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Old 12-21-2018, 10:05 PM
 
94 posts, read 55,879 times
Reputation: 52

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Before coming to Australia, from Sweden, I read everything I could find about what it is like to live here. I really tried to imagine what life here would be like and could barely wait for my moment to make it happen. I choose Perth as my destination because of its status as the Australian capital with the most sunshine, best beaches and strongest economy. Now after having spent quite some time (2014 & 2015, and now again since October) here I have mixed feelings about my experience.
Many things were exactly as good as I hoped that the would be. The city is very clean, low on crime, very accessible beautiful beaches, lots of sunshine, very good salaries, low taxes, cheap wine and much more. I also discovered that there are quite good bicycle paths, a decent public transport system, a variety of non-dairy food (Iím allergic) and a good cultural scene.

But then I also discovered such that cannot be known unless you really go out there and live in Australia (Perth) for a while. First of all, yes, the weather is often sunny and stable, but nobody told me anything about the wind? It is windy ALL THE TIME! It is difficult to even be on the beach for 10 minutes without getting all sandy because the wind is blowing all the time. It also makes it feel much less warm than it actually is. A 29 C day often feel like a 19 C day because is it so windy. Then there are the houses. No isolation, really? I get that it gets hot, but it also gets chilly in the night and then you are freezing your ass off! And oh, it gets dark like 7 PM. Not that much time to go to the beach after work if it gets dark an hour after you finished for the day.

Next up is the flies. I know, everybody is constantly taking about all the deadly creatures, so I should not be surprised. But I have not seen any of those. But the flies are EVERYWHERE. ALL. THE. TIME! You simply cannot do anything about them. I really can ruin oneís day. Furthermore, sure the salaries are very good, but it is also super expensive. And it is really difficult to do anything because everything is so far away. Which takes me to urban sprawl and sub-urbanism. I know many (most?) cities have it but in Perth it is really a massive thing. And it sorts of ruins the cityís character and makes it way less accessible. My final comments are on Aussies. Sure, many are laid back but they are not even close to as social, talkable or communicative as I thought (as are for example the Americans Iíve met). Many will be helpful if asked anything but is really difficult to really befriend many of them for real.

So my question is: are these features (problems) Iíve listed something that is present all over Australia or is it something unique to Perth? Should I be looking somewhere else (East Coast)?
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Old 12-22-2018, 12:45 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,386 posts, read 5,272,342 times
Reputation: 2707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradpaisley94 View Post
Before coming to Australia, from Sweden, I read everything I could find about what it is like to live here. I really tried to imagine what life here would be like and could barely wait for my moment to make it happen. I choose Perth as my destination because of its status as the Australian capital with the most sunshine, best beaches and strongest economy. Now after having spent quite some time (2014 & 2015, and now again since October) here I have mixed feelings about my experience.
Many things were exactly as good as I hoped that the would be. The city is very clean, low on crime, very accessible beautiful beaches, lots of sunshine, very good salaries, low taxes, cheap wine and much more. I also discovered that there are quite good bicycle paths, a decent public transport system, a variety of non-dairy food (I’m allergic) and a good cultural scene.

But then I also discovered such that cannot be known unless you really go out there and live in Australia (Perth) for a while. First of all, yes, the weather is often sunny and stable, but nobody told me anything about the wind? It is windy ALL THE TIME! It is difficult to even be on the beach for 10 minutes without getting all sandy because the wind is blowing all the time. It also makes it feel much less warm than it actually is. A 29 C day often feel like a 19 C day because is it so windy. Then there are the houses. No isolation, really? I get that it gets hot, but it also gets chilly in the night and then you are freezing your ass off! And oh, it gets dark like 7 PM. Not that much time to go to the beach after work if it gets dark an hour after you finished for the day.

Next up is the flies. I know, everybody is constantly taking about all the deadly creatures, so I should not be surprised. But I have not seen any of those. But the flies are EVERYWHERE. ALL. THE. TIME! You simply cannot do anything about them. I really can ruin one’s day. Furthermore, sure the salaries are very good, but it is also super expensive. And it is really difficult to do anything because everything is so far away. Which takes me to urban sprawl and sub-urbanism. I know many (most?) cities have it but in Perth it is really a massive thing. And it sorts of ruins the city’s character and makes it way less accessible. My final comments are on Aussies. Sure, many are laid back but they are not even close to as social, talkable or communicative as I thought (as are for example the Americans I’ve met). Many will be helpful if asked anything but is really difficult to really befriend many of them for real.

So my question is: are these features (problems) I’ve listed something that is present all over Australia or is it something unique to Perth? Should I be looking somewhere else (East Coast)?
Sounds a bit like Brisbane, except for the flies, (I see surprisingly few of them), and of course no beaches on the cities doorstep, there are low lying mountains far closer, personally i much prefer mountains and rain forests over the beach. The breeze is usually just cool and refreshing. Its also fair to say its generally would be warmer and more humid in Brisbane, the other side been you also get loads more rain.

I would agree entirely with your comment on Australian people (I am one) , and I think that is a very national problem.

Even Brisbane is a good deal more built up in the core than Perth, which is saying something.
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Old 12-22-2018, 02:40 AM
 
Location: Australia
499 posts, read 173,325 times
Reputation: 959
Have you decided against Canada?

It is a bit difficult if you are from Sweden, which is generally regarded as one of the most desirable places on the planet to live. Sounds like you prefer warmer weather, but no location is likely to be perfect for any of us all the time.

Sydney has the advantage of longer days in summer, having daylight saving. Also we have beaches galore. The flies are generally not too bad. I remember persistent flies like you describe years ago but not for the past few years. However we live with spiders, cockroaches and so on. Also, the beach suburbs are expensive and the traffic can be dismal. On the other hand the public transport is quite good. You might like living in the Eastern suburbs. Places like Randwick and Kingsford, Coogee and Clovelly are close to the city and beaches, have very good public transport and quite an interesting mixture of people.

Lack of insulation in homes is a typical Aussie problem and I believe even worse in NZ.

As far as making close friends, I think the issue is not confined to Australia, but certainly many of us keep friends from school our whole life. My nephew who is nearly your age sees school friends and people he plays sport with.
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Old 12-23-2018, 08:15 PM
 
94 posts, read 55,879 times
Reputation: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
Sounds a bit like Brisbane, except for the flies, (I see surprisingly few of them), and of course no beaches on the cities doorstep, there are low lying mountains far closer, personally i much prefer mountains and rain forests over the beach. The breeze is usually just cool and refreshing. Its also fair to say its generally would be warmer and more humid in Brisbane, the other side been you also get loads more rain.

I would agree entirely with your comment on Australian people (I am one) , and I think that is a very national problem.

Even Brisbane is a good deal more built up in the core than Perth, which is saying something.
Would you say that Brisbane is cheaper? Easier to get around? Less isolated?
In regard to Aussies, it is a bit weird how the stereotype is the super talkative person but from my experience Aussies are not much more outgoing than Brits or Swedes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
Have you decided against Canada?

It is a bit difficult if you are from Sweden, which is generally regarded as one of the most desirable places on the planet to live. Sounds like you prefer warmer weather, but no location is likely to be perfect for any of us all the time.

Sydney has the advantage of longer days in summer, having daylight saving. Also we have beaches galore. The flies are generally not too bad. I remember persistent flies like you describe years ago but not for the past few years. However we live with spiders, cockroaches and so on. Also, the beach suburbs are expensive and the traffic can be dismal. On the other hand the public transport is quite good. You might like living in the Eastern suburbs. Places like Randwick and Kingsford, Coogee and Clovelly are close to the city and beaches, have very good public transport and quite an interesting mixture of people.

Lack of insulation in homes is a typical Aussie problem and I believe even worse in NZ.

As far as making close friends, I think the issue is not confined to Australia, but certainly many of us keep friends from school our whole life. My nephew who is nearly your age sees school friends and people he plays sport with.
No, I have not decided against Canada. Iím probably going there next year to live for a couple of months and see how it suits me. But in the meantime, Iím doing research on different parts of the world. Why would Sweden be such a good place to live? What is so desirable about Sweden?

Iím thinking about maybe going east coast and try Melbourne or Sydney. Before I came to Oz most people told me to go east but I thought that the weather was the number one factor, so I choose Perth. But itís difficult to know which one to choose. Melbourne has more ďEuropean feelĒ, more culture and is less expensive as for Sydney having better beaches and better beaches but is more expensive. What about smaller places like Geelong or Townsville? More of a community feel?
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Old 12-23-2018, 08:40 PM
Status: "Feeling welcome :D" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Andorra
38 posts, read 5,384 times
Reputation: 55
I would consider Adelaide if you're looking for that smaller city vibe, still want niche beaches and a nice climate and less wind.

The way I see it Adelaide is half way between Melbourne and Perth geographically (sort of), but more importantly - culturally. It's not as busy as Melbourne, still feels kind of rural if you're further away from the city, but the city itself is very trendy and has the cafes and things that Melbourne does.

HTH
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Old 12-23-2018, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Australia
499 posts, read 173,325 times
Reputation: 959
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradpaisley94 View Post
Would you say that Brisbane is cheaper? Easier to get around? Less isolated?
In regard to Aussies, it is a bit weird how the stereotype is the super talkative person but from my experience Aussies are not much more outgoing than Brits or Swedes.




No, I have not decided against Canada. Iím probably going there next year to live for a couple of months and see how it suits me. But in the meantime, Iím doing research on different parts of the world. Why would Sweden be such a good place to live? What is so desirable about Sweden?

Iím thinking about maybe going east coast and try Melbourne or Sydney. Before I came to Oz most people told me to go east but I thought that the weather was the number one factor, so I choose Perth. But itís difficult to know which one to choose. Melbourne has more ďEuropean feelĒ, more culture and is less expensive as for Sydney having better beaches and better beaches but is more expensive. What about smaller places like Geelong or Townsville? More of a community feel?
Well, in most of the surveys of different types which rank quality of life, Sweden is very close to the top. It is obviously a wealthy country, with a central location in. Europe, and a very good welfare system. Some of the things that I believe are far superior in Sweden to Australia would not concern you at the moment but would if you were to ever have a family. I believe that the maternity and paternity leave and payments are much better and are paid for longer, and the preschool and childcare is more subsidised. Correct me if I am wrong. But my daughters u pay about $150 a day for childcare in Sydney though there are variable subsidies. In Australia, dental care and optical care physiotherapy and so on are not generally provided by Medicare and not fully covered by private health insurance.

I have never lived in Perth but it is the wind as bad in the mornings? Most exposed places are windy in the afternoons but it is certainly a different coast to eg that of the Med.
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Old 12-23-2018, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,386 posts, read 5,272,342 times
Reputation: 2707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradpaisley94 View Post
Would you say that Brisbane is cheaper? Easier to get around? Less isolated?
In regard to Aussies, it is a bit weird how the stereotype is the super talkative person but from my experience Aussies are not much more outgoing than Brits or Swedes.
I have not actually been to Perth, all Australian cities are expensive, you wont get much variation in prices regardless of where you are.

Real estate in Brisbane is a more expensive than Perth theses days, not sure if that flows through to rent or not.

I would imagine Brisbane is a lot like Perth in that once you get outside the built up inner ring, you will almost certainly need a car. Though statistically at least Brisbane's inner ring areas are a lot more built up than Perth's, and extend further out, so you get more options.

Catching the train to the gold coast quite easy now the gold coast light rail and Brisbane heavy rail networks have been joined, however the train system in generally not good, we mostly use buses.

This is the ABS data on how each major city got to work on census day (August 2016).

More than two in three drive to work, Census reveals

Obviously all Australian cities are car dependent, thought that would indicate Perth is a bit more so than the others.

Of course just about anywhere on the east coast is going to be less isolated than Perth, unless you want to fly to south east Asia.

As far as Australians are concerned, i believe it really depends on the setting . In Europe or Asia, most Aussies are just there for a good time, true a lot of them do work, however its really just a short term thing to fund more adventures. Having lived and worked in Europe and Asia myself for a couple of years, i generally found the Australians to be far more friendly than they are at home, and found the swedes on holiday down in the Mediterranean to be particularly friendly.

Obviously at home, where you have an existing circle of friends, and there is far more potential for long term work and family commitments, mortgage stress etc, its a lot different.
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Old 12-24-2018, 02:16 AM
 
Location: NSW
2,599 posts, read 1,750,771 times
Reputation: 889
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradpaisley94 View Post
Before coming to Australia, from Sweden, I read everything I could find about what it is like to live here. I really tried to imagine what life here would be like and could barely wait for my moment to make it happen. I choose Perth as my destination because of its status as the Australian capital with the most sunshine, best beaches and strongest economy. Now after having spent quite some time (2014 & 2015, and now again since October) here I have mixed feelings about my experience.
Many things were exactly as good as I hoped that the would be. The city is very clean, low on crime, very accessible beautiful beaches, lots of sunshine, very good salaries, low taxes, cheap wine and much more. I also discovered that there are quite good bicycle paths, a decent public transport system, a variety of non-dairy food (Iím allergic) and a good cultural scene.

But then I also discovered such that cannot be known unless you really go out there and live in Australia (Perth) for a while. First of all, yes, the weather is often sunny and stable, but nobody told me anything about the wind? It is windy ALL THE TIME! It is difficult to even be on the beach for 10 minutes without getting all sandy because the wind is blowing all the time. It also makes it feel much less warm than it actually is. A 29 C day often feel like a 19 C day because is it so windy. Then there are the houses. No isolation, really? I get that it gets hot, but it also gets chilly in the night and then you are freezing your ass off! And oh, it gets dark like 7 PM. Not that much time to go to the beach after work if it gets dark an hour after you finished for the day.

Next up is the flies. I know, everybody is constantly taking about all the deadly creatures, so I should not be surprised. But I have not seen any of those. But the flies are EVERYWHERE. ALL. THE. TIME! You simply cannot do anything about them. I really can ruin oneís day. Furthermore, sure the salaries are very good, but it is also super expensive. And it is really difficult to do anything because everything is so far away. Which takes me to urban sprawl and sub-urbanism. I know many (most?) cities have it but in Perth it is really a massive thing. And it sorts of ruins the cityís character and makes it way less accessible. My final comments are on Aussies. Sure, many are laid back but they are not even close to as social, talkable or communicative as I thought (as are for example the Americans Iíve met). Many will be helpful if asked anything but is really difficult to really befriend many of them for real.

So my question is: are these features (problems) Iíve listed something that is present all over Australia or is it something unique to Perth? Should I be looking somewhere else (East Coast)?
No city is perfect, but Perth is actually pretty good overall.
I get what you talking about with the wind, it is more than just a gentle sea breeze, it is a gale.
I spent a couple of years in the west, just south of Perth.
Don't remember flies being that big of a problem though.
There is no real comparable city on the east coast, except perhaps Brisbane.
No Daylight saving is a problem for the beach, better off going before work!
Befriending people is difficult in any new place, and the west is no different and often more accepting of overseas foreigners than eastern state immigrants, believe it or not. ( a bit of a chip on their shoulder about paying too much taxes to Canberra)
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Old 12-25-2018, 05:32 PM
 
2,230 posts, read 3,042,096 times
Reputation: 1320
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradpaisley94 View Post
Before coming to Australia, from Sweden, I read everything I could find about what it is like to live here. I really tried to imagine what life here would be like and could barely wait for my moment to make it happen. I choose Perth as my destination because of its status as the Australian capital with the most sunshine, best beaches and strongest economy. Now after having spent quite some time (2014 & 2015, and now again since October) here I have mixed feelings about my experience.
Many things were exactly as good as I hoped that the would be. The city is very clean, low on crime, very accessible beautiful beaches, lots of sunshine, very good salaries, low taxes, cheap wine and much more. I also discovered that there are quite good bicycle paths, a decent public transport system, a variety of non-dairy food (Iím allergic) and a good cultural scene.

But then I also discovered such that cannot be known unless you really go out there and live in Australia (Perth) for a while. First of all, yes, the weather is often sunny and stable, but nobody told me anything about the wind? It is windy ALL THE TIME! It is difficult to even be on the beach for 10 minutes without getting all sandy because the wind is blowing all the time. It also makes it feel much less warm than it actually is. A 29 C day often feel like a 19 C day because is it so windy. Then there are the houses. No isolation, really? I get that it gets hot, but it also gets chilly in the night and then you are freezing your ass off! And oh, it gets dark like 7 PM. Not that much time to go to the beach after work if it gets dark an hour after you finished for the day.

Next up is the flies. I know, everybody is constantly taking about all the deadly creatures, so I should not be surprised. But I have not seen any of those. But the flies are EVERYWHERE. ALL. THE. TIME! You simply cannot do anything about them. I really can ruin oneís day. Furthermore, sure the salaries are very good, but it is also super expensive. And it is really difficult to do anything because everything is so far away. Which takes me to urban sprawl and sub-urbanism. I know many (most?) cities have it but in Perth it is really a massive thing. And it sorts of ruins the cityís character and makes it way less accessible. My final comments are on Aussies. Sure, many are laid back but they are not even close to as social, talkable or communicative as I thought (as are for example the Americans Iíve met). Many will be helpful if asked anything but is really difficult to really befriend many of them for real.

So my question is: are these features (problems) Iíve listed something that is present all over Australia or is it something unique to Perth? Should I be looking somewhere else (East Coast)?
Few disagreements there from a Perth inhabitant. An issue for me with regards to Perth, is the over conformist and overly conservative nature of too much of the population here.
Perth, may be ideal for 'tots' (babies and young children) but gets a bit samey for older kids and little really for 'adults' outside of family and possibly 'few close friends' or perhaps 'mates' more than friends.


I am certainly far from convinced that this is a Perth thing, but perhaps more 'options' exist in larger cities like Melbourne and Sydney, but wouldn't say at all in similar sized cities such as Adelaide.


The making of 'friends' is a long time discussion point. But as a former resident of a near neighbour, Denmark, it is far from being easy there either. Sweden, even worse according to Danish thinking. But as a whole, Europe I would agree is much easier to make contact, people converse more and about a far wider range of issues. So communication, tends to be at a rather 'low level' here, in comparison.
Nothing 'laid back' past the generally observed first appearances, far too 'reserved' to be such.


The wind has long been a factor on Perth beaches. You really need to get to the beach early in the day. I mean, after 11 am it can be too late.


The flies are annoying more one goes inland. Picnicking can be 'challenging' but don't detect too many in the city or areas I tend to go. Up bush, of course, a completely other story.


Perth is very much an early to bed, rise early type place, a bit countryside in that aspect.


Not a city for every taste, that's for sure. Built on sand, rather shaky foundations some might say, built to much on reliance of resource industry and booms and busts. A casino type economy.
Yes overpriced. Too expensive to sustain a proper tourist industry, it could be argued. I think we are the only state with declining tourist numbers.


Nice city in ways, but yet to find its place and develop more substance over the shallow prevailing attitudes of too many of the burghers here.
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Old 12-25-2018, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Anglers Reach, NSW (Australia)
211 posts, read 21,496 times
Reputation: 106
Yes. Anywhere in Western NSW (inland), especially Anglers Reach, Adaminaby, Oberon, and so forth
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