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View Poll Results: New Zealand or Tasmania?
New Zealand 35 79.55%
Tasmania 9 20.45%
Voters: 44. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-02-2019, 11:31 PM
 
Location: Australia
611 posts, read 225,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BCC_1 View Post
Unemployment is high, educational attainment is low, the population is generally "poor" when compared to the rest of Australia. Tasmania ranks lowest on most socio-economic markers.
This has been true for a long time but it is now turning around quite well. I investigated a bit as my nephew has moved to work in Hobart. I had already heard that there has been a surge in real estate prices there and I was quite surprised to see that the unemployment rate is no longer the worst in the country. He is having to pay a very high rent as there is a shortage of rental accommodation, possibly caused by the tourist boom and people renting on air b&b and the like, not permanent rentals.

I think the education problem will take a long time to fix. Apparently too many parents do not encourage their kids to seek tertiary education as they fear they will lose them to the mainland. Which they usually will.
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Old 02-03-2019, 04:36 PM
 
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Tasmania has long been the 'basket case' of Australia. Indeed, I was surprised to read that WA now has the highest unemployed rate in Australia.


The reason Tasmanian real estate 'took off' was largely mainland Australian buyers, becoming aware of the quality of the real estate compared to the over inflated prices paid in Melbourne and Sydney. It sort of fed itself. Others looking for 'lifestyle changes' and moving there for retirement.
Tasmania has become a bit of a sea change for some, with its promotion of fresh food and clean air along with a few TV shows selling the island.


I doubt if much outside of some service industry and real estate has changed much in the way of employment. Health services I seem to recall were under performing other states as well as education.


How the 'jokes' on 'Tasmanian birth irregularities' shall we call it dissipated, I wonder? Very unfair in all likelihood but some did class it as Bogan central in some locations.
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Old 02-03-2019, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Australia
611 posts, read 225,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
Tasmania has long been the 'basket case' of Australia. Indeed, I was surprised to read that WA now has the highest unemployed rate in Australia.


The reason Tasmanian real estate 'took off' was largely mainland Australian buyers, becoming aware of the quality of the real estate compared to the over inflated prices paid in Melbourne and Sydney. It sort of fed itself. Others looking for 'lifestyle changes' and moving there for retirement.
Tasmania has become a bit of a sea change for some, with its promotion of fresh food and clean air along with a few TV shows selling the island.


I doubt if much outside of some service industry and real estate has changed much in the way of employment. Health services I seem to recall were under performing other states as well as education.


How the 'jokes' on 'Tasmanian birth irregularities' shall we call it dissipated, I wonder? Very unfair in all likelihood but some did class it as Bogan central in some locations.
I was surprised to hear from my nephew that they will be importing labour from the mainland in specialist engineering roles as they cannot be filled locally. But perhaps not so surprising when the roles are very specialist.

Amongst people we know of retirement age there is a cultural change from the previous generation. People do not crave to move to Queensland for the sun and surf. If they can escape the grandparenting roles they look to somewhere cooler, not warmer. So Tassie can be quite appealing and as pointed out, it can be a good move financially for Sydney and Melbourne retirees.

So we have had contact today with people in Townsville, suffering from the floods, from people on the Sunnie Coast, still praying for rain and from people in Hobart, still choked from bushfire smoke. The 'My Country' scenario all in one week.
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Old 02-03-2019, 11:17 PM
 
1,005 posts, read 607,387 times
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Why are folk so down on Tasmania? Sure it's not Sydney or Melbourne, or a place for corporate high flyers, but that's what's good about it...... But if the choice is between the South Island of NZ or Tasmania, I'd opt for the island state because it is close to those cities.
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Old 02-04-2019, 01:06 AM
 
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Default but then there is 1080!

But then there is the dreaded 1080 poison which is highly controversial in NZ to get rid of so called "pests" that are apparently destroying the eco system, but I think poison has a more of a horrid affect esp after 60 years of dropping it out of helicopters,...as an animal lover, I lean towards Australia more in that way, as we have so many more birds and our wildlife is - well you cannot compare. The 1080 pOison is a huge issue in NZ and it gets into the water ways, and is in the soil and kills everything. Australia is more natural and more organic in that way and I hope they don't ever copy to the extent of how NZ poisons its land. Also If you love the oceans and beaches, Tassie is for you - if you love green rolling hills and snow capped mountains NZ is for you. If you like the heat - Tassie, and if you prefer the cooler, NZ. I have not been to Tas but have lived in Australia and seen a fair bit of NZ mostly in the south. Very hard to compare, so beautiful...both countries
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Old 02-04-2019, 03:01 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
16,655 posts, read 13,146,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Racheal Welsh View Post
But then there is the dreaded 1080 poison which is highly controversial in NZ to get rid of so called "pests" that are apparently destroying the eco system, but I think poison has a more of a horrid affect esp after 60 years of dropping it out of helicopters,...as an animal lover, I lean towards Australia more in that way, as we have so many more birds and our wildlife is - well you cannot compare. The 1080 pOison is a huge issue in NZ and it gets into the water ways, and is in the soil and kills everything. Australia is more natural and more organic in that way and I hope they don't ever copy to the extent of how NZ poisons its land. Also If you love the oceans and beaches, Tassie is for you - if you love green rolling hills and snow capped mountains NZ is for you. If you like the heat - Tassie, and if you prefer the cooler, NZ. I have not been to Tas but have lived in Australia and seen a fair bit of NZ mostly in the south. Very hard to compare, so beautiful...both countries
The South Island also has plenty of beaches and ocean]] and possibly more variation as well, having about 2.5 times the coastline. Also slightly warmer water in the north - Tassie looks pretty nice also, so it's really just a preference thing.

Not really much between the two for heat, with the warmest towns pretty close, and the South Island has had the hottest temperature of the two - The South Island is quite a bit more extreme than Tasmania, being hotter, colder, drier and wetter.

Last edited by Joe90; 02-04-2019 at 03:32 AM..
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Old 02-05-2019, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,687 posts, read 4,571,740 times
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People have commented about the lack of insulation and central heat in homes in NZ. Why is that exactly- I mean why is this so widespread? As with other developed countries, why isn't it standard government code to build homes with a certain level of insulation? And if people want/need it, why is central heating not just a standard feature in new homes? Generally in places like the US that is not necessarily a law (as far as I know), but it's considered standard because people want/expect it, so builders would never consider building a home without it.
I understand in a poor/developing country how it can be different, where people simply can't afford it and expectations are low- but in a place like NZ it's really interesting why people have tolerated this for so long.
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Old 02-05-2019, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
16,655 posts, read 13,146,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm31828 View Post
People have commented about the lack of insulation and central heat in homes in NZ. Why is that exactly- I mean why is this so widespread? As with other developed countries, why isn't it standard government code to build homes with a certain level of insulation? And if people want/need it, why is central heating not just a standard feature in new homes? Generally in places like the US that is not necessarily a law (as far as I know), but it's considered standard because people want/expect it, so builders would never consider building a home without it.
I understand in a poor/developing country how it can be different, where people simply can't afford it and expectations are low- but in a place like NZ it's really interesting why people have tolerated this for so long.
It's really just an issue for a percentage of rental properties, and is made worse by those tenants who have a poor understanding of the need for ventilation.

Mandatory insulation requirements have been around for more than 40 years, but only applied to new builds. Many rental properties are much older than that, but new legislation requiring a minimum level of insulation should remedy that.

Existing older properties owned by the occupiers, have been eligible for a subsidy for quite some time.

Central heating US/European style just isn't necessary (maybe in the coldest parts of the country), although forced air ducting from heat pumps and log burners is quite common.

My house (240 square metres),only has a log burner which only goes in the evening and some mornings, for about 4 months of the year.
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Old 02-05-2019, 11:28 PM
 
1,005 posts, read 607,387 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
It's really just an issue for a percentage of rental properties, and is made worse by those tenants who have a poor understanding of the need for ventilation.

Mandatory insulation requirements have been around for more than 40 years, but only applied to new builds. Many rental properties are much older than that, but new legislation requiring a minimum level of insulation should remedy that.

Existing older properties owned by the occupiers, have been eligible for a subsidy for quite some time.

Central heating US/European style just isn't necessary (maybe in the coldest parts of the country), although forced air ducting from heat pumps and log burners is quite common.

My house (240 square metres),only has a log burner which only goes in the evening and some mornings, for about 4 months of the year.
I live in a colder part of Aus and my house has central heating, as do most in the area. But I'm not convinced its actually the "best" way to heat a home, simply because there are other options that make it far easier to adjust temperatures room by room, including zero heating in areas that aren't in active use for days or weeks.
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Old 02-05-2019, 11:45 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
16,655 posts, read 13,146,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
I live in a colder part of Aus and my house has central heating, as do most in the area. But I'm not convinced its actually the "best" way to heat a home, simply because there are other options that make it far easier to adjust temperatures room by room, including zero heating in areas that aren't in active use for days or weeks.
What part of Aussie?, and what sort of system?

Forced air ducting could technically be considered as central heating, but I usually consider it to be gas/oil heating unit, and hot water radiators. A total overkill, when the room temperature on a standard sunny winter day can be close to or match that of a standard central heating setting.

Good point about unused rooms - when I've lived in cold places overseas, an unheated room was regarded as detrimental to heating efficiency overall, while in NZ/Aussie, very few areas are cold enough for that to be an issue.
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