U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Sports > Auto Racing
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-31-2015, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD/Washington DC
3,451 posts, read 8,150,992 times
Reputation: 2346

Advertisements

I firmly, 100% disagree with the article.

A couple thoughts:

1) The Justin Wilson accident was a freak accident. How many times have you seen a car get hit on the roof or upper body by a large piece of debris? I'm talking about any type of auto racing - Indy Car, Formula One, NASCAR, sprint cars, street stocks, drag car, anything. It rarely happens. Now that doesn't mean Indy Car shouldn't be looking into some sort of enclosed or partially enclosed cockpit (which mind you could create problems for drivers trying to get out of their cars when the car catches on fire, or for emergency crews to access the driver after accidents); I definitely think they should. From what I've heard, they had already been starting to look at this even before the Wilson accident.

2) IMO, the bigger issue facing Indy Car racing is that the people running the series are trying to equalize the cars as much as possible and make it more difficult for superior drivers to literally separate themselves from the pack. This is being done for fan interest purposes; it is also something NASCAR has done for many years (and mind you, side-by-side racing in NASCAR is less dangerous than it is in Indy Car). By many people's accounts, including my own (watched the entire race on TV), is the recent Pocono Indy Car race was a very competitive, entertaining race prior to the Wilson accident. However, drivers running in packs for long stretches of a race, as was the case for most of the Pocono race, is very mentally taxing on the drivers and also makes it more likely there will be accidents. The question here is what is important - more interesting, competitive races or driver safety? If racing organizations don't feel comfortable compromising significantly on the former, what can they do to maximize the latter while still holding races that fans will enjoy?

One other thought - I do think very high speed races on low-banked super-speedways like Pocono and Indianapolis can be very problematic if significant precautions aren't made. On the other hand, you can have severe accidents at lower speed races if parts fail; as an example, the worst previous accident in any race at Pocono, the one in 1988 that ended Bobby Allison's career, was caused by a tire going down on the first lap and a driver t-boning him because he couldn't avoid him. There will always be risk in auto racing; the key is minimizing those risks to the greatest degree you can without losing the essence of auto racing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-31-2015, 12:12 PM
 
9,423 posts, read 7,071,740 times
Reputation: 12183
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHIP72 View Post
I firmly, 100% disagree with the article.

A couple thoughts:

1) The Justin Wilson accident was a freak accident. How many times have you seen a car get hit on the roof or upper body by a large piece of debris? I'm talking about any type of auto racing - Indy Car, Formula One, NASCAR, sprint cars, street stocks, drag car, anything. It rarely happens. Now that doesn't mean Indy Car shouldn't be looking into some sort of enclosed or partially enclosed cockpit (which mind you could create problems for drivers trying to get out of their cars when the car catches on fire, or for emergency crews to access the driver after accidents); I definitely think they should. From what I've heard, they had already been starting to look at this even before the Wilson accident.
I seem to remember Tony Stewart landing on top of Bobby Labonte in "The Big One" at Daytona a few laps before Earnhardt's death

There's a bar that goes down the center of the windshield, or used to (May have changed with the "COT" and now the new car) that was called the Earnhardt bar because, if I recall.. Bill Elliott hit Earnhardt in the windshield at Talladega.. Think that was 97 or so.. Earnhardt was on his side at the time.. Broke his sternum.

It happens.. Because it doesn't happen much doesn't mean it doesn't need to be addressed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-31-2015, 12:28 PM
 
5,221 posts, read 5,086,926 times
Reputation: 9729
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
Go back to the sheet metal coffins that were IndyCars in the 60s. (Hell, drivers didn't even wear helmets).


The switch from gasoline to methanol and now PC ethanol (Total Bull S**t).


Drivers certainly did wear helmets in the 1960's.


Is there really that great of a difference between methanol and ethanol as racing fuels?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2015, 05:58 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,890,268 times
Reputation: 18049
Quote:
Originally Posted by American Luxury View Post
The NFL should be shut down before Indycar.
Yep and boxing before that. There are lots of professions with higher death and injury rates than Indy. Most do not pay near as much either. Last list didn't see race car drivers listed at elast near the top.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-07-2015, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Island of Misfit Toys
5,066 posts, read 2,183,857 times
Reputation: 4514
If it should be shut down it's because it's so poorly run and operated - not because of safety. Racing is dangerous. Everyone knows the risks. INDYcar has poor leadership that doesn't mitigated those risks well enough. So the racing is more dangerous then it should/could be. Either way racing is always going to involve a measure of danger. That's part of the deal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-07-2015, 08:54 PM
 
9,353 posts, read 6,249,009 times
Reputation: 17636
Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
Drivers certainly did wear helmets in the 1960's.


Is there really that great of a difference between methanol and ethanol as racing fuels?
Thin plastic or leather helmets and bandannas over their nose and mouth

nothing like today Indianapolis 500 driver helmets are complex pieces of equipment | Autoweek
Attached Thumbnails
Indy Car Safety is an Ugly Joke-ajfoyt-medium-.jpg  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-07-2015, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
3,682 posts, read 5,845,091 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
Thin plastic or leather helmets and bandannas over their nose and mouth

nothing like today Indianapolis 500 driver helmets are complex pieces of equipment | Autoweek

Get serious and throw in the towel.

I raced motorcycles in the 60s and helmets were already quite advanced. Full-face helmets were introduced in about 1960.

This picture is from 1970 but my helmet was the same Bell fiberglass that I wore in the last half of the 1960s.



They weren't thin plastic. The best ones were fiberglass and other materials were being introduced at the time. Today's are much lighter and more comfortable and have better ventilation and so on, but probably not a whole lot safer.

The Snell Memorial Foundation was founded in 1957 after William Snell died of a head injury in a racing accident. Helmets became much safer after that. Snell Foundation - home

I also knew quite a few car racers, some of whom also raced motorcycles and, of course, they all wore helmets. Approved helmets were mandated in all forms of motor racing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2015, 09:31 PM
 
9,423 posts, read 7,071,740 times
Reputation: 12183
All racing series tend to be too reactionary vs proactive.

Full-face helmets and HANS devices and soft walls were all born from the Earnhardt crash. As I recall, the only two who were still wearing open face helmets when they were mandated were Earnhardt Jr and Dave Marcis.

Window nets were made mandatory after Joe Weatherly hit his head on the wall in a crash

Firesuits were made mandatory after Fireball Roberts' death

Roof Flaps came into being after Rusty Wallace barrel rolled at Daytona and Talladega.

pit road speed limits after one of Bill Elliotts crew members were killed

Helmets on pit road really came about after Mike Lingerfelt was hit and broke his leg at Daytona

They have done some things BEFORE tragedy happened.. Stopping racing back to the caution.. No longer being able to push a car the length of pit road..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Island of Misfit Toys
5,066 posts, read 2,183,857 times
Reputation: 4514
^^the stop racing to the caution was because of Dale Jarrett sitting in the middle of the track crashed with the field racing like crazy folks to the yellow flag - around Jarrett's crashed car. Scary stuff. But exactly, racing is always reactive not proactive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 05:37 PM
 
Location: North York
277 posts, read 233,075 times
Reputation: 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Labonte18 View Post
Full-face helmets and HANS devices and soft walls were all born from the Earnhardt crash. As I recall, the only two who were still wearing open face helmets when they were mandated were Earnhardt Jr and Dave Marcis.


Full face helmets have been mandatory in all forms of major league racing for eons. Except NASCAR.

Safer barriers were developed by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and were in use for several years before NASCAR "invented" them. It's the only good thing that Tony George has ever done and NASCAR has the gall to take credit for it.

HANS devices were mandatory in F1, CART, IRL and sportscar racing well before NASCAR had it's come to Jesus moment when Saint Dale crashed.

When it comes to safety in major league motor racing, NASCAR is by far the worst.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Sports > Auto Racing
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top