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Old 01-17-2019, 10:46 PM
 
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I'm not personally a fan of Perth, I'll take Melbourne over it any day. Sunny beach towns get old fast.
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Old 01-18-2019, 12:34 AM
 
954 posts, read 589,033 times
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Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post

High overseas birth rates are very true, but Australian cities do not appear, to my thinking anyway, as diverse as London, New York, Toronto or Amsterdam to name a few.

.
Are you talking about diversity or social division? Just by looking you won't be able tell if someone is from Chile or Poland, or Burma rather than India or Bangladesh.
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Old 01-18-2019, 02:25 AM
 
Location: Australia
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Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Are you talking about diversity or social division? Just by looking you won't be able tell if someone is from Chile or Poland, or Burma rather than India or Bangladesh.
I agree, my mother had a wonderful carer in her nursing home and I assumed, for some reason that he was Nepalese. Having a chat one day discovered he was Peruvian, married to an Aussie!
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Old 01-18-2019, 05:29 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Are you talking about diversity or social division? Just by looking you won't be able tell if someone is from Chile or Poland, or Burma rather than India or Bangladesh.
No talking races. Not as diverse as those countries mentioned. As for nationalities, that too but perhaps less so. Obviously just by looking and not hearing language or accent one would not know. Thing being ne comes across more of the less common nationalities in those cities as well.


Australian cities are getting more diverse though. Great to hear more Spanish being spoken in recent times.
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Old 01-18-2019, 06:05 AM
 
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Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
No talking races. Not as diverse as those countries mentioned. As for nationalities, that too but perhaps less so. Obviously just by looking and not hearing language or accent one would not know. Thing being ne comes across more of the less common nationalities in those cities as well.


Australian cities are getting more diverse though. Great to hear more Spanish being spoken in recent times.
Statistics are a better guide than perceptions.

Leaving London aside, the thing I noticed most about the UK cities I’ve visited was the comparative lack of diversity.
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Old 01-18-2019, 10:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Statistics are a better guide than perceptions.

Leaving London aside, the thing I noticed most about the UK cities Iíve visited was the comparative lack of diversity.
Well London was one of the cities I mentioned. Not the UK in general. Although some areas like Peterborough do boast about how many languages are spoken in their schools.


I'm a big one for stats. But which ever way you look at it, Australia is lacking in a Caribbean population and a fairly small one, compared to cities mentioned. Hardly a perception, simply fact.
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Old 01-28-2019, 04:34 AM
 
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I have the last few days started to examine my (our) prospects of obtaining a permanent visa to stay in Australia. The more we’ve been here, the more we like it. But it is not very easy to get. It seems like we could only qualify for the 189 and 190 visas, and we have so many questions about that. Furthermore, there is no real place to go where you can ask these questions, you can just call. And there is only so much information the migration-people can give you through the phone.

So, does anybody here perhaps have any advice for us? Maybe been through it all themselves?
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Old 01-29-2019, 04:26 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Bradpaisley94 View Post
I have the last few days started to examine my (our) prospects of obtaining a permanent visa to stay in Australia. The more weíve been here, the more we like it. But it is not very easy to get. It seems like we could only qualify for the 189 and 190 visas, and we have so many questions about that. Furthermore, there is no real place to go where you can ask these questions, you can just call. And there is only so much information the migration-people can give you through the phone.

So, does anybody here perhaps have any advice for us? Maybe been through it all themselves?
Migration to Australia is a business and rather profitable one at that for those concerned. The general answer to your question would be to consult the list of occupations listed and ascertain if yours is one deemed needed.


Most migration agents should offer one free consultation. The process from there will cost but usually the way folk go in an attempt to qualify.


Migration reg's change with frequency in this country so need to be up to date. A temp entry work visa could be another way to at least gain entry and see where being on shore takes you.
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Old 02-08-2019, 08:15 PM
 
107 posts, read 61,623 times
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Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
Migration to Australia is a business and rather profitable one at that for those concerned. The general answer to your question would be to consult the list of occupations listed and ascertain if yours is one deemed needed.


Most migration agents should offer one free consultation. The process from there will cost but usually the way folk go in an attempt to qualify.


Migration reg's change with frequency in this country so need to be up to date. A temp entry work visa could be another way to at least gain entry and see where being on shore takes you.
Very difficult to immigrate to Australia. Even though I have double Science Bachelorís, I lack in work experience. To apply as Urban Planner, I need to pass several assessments, and even if I do so, I might still not have enough points. If I apply as Environmental consultant, I need a state nomination, several years of working experience, to pass an assessment and a current job offer of at least 12 months. Oh yes, and I cannot be over 30 years of age. I mean, I am not, but to achieve all of this and still not be over 30 is almost impossible if that is not the sole goal in oneís life and you work just to achieve it from High School and on.

Ridiculous. I will probably have to look further, perhaps towards other countries. Which is a shame I have to say, considering we are two healthy, young, Science graduates, that just want a normal life.
But Australia donít want us. The weirdest thing however, is the fact that not even the Australian government, that Iíve been in touch with a lot lately, can (or want to, not sure) answer any questions. Itís like itís too complicated even for them.
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Old 02-09-2019, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Australia
577 posts, read 202,895 times
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The fact is, without being rude, you are two of many thousands of young educated people who would like to immigrate permanently to Australia. At the moment there is a strong sentiment to lower the numbers immigrating, mostly because of the pressure on the infrastructure in the three big eastern cities.

The is an awareness that some people have been trying to use to working holiday and student visas as a pathway to stay permanently and these are not their primary intention. That is why you would be getting no preference in assessing your eligibility to stay here. Science is regarded as fairly much a generalist degree here and the requirements to register physios are probably in line with the requirements to register many other professionals. I lived next door to two foreign trained doctors and although she passed the exams and had a thriving practice, he never did.

Think of it like this. The majority of Australians attend university in Australia where the costs are subsidised by the government. In return these young people generally work here, pay taxes and repay their HECS. If we import more young graduates than we need then these local graduates will be more likely to be unemployed and be a drain on the country rather than contributing to it.
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