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Old 10-19-2009, 08:05 PM
 
9,912 posts, read 12,181,640 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacq63 View Post
I understand LL Bean is THE clothing range to have to enjoy an NE winter. I don't know about cost etc, but I don't think there's any risk you'll look drastically different from anyone else. Unless Victorians really are aliens? Anyway, once you start speaking, how you look is a moot point.
bwahahaha!!!

Maybe I'll end up doing that thing I do when I'm surrounded by a different majority accent and start talking like a New Englander? Wouldn't be the first time that's happened.

Thanks jacqs. I do know about LL Bean because I've been researching on the googles and figure if Super Walmart can't save me I'll head over there.

(There does seem to be subtle differences in how we dress though. Still haven't managed to put my finger on it but it's a bit like the differences in our home decorating. )

AND I'll have to wear SOCKS all of the time. AND enclosed shoes. And maybe even HATS!!! Too much clothing.

Anyway, best I get back to overheating myself by trying on jumpers and long pants and SOCKS and SHOES in this Melbourne heat.
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Old 10-19-2009, 08:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
Mmmmmmmmm, YUMMMMM! Turkey! Cranberry sauce - if you have any say in the meal, ask if you can have it made from fresh cranberries, if they're available. It makes a world of difference. I used to make my cranberry sauce from the fresh berries when I lived in Canada, and any time I visited around Thanksgiving (theirs is October). The jar stuff is alright but hey, if you can, go for the fresh homemade stuff. Very easy to make - just boil them up in water and sugar. Make it ahead of time as it has to set. And you can control the sugar as we like ours on the tart side. I make it here with the frozen ones.
Well the thing is, I'm not really a fan of Turkey but I'm hoping that my suspicions are confirmed and Yankee turkey is better than the Aussie stuff. It's gotta be really because otherwise I can't explain why Americans like it so much.
We're actually going to an ye olde time Thanksgiving event so I'm not sure what the status of the cranberry sauce will be other than it will be there. BUT I suspect that it will be made fresh on account according to the buffet listing and the activities listing they're doing a lot of things in the traditional way.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
A "little" shopping??? Just a little???? OMG, the dollar's way up there. I'd be going crazy, even crazier than usual. Last trip we took two suitcases - one smaller one packed with a few things, inside a bigger empty one. Filled them both, each, so four in total And even better was the fact that I'd paid for the tickets back in Nov 2008 when the luggage weight limits were higher - 75lbs! The two bigger suitcases were within ounces of that Maple syrup, art, shoes, kitchen stuff, clothes, chocolate bars you can't get here, pure vanilla extract from Costco (much cheaper than here), etc., etc. And I was wearing about half a kilo of silver jewelry from the Southwest

Funny thing is, I'm not much of a shopper ordinarily. In fact, I kinda hate it. I guess it's just the limited variety here, and the higher prices. But mostly the selection. The buyers here seem to think we're all 19 years old and want to show loads of skin. Plus the quality of fabrics used here is noticeably poorer.
Well it's not that I don't like shopping it's just that I'm at a point where I have too much "stuff" and I'm not sure I want to add a whole winter wardrobe to it. Not to mention I simply cannot afford not to keep a reign on my spending habits. If I think to myself, "Oh no biggy, I'll just go shopping over there." I know exactly how big of a mess I could make and just how much it would cost me to get it home. I'm planning on getting a few books and definitely some Butterfingers and maybe some boots. I know I'll end up with more than that and I'll probably end up having to post things back like I did last time but for now if I don't think in terms of "a little shopping" things could get real ugly, real fast. I LOVE SHOPPING.

The other thing that puts me off is this "extra bag" fee in the US.
Qantas will let you take two bags up to a certain weight on International flights BUT once you get to the US and get an internal flight you have to pay for the second bag and the weight limits go down. What I should have done was send a bunch of my winter clothes back with MM while he was here but I didn't think of it till a couple of weeks back. AND I wish there was a way to bring back this Butterfingers Ice Cream I'm busting to try.
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Old 10-19-2009, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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FYI, when were having one of our milder spells in winter or if the cold just isn't that harsh, most people are comfortable in long pants, a light-weight shirt or t-shirt and a winter coat overtop, maybe gloves stuffed in the pockets just in case. That way when you get inside you are dressed to be perfectly comfortable the instant you step inside and remove your coat.

You'd wear "open-toed shoes" in throughout winter in Melbourne?
Generally speaking, they are distinctly Spring, Summer and maybe Autumn fashion here. ()
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Old 10-19-2009, 08:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
FYI, when were having one of our milder spells in winter or if the cold just isn't that harsh, most people are comfortable in long pants, a light-weight shirt or t-shirt and a winter coat overtop, maybe gloves stuffed in the pockets just in case. That way when you get inside you are dressed to be perfectly comfortable the instant you step inside and remove your coat.
Thanks. That's what I'm aiming for. And I'm packing my waterproof pants and jacket to go over the top of my normal clothes, combined with thermals underneath for more extended outdoor activities. Plus a plethora of gloves, hats and scarves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
You'd wear "open-toed shoes" in throughout winter in Melbourne?
Generally speaking, they are distinctly Spring, Summer and maybe Autumn fashion here. ()
Open heeled for winter. Almost all my winter shoes are mules.

Search results for mules - Walmart
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Old 10-19-2009, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moonshadow View Post
Thanks. That's what I'm aiming for. And I'm packing my waterproof pants and jacket to go over the top of my normal clothes, combined with thermals underneath for more extended outdoor activities. Plus a plethora of gloves, hats and scarves.



Open heeled for winter. Almost all my winter shoes are mules.

Search results for mules - Walmart
You might want to save your thermals for days you aren't going to be indoors much. They'll be as warm as keeping a light coat on, which makes you VERY warm within a 1/2 hr.

Room temp tends to be comfortable unto itself, irrelevant to the outdoor weather or season. While this may seem excessively warm on the ordinary winter days, this is greatly appreciated if you have spent a long time outside and/or when it does get severely cold.

A -15 C or colder day will make you HAPPY to see it +22 C indoors, instead of only +15-18 C indoors.


Nice shoes.
They look comfy and reasonably-warm for the moderately-cold mornings that I'd expect in a southern Oz winter.
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Old 10-19-2009, 09:26 PM
 
9,912 posts, read 12,181,640 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
You might want to save your thermals for days you aren't going to be indoors much. They'll be as warm as keeping a light coat on, which makes you VERY warm within a 1/2 hr.

Room temp tends to be comfortable unto itself, irrelevant to the outdoor weather or season. While this may seem excessively warm on the ordinary winter days, this is greatly appreciated if you have spent a long time outside and/or when it does get severely cold.

A -15 C or colder day will make you HAPPY to see it +22 C indoors, instead of only +15-18 C indoors.
Yeah, I figure that is going to be the hardest part. Dressing so as not to get overheated indoors. Particularly when I'm in places where I have no control over the thermostat. That's an issue for me here already so goodness knows how I'll cope over there.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Nice shoes.
They look comfy and reasonably-warm for the moderately-cold mornings that I'd expect in a southern Oz winter.
Those aren't exactly like mine as mine are a little more "formal" looking at the front with a loafer style but yeah, no backs on them and I find them really comfy and versatile here for the winter and rarely is it cold enough that I would wear them out with socks.
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Old 10-19-2009, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moonshadow View Post
Yeah, I figure that is going to be the hardest part. Dressing so as not to get overheated indoors. Particularly when I'm in places where I have no control over the thermostat. That's an issue for me here already so goodness knows how I'll cope over there.
Thermals are a great idea if you expect to be "in and out" a lot, OR if you have the opportunity to go outside and cool off if you get heated up too much; likely once you get a chill (5-10 minutes at minus 10 C?) with the thermals, you should be comfy for at least 40 min indoors. (ie. Don't plan to go to shopping in an indoor mall in thermals, or a nice sit-down restaurant if you don't like being VERY warm. )

Once you get acclimated to our winters,
you should be fine for at least 10-20 minutes without thermals or layers,
say when it's -10 C or warmer without crazy wind.

You can either bring clothes to suit your activity (ideal) or dress according to what you think you'll be doing.
It's not actually that difficult, just involves a little foresight.

If I had never lived in a cold climate, even I would probably enjoy experiencing ONE winter up here, if only for the "adventure."
Strange and funny things can happen below -10 C, and I don't regret some of my experiences with extreme cold.

I probably whinge like a baby about our cold only because I've been through decades of it,
I discovered I didn't prefer snowy-winters 20 years ago,
and it's the semi-permanent disposition of "cold-weather" that bothers me the most.


*I would also like to have a vacation somewhere scorching-hot, say dry and 40-50 C, or muggy and 30-40 C;
no I don't expect "comfort," but the challenges and bizarreness of it would be like an adventure for me too.
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Old 10-19-2009, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,595 posts, read 22,894,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moonshadow View Post
Those aren't exactly like mine as mine are a little more "formal" looking at the front with a loafer style but yeah, no backs on them and I find them really comfy and versatile here for the winter and rarely is it cold enough that I would wear them out with socks.
Good on ya!
You are definitely hardier than I, but then again most people are.
That sounds like something worth bragging about since in Canada,
even the hardiest souls "need" to try to dress warmer 3-4 months a year.

One thing you might discover here is a point where you open the freezer door,
*you understand that it's well below freezing inside the freezer*
and marvel at how mild it feels inside the freezer!

Last edited by ColdCanadian; 10-19-2009 at 10:27 PM..
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Old 10-19-2009, 10:24 PM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,014,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moonshadow View Post
Well the thing is, I'm not really a fan of Turkey but I'm hoping that my suspicions are confirmed and Yankee turkey is better than the Aussie stuff. It's gotta be really because otherwise I can't explain why Americans like it so much.
We're actually going to an ye olde time Thanksgiving event so I'm not sure what the status of the cranberry sauce will be other than it will be there. BUT I suspect that it will be made fresh on account according to the buffet listing and the activities listing they're doing a lot of things in the traditional way.
I suspect you'll find the American turkey a bit different and better I suspect.
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Old 10-19-2009, 10:57 PM
 
9,912 posts, read 12,181,640 times
Reputation: 7257
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Thermals are a great idea if you expect to be "in and out" a lot, OR if you have the opportunity to go outside and cool off if you get heated up too much; likely once you get a chill (5-10 minutes at minus 10 C?) with the thermals, you should be comfy for at least 40 min indoors. (ie. Don't plan to go to shopping in an indoor mall in thermals, or a nice sit-down restaurant if you don't like being VERY warm. )

Once you get acclimated to our winters,
you should be fine for at least 10-20 minutes without thermals or layers,
say when it's -10 C or warmer without crazy wind.

You can either bring clothes to suit your activity (ideal) or dress according to what you think you'll be doing.
It's not actually that difficult, just involves a little foresight.

If I had never lived in a cold climate, even I would probably enjoy experiencing ONE winter up here, if only for the "adventure."
Strange and funny things can happen below -10 C, and I don't regret some of my experiences with extreme cold.

I probably whinge like a baby about our cold only because I've been through decades of it,
I discovered I didn't prefer snowy-winters 20 years ago,
and it's the semi-permanent disposition of "cold-weather" that bothers me the most.

*I would also like to have a vacation somewhere scorching-hot, say dry and 40-50 C, or muggy and 30-40 C;
no I don't expect "comfort," but the challenges and bizarreness of it would be like an adventure for me too.
Yeah, I'm thinking I'll save the thermals for times when the majority of my time will be spent outside. Like when I go ice skating or walking and when I'm going from indoors to an activity indoors I'll just wear my usual clothing and make sure to take my jacket, gloves and scarf for the getting in and out of the car. I suspect for the first couple of weeks I'll be carting a bag of "extra" clothing around for most activities while I work out what I'm comfortable with.

I am looking forward to it though just a little uncertain about how I'll be on account I've really only been exposed to cold enough to snow temperatures maybe for 2 weeks all up in my whole life. I loved South Island New Zealand in the Winter but wasn't really there long enough to get the hang of living in snow.

At least with cold weather you can do some star jumps, jog on the spot, or move a little faster to warm yourself up. When it gets hot, too hot, there's really nothing else you can do besides lie gasping prostrate on the floor trying to suck in oxygen.
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