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Old 01-09-2019, 12:28 AM
 
225 posts, read 71,566 times
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Western Australia is no longer the state with the best economy, it is NSW. You can go to Sydney as there are really nice beaches and the beaches are the best I have seen for a city. Sydney is very expensive however the average pay is the highest in the nation.

I agree and it can not be that easy making friends, and this is more so in the cities than the smaller regional areas. I also found when I was in New Zealand the people were a bit more friendly in general than in Australia.
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Old 01-09-2019, 02:47 AM
 
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Correct above, but then a place should transcend purely economy. WA has since I recall been a casino, over reliant on the resource industry, but sadly became very expensive over the recent decade and a half ,with fierce resistance to return to price sanity post boom.


Sydney, unless young and house sharing, is probably beyond most young families these days, even those once considered to be on a good pay scale. Rest hardly matters.


Making 'friends' is something of a tall order, regardless of place. Do you really find the regional areas more friendly. It wasn't my experience generally with folk from other places, listening to their comments. Depends on position, of course.


I have heard similar comments voiced in regards to New Zealand. Even from New Zealanders based in London.
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Old 01-09-2019, 03:12 AM
 
225 posts, read 71,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
Correct above, but then a place should transcend purely economy. WA has since I recall been a casino, over reliant on the resource industry, but sadly became very expensive over the recent decade and a half ,with fierce resistance to return to price sanity post boom.


Sydney, unless young and house sharing, is probably beyond most young families these days, even those once considered to be on a good pay scale. Rest hardly matters.


Making 'friends' is something of a tall order, regardless of place. Do you really find the regional areas more friendly. It wasn't my experience generally with folk from other places, listening to their comments. Depends on position, of course.


I have heard similar comments voiced in regards to New Zealand. Even from New Zealanders based in London.
With regional areas, it depends on the area. Some areas are not so friendly and others a bit more friendlier.

I agree with the OP with Americans tend to be more friendlier and not been to America but my experiences with encountering Americans.
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Old 01-09-2019, 05:18 PM
 
2,265 posts, read 3,073,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herenow1 View Post
With regional areas, it depends on the area. Some areas are not so friendly and others a bit more friendlier.

I agree with the OP with Americans tend to be more friendlier and not been to America but my experiences with encountering Americans.
AS for Americans, they are far easier to engage. Where on the other hand, I don't think (outside of some Nordics, perhaps) a harder people en mass to engage than Australians and New Zealanders.
Even among themselves so little in the way of conversation seems to be exchanged.
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Old 01-10-2019, 09:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aaa555www View Post
I would consider Adelaide if you're looking for that smaller city vibe, still want niche beaches and a nice climate and less wind.

The way I see it Adelaide is half way between Melbourne and Perth geographically (sort of), but more importantly - culturally. It's not as busy as Melbourne, still feels kind of rural if you're further away from the city, but the city itself is very trendy and has the cafes and things that Melbourne does.



HTH
I am interested in Adelaide. It seems to have an interesting climate, good beaches, better location and more culture and history than Perth. But, is it as expensive? Does it have good job opportunities? Same problem with urban sprawl?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
Well, in most of the surveys of different types which rank quality of life, Sweden is very close to the top. It is obviously a wealthy country, with a central location in. Europe, and a very good welfare system. Some of the things that I believe are far superior in Sweden to Australia would not concern you at the moment but would if you were to ever have a family. I believe that the maternity and paternity leave and payments are much better and are paid for longer, and the preschool and childcare is more subsidised. Correct me if I am wrong. But my daughters u pay about $150 a day for childcare in Sydney though there are variable subsidies. In Australia, dental care and optical care physiotherapy and so on are not generally provided by Medicare and not fully covered by private health insurance.

I have never lived in Perth but it is the wind as bad in the mornings? Most exposed places are windy in the afternoons but it is certainly a different coast to eg that of the Med.

Yes, Sweden does rank pretty high in most ranking. But, not as high as Australian, Canadian or Austrian cities for example. Yes, Sweden does have free healthcare and a very good parental leave benefit. But Sweden does also have enormous problems with segregation, healthcare and school on its knees, housing and social exclusion. And, among the highest taxes in the world compared to high cost of living and very average salaries. So, no paradise. Also, Sweden is very homogenous in its culture and people (outside the ghettos). No, you are right, the wind is not as bad in the mornings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
Few disagreements there from a Perth inhabitant. An issue for me with regards to Perth, is the over conformist and overly conservative nature of too much of the population here.
Perth, may be ideal for 'tots' (babies and young children) but gets a bit samey for older kids and little really for 'adults' outside of family and possibly 'few close friends' or perhaps 'mates' more than friends.


I am certainly far from convinced that this is a Perth thing, but perhaps more 'options' exist in larger cities like Melbourne and Sydney, but wouldn't say at all in similar sized cities such as Adelaide.


The making of 'friends' is a long time discussion point. But as a former resident of a near neighbour, Denmark, it is far from being easy there either. Sweden, even worse according to Danish thinking. But as a whole, Europe I would agree is much easier to make contact, people converse more and about a far wider range of issues. So communication, tends to be at a rather 'low level' here, in comparison.
Nothing 'laid back' past the generally observed first appearances, far too 'reserved' to be such.


The wind has long been a factor on Perth beaches. You really need to get to the beach early in the day. I mean, after 11 am it can be too late.


The flies are annoying more one goes inland. Picnicking can be 'challenging' but don't detect too many in the city or areas I tend to go. Up bush, of course, a completely other story.


Perth is very much an early to bed, rise early type place, a bit countryside in that aspect.


Not a city for every taste, that's for sure. Built on sand, rather shaky foundations some might say, built to much on reliance of resource industry and booms and busts. A casino type economy.
Yes overpriced. Too expensive to sustain a proper tourist industry, it could be argued. I think we are the only state with declining tourist numbers.


Nice city in ways, but yet to find its place and develop more substance over the shallow prevailing attitudes of too many of the burghers here.

I agree with everything you say. Of course, Denmark and Sweden may be the very WORST countries in the world to make friends as a foreigner. Very closed people, despite what they believe about themselves. But, that is exactly why I came here. The laid-back culture and the open minded and friendly people. But, so far, not very much of that experience. The only thing Iíve really noticed that Australians are truly laid-back about, is how they perceive drinking and driving. Very liberal attitude towards that. No wonder there is so many fatal accidents.

Quote:
Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
I suspect localities like Byron Bay may suit more some of the OP's stated requirements. More transient population from around the world. Folk less connected to area more chance of being less reserved hence more open their surroundings and people in general.
I found Darwin somewhat like that as well. Cairns to a lesser extent perhaps but quite acceptable. Can't really think of many other places in Australia with a similar vibe.
Darwin and Cairns are surely too humid and too isolated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shirleyeve View Post
If milder climates are your thing, then Wollongong, Gold Coast, Newcastle, Byron Bay, Toowoomba (maybe?)...mostly mild climates without the extremes of hot or cold like other Australian cities (though what is cold in Australia is more akin to "cool" or "chilly" for a European or North American). Our cities just do not get the plummeting record lows of North American cities in winter...
It may not get as cold here as in Europe but because the houses here are not properly isolated it feels equally cold.

Quote:
Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
AS for Americans, they are far easier to engage. Where on the other hand, I don't think (outside of some Nordics, perhaps) a harder people en mass to engage than Australians and New Zealanders.
Even among themselves so little in the way of conversation seems to be exchanged.
How come you say that about Aussies and Kiwis? If it is so, why does these countries have a global reputation of being friendly and laid-back?
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Old 01-11-2019, 02:04 AM
 
2,265 posts, read 3,073,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradpaisley94 View Post
I am interested in Adelaide. It seems to have an interesting climate, good beaches, better location and more culture and history than Perth. But, is it as expensive? Does it have good job opportunities? Same problem with urban sprawl?




Yes, Sweden does rank pretty high in most ranking. But, not as high as Australian, Canadian or Austrian cities for example. Yes, Sweden does have free healthcare and a very good parental leave benefit. But Sweden does also have enormous problems with segregation, healthcare and school on its knees, housing and social exclusion. And, among the highest taxes in the world compared to high cost of living and very average salaries. So, no paradise. Also, Sweden is very homogenous in its culture and people (outside the ghettos). No, you are right, the wind is not as bad in the mornings.




I agree with everything you say. Of course, Denmark and Sweden may be the very WORST countries in the world to make friends as a foreigner. Very closed people, despite what they believe about themselves. But, that is exactly why I came here. The laid-back culture and the open minded and friendly people. But, so far, not very much of that experience. The only thing Iíve really noticed that Australians are truly laid-back about, is how they perceive drinking and driving. Very liberal attitude towards that. No wonder there is so many fatal accidents.



Darwin and Cairns are surely too humid and too isolated.



It may not get as cold here as in Europe but because the houses here are not properly isolated it feels equally cold.



How come you say that about Aussies and Kiwis? If it is so, why does these countries have a global reputation of being friendly and laid-back?
A global reputation among exactly who? Londoners tended to find them somewhat direct to the point of many being vulgar. Didn't really note too much about them being laid back in my years there. over on what the Brit's call The Continent', most have next to no impression of them. Unless of course having travelled Australia, been to Bali, encountered drunken loud mouths at the Munich Beer Festival or increasingly in Croatia (their view may or may not be tainted ,perhaps not of the 'laid back version though)


Darwin and Cairns due to a large international contingent. (travellers and tourists)What's humidity got to do with anything?


Not particular liberal, at least to be of note. Just hard to get to know with relationships rather shallow and terminated with ease. Probably one would come to Australia for other reasons than the 'friendly people' (sic) Nature. Climate. Out door activities. Beaches. Possibly Pay, (employment) in certain activities. Travel the country. All else probably better found elsewhere.
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Old 01-11-2019, 10:58 PM
 
306 posts, read 347,521 times
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I think Adelaide is a nicer city overall.

Better architecture, beautiful beaches, stunning villages in the hills, great dining culture...

Perth is like that isolated behemoth: lots of freeways/highways, very modern, car dependent, flat & less geographic diversity (Adelaide has the coast, the hills, Mount Lofty, the plains).
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Old 01-12-2019, 12:10 AM
 
952 posts, read 587,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradpaisley94 View Post

How come you say that about Aussies and Kiwis? If it is so, why does these countries have a global reputation of being friendly and laid-back?
Overall I find Americans to be a bit more 'formal' in their sense of etiquette, so at times they may maintain a 'pleasant' conversation beyond the point at which Aussies may cut off discussion if they think someone is arrogant, rude, condescending, or self absorbed.
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Old 01-12-2019, 01:20 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
502 posts, read 265,225 times
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Originally Posted by herenow1 View Post
Sydney is very expensive however the average pay is the highest in the nation.
This statement is true, but doesn't tell the full story. While Sydney does have higher salaries on average, the excess is insufficient to make up for the COL, on average.

I employ people in every mainland capital city in a high wage industry and know many others that do also in other sectors. I know that if deciding on purely income to cost of living measure you are better off any where other than Sydney, on average. But my Sydney friends tell me there is much more to it than that. I remain unconvinced and enjoy welcoming them north when they finally figure it out.
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Old 01-12-2019, 01:21 AM
 
2,265 posts, read 3,073,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shirleyeve View Post
I think Adelaide is a nicer city overall.

Better architecture, beautiful beaches, stunning villages in the hills, great dining culture...

Perth is like that isolated behemoth: lots of freeways/highways, very modern, car dependent, flat & less geographic diversity (Adelaide has the coast, the hills, Mount Lofty, the plains).
I think I'd agree with that. I have never been sure as to just why Adelaide gets a bad rap from Perthites as being somewhat dull.
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