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Old 04-02-2009, 08:41 AM
 
Location: St. Joseph Area
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I had a question for you guys: Since we've all--at one point--been part of the British Empire, each of us have some trace of British culture, with some more than others. So I was wondering what facets of Aussie and Kiwi culture have British elements? I think Cricket is popular in Australia, and I've heard that Kiwis are generally more "british" than Aussies.

Love to hear what you have to say...

mackinac
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Old 04-02-2009, 07:53 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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About 80% of 'Aussie' and 'Kiwi' culture for that matter is British. A lot of our slang - words like 'crickey', for example, are very British, specifically Southeastern English British. Most of our cuisine and eating habits followed the British; meat pies, fish'n'chips, roasts. We were almost a colony of Britain until the 1960s, and that's how they treated us, as a bunch of colonials composed of the lower classes of British society.
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Old 04-02-2009, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Way up north :-)
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Well, my nickname for Oz is "Little Britain" if that tells you anything! But then, I *am* hyper-sensitive to the Britishness of this place. Too much, too much, can't cope, leaving thread now....
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Old 04-02-2009, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
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Beer and pub culture here too. Although different and not as nice as back home, according to English friends. There, you can just walk down to your local and it's more of a community thing, which is how I felt when I visited there. Here, in most cases you have to drive there and they say it seems a bit cold, not as friendly, without the long-term patrons. Probably the weather has a lot to do with that. Cold English nights, long winters, are more conducive to getting cozy in a pub with a roaring fire and getting along. Here, it's more outdoors oriented, with more being outside in beer gardens, or at barbeques in their backyards, the park or beach.

Some of my Australian friends with British background are still into the Sunday roasts, and three meat and veg type of "cuisine". Very plain, bland, and, imo, boring. But that's just the way they were raised. They find my cooking quite exotic, stuff they only get in restaurants apparently. But I think that's dying off with the younger generation. Lots of young Aussies with British background tend to go to England for a year or so to experience their culture. Some end up staying.

But if you're not of British background, it really doesn't have a big impact on your life. I hate cricket, never watch it, never will. Hate the typical overcooked and bland meat-and-three-veg meals. Not fond of meat pies and sausage rolls either. England holds little appeal for me, I'd rather head towards my southern European ancestral home.
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Old 04-02-2009, 08:34 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
Beer and pub culture here too. Although different and not as nice as back home, according to English friends. There, you can just walk down to your local and it's more of a community thing, which is how I felt when I visited there. Here, in most cases you have to drive there and they say it seems a bit cold, not as friendly, without the long-term patrons. Probably the weather has a lot to do with that. Cold English nights, long winters, are more conducive to getting cozy in a pub with a roaring fire and getting along. Here, it's more outdoors oriented, with more being outside in beer gardens, or at barbeques in their backyards, the park or beach.

Some of my Australian friends with British background are still into the Sunday roasts, and three meat and veg type of "cuisine". Very plain, bland, and, imo, boring. But that's just the way they were raised. They find my cooking quite exotic, stuff they only get in restaurants apparently. But I think that's dying off with the younger generation. Lots of young Aussies with British background tend to go to England for a year or so to experience their culture. Some end up staying.

But if you're not of British background, it really doesn't have a big impact on your life. I hate cricket, never watch it, never will. Hate the typical overcooked and bland meat-and-three-veg meals. Not fond of meat pies and sausage rolls either. England holds little appeal for me, I'd rather head towards my southern European ancestral home.
I'm not of Anglo-Saxon heritage, but Australia's second-hand British culture has a big impact on my life. Actually I'm not a huge fan of roast; it's nutritious and hearty, but not very tasty...I love a good meat pie, I drink beer at the pub on occasion, cricket is fun to play but boring to watch. Actually, being a speaker of English I kinda feel like an adopted Englishman in some ways, corny as it sounds...I love the English countryside, and I think my temperament is kind of British. Sometimes I think I should've been born there! Kind of ironically, though, I hold a colonial resentment towards them, and there are some facets of British culture I don't like at all.

And yes, about the pubs, it really depends...Australia doesn't have the village culture of England, but some smaller country pubs have very regular patrons and a real sense of community. Most city pubs are just rowdy booze-barns.
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Old 04-02-2009, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I'm not of Anglo-Saxon heritage, but Australia's second-hand British culture has a big impact on my life. Actually I'm not a huge fan of roast; it's nutritious and hearty, but not very tasty....
When us wogs do a roast mate, it's tasty! Garlic, garlic, and more garlic, and herbs and spices. Things my Anglo-Aussie friends, and particularly their parents, don't use much of, or at all. Nothing smells worse than a roast lamb with nothing on it. Lamb, in particular, needs some help in the aroma department.

I'm not Greek but my favourite way to do lamb is a Greek-style, slow-cooked leg sitting in lemon juice, lemon zest, olive oil, white wine, oregano, and garlic, garlic, garlic! About two cups of liquid should go in the pan. With peeled potatoes cut in half, lengthwise, sitting around it. Put the lid on, and slow-cook it. It steams this wonderful garlicky-lemony-lamb juice stuff throughout the lamb and potatoes. I learned this recipe from my Greek friend's mum in Vancouver.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I love the English countryside,.
Definitely something to be said for the English countryside, or pretty much any central European countryside. And Canadian countryside. That green is pretty appealing, the deep, emerald green. The Australian countryside is a different beautiful though. Different colours. The greens are subtler. The red earth is something else. Put the two together and it's quite colourful, especially against the intensely blue sky.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Kind of ironically, though, I hold a colonial resentment towards them, and there are some facets of British culture I don't like at all.
I don't seem to hold any resentment towards the Poms. It's all in the past as far as I'm concerned. I mean, yeah, it was pretty crappy the way they sent Aussies off to their certain deaths in the past wars, like at Gallipoli. But it was a different era.

My English friends say there's still the old class system in Britain. One friend said you could be at the shop, waiting your turn to be served, and if in comes some toff Lord or Lady something or other, they're served right away, butting in front of everyone waiting. I think that's crap and should be dropped.
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Old 04-02-2009, 11:03 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,159,772 times
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^ Exactly, that kind of 'Lord this', 'sir', 'madam' - I'm glad we don't have that here. Maybe 'resentment' is a bit of a strong word, more a good-natured rivalry. All modern Aussies would understand deep down the Brits are the reason for our existence. Someone had to take the land from the aborigines .

And yes, you wogs have contributed very positively to the cuisine of Australia . So much so pizza and pasta is standard pub fare...yes, a large reason why I don't find roast that exciting is because English food is traditionally so bland and un-spiced - I love garlic, and most kinds of herbs and spaces, btw, really adds to the flavour of the food.
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Old 04-03-2009, 12:44 AM
 
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
141 posts, read 296,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mackinac81 View Post
I had a question for you guys: Since we've all--at one point--been part of the British Empire, each of us have some trace of British culture, with some more than others. So I was wondering what facets of Aussie and Kiwi culture have British elements? I think Cricket is popular in Australia, and I've heard that Kiwis are generally more "british" than Aussies.

Love to hear what you have to say...

mackinac
They say christchurch, New Zealand is the most Engish city out of England. Never really thought it was that English until I lived in England for 3 years, then came back home - it is actually quite English.
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Old 04-03-2009, 05:33 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,159,772 times
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Originally Posted by muir33 View Post
They say christchurch, New Zealand is the most Engish city out of England. Never really thought it was that English until I lived in England for 3 years, then came back home - it is actually quite English.
Christchurch reminds me of Oxford. Maybe it's founders were thinking of Christ Church College in Oxford too.

Dunedin must be the most Scottish city outside of Scotland.
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Old 04-03-2009, 06:23 AM
 
Location: St. Joseph Area
6,237 posts, read 8,248,820 times
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Interesting posts, I never thought about the pub culture. I have another question: How do most Australians and kiwis feel about the monarchy? I've heard of a republican movement in Oz and the 1999 referendum, but that was ten years ago.
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