge legal immigration intake as well, middle class educated (and mostly company sponsored, we do not have a point based system) people from Asia, India,, Europe and even Latin America not to mention the investor class.

My question was what Australians think of the current immigration debate in the us and the fact that our immigration system appear to be more lax or "soft" compared to Australia with a lot of loopholes and the opportunities to fly under the radar...it was not a debate about the different geographic position of the two countries and/or the socio-economic status of their neighbors.


By the way, I remember vividly many "students" from the Phillippines, China and other Asian countries trying all they could to stay legally in Australia and I met quite few illegals working in the service industry (food, construction, etc...) and doing farm work.
Australians think very little, if at all about American immigration debate. As mentioned there is debate enough here, regarding explosive population growth in main urban settings, that to be concerned with a foreign nation.


You may well recall students attempting to gain legal status. Australia's higher education is very dependant on foreigners paying high fees. The carrot is staying on after, or at least a good prospect, otherwise foreign students would go elsewhere.
It is geographic in the sense that America is more open due to borders than Australia. You asked about poor Asians, you got the answer.
Obviously, the young, be they students or back packers seeling PR will not be of the same means as someone a decade or more older. Some employers have been in the past taking advantage of the old 457 visa to import semi skilled workers, without market testing. Possibly less so of late.


Possibly more comment on Germany's migration policy of a few years ago than America's present one , at least in my circles.
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Old 12-15-2018, 01:35 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
Australians think very little, if at all about American immigration debate. As mentioned there is debate enough here, regarding explosive population growth in main urban settings, that to be concerned with a foreign nation
Agreed totally, i don't recall the USA as ever been considerd to have lax immigration laws?. Particularly over the last couple of decades when the actual net migrarion per 1000 people has been quite a bit higher in Australia than the US.
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Old 12-15-2018, 02:14 AM
 
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Australia has a per cent of population has 28% born in other countries. Way, way higher than USA,UK, France, Canada and main migrant nations.
USA has reduced rather dramatically their refugee intake under Trump's watch. Probably few Australians would know or care though. I know a woman, born in Iran, whose main part of family live in States. She had one hell of a job getting a visa earlier in the year, even though American side of family is well established over there. Son being a surgeon in a well known hospital and citizen. She has an Australian pass port, but the born in Iran bit created problems.
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Old 12-15-2018, 03:29 AM
 
Location: Sydney
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I haven't given it any thought at all, didn't even know there was an issue.
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Old 12-15-2018, 10:47 AM
 
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[quote=danielsa1775;53890329]Agreed totally, i don't recall the USA as ever been considerd to have lax immigration laws?. /QUOTE]

On paper is no lax....in practice it's a different story.
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Old 12-15-2018, 06:49 PM
 
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In practice I expect USA farmers and small business requires, (or claims to) low cost workers to do the harvesting, child minding and low status jobs that Americans tend to shun, probably due to the low wages and lack of job security.


It is a little different in Australia, but not so different as you may expect. There is talk about upping semi skilled numbers in hospitality and rural work here.


I'm not sure what point the OP is attempting to get over. Probably that America's immigration is so lax. Actually facts don't really suggest that as true in recent times.


Both countries are reducing intake. Both countries have an element of racism or intolerance involved. Australia's case was turbo immigration was impacting negatively on Australia's two principle cities . I have heard issues around this matter are worse in America.
But as mentioned America's immigration policy does not loom large (or small) among most Australians. The main issue would be the 'red tape' involved in Australians entering American borders.
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Old 12-15-2018, 10:13 PM
 
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Based on my own anecdote I'm sure most Australians are inclined to agree with Trump policies when it comes to immigration. After living in Sydney for a while it was clear that many Australians hold xenophobic values.
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Old 12-16-2018, 12:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobishere View Post
Based on my own anecdote I'm sure most Australians are inclined to agree with Trump policies when it comes to immigration. After living in Sydney for a while it was clear that many Australians hold xenophobic values.
Well probably not most. Not among the more educated anyway. I don't know anyone in person that thinks Trump is doing well. But online a segment appear to think otherwise.
Australia has just be shown to not be in agreement with the right wing of the equivalent Republicans.
I've met Australians who found the racism in the States far worse than here.
Xenophobic views are not majority. But, no denying a significant per cent possibly 20% probably hold such views, which is why turbo immigration into two cities, is simply looking for trouble.
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Old 12-16-2018, 06:12 PM
 
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Isn't Australia (as a whole) more liberal than the US (as a whole), though?

Although of course a solidly liberal state like California is likely to be as liberal as Australia.

I heard Queensland is the most conservative state in Australia; do they have stricter immigration laws? How do their politics differ, and what US state would they politically resemble the most?
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Old 12-16-2018, 07:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Isn't Australia (as a whole) more liberal than the US (as a whole), though?

Although of course a solidly liberal state like California is likely to be as liberal as Australia.

I heard Queensland is the most conservative state in Australia; do they have stricter immigration laws? How do their politics differ, and what US state would they politically resemble the most?
Possibly so if compared to the States. Compulsory voting detracts from extremes, I imagine. Australians tend to be conservative in political thinking (middle at least) but not overly political animals. The topic of politics, is not discussed to any extent, especially if compared to Europe.


You are quite correct. Queensland is generally known as the 'most conservative' state. They have a long period of rather extreme conservatism rule behind them, but have 'likely mellowed' over time with multiculturalism (especially Brisbane and Cairns)and tourism featuring ever bigger, but still rural 'conservative' strongholds, would sort of equate to the 'Deep South' in the States.


I would say Victoria, especially Melbourne, has the most progressive politics equating CA.
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