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Old 08-31-2010, 12:05 PM
 
10,871 posts, read 41,174,133 times
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I'd want to know what vehicle this is before telling you whether the price is fair or not ...

There's some vehicles where a lot of disassembly is required to get to where the studs can be pressed out and replaced ... and $50 would be a bargain price.

OTOH, there's some vehicles where the studs are out in a matter of seconds and the new ones can be drawn into place with the lug nuts. $50 would be exorbitant for these vehicles.

So, OP ... what are you driving?
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Old 08-31-2010, 12:14 PM
 
19,122 posts, read 21,380,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KoobleKar View Post
No offense Mac_Muz but he cannot even get the shop to replace the studs they ruined let alone doing all that. If they cross-threaded them, it's not a matter of them being rusted or just stuck where anti-seize would have helped anyhow.

No problem Kooblekar, I read it the studs are not yet removed, and he went home with the old tires on the vehical.

In the past I have used a welding trick to get heat on studs, where flame from a torch is too much, like on fancy alloy mags.

I cover the mag wheels with scrap metal as best i can and cardboard and masking tape, which will act as a shield some.

Also I have had customers with no key lock for that type of lug nut, and no other choice but to weld on a big junk nut.
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Old 08-31-2010, 12:26 PM
 
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On my Jeeps, the stud is pressed in through the inside of the brake drum. So you just pull the drum and pound the stud through from the outside of the drum with a hammer or a hammer and punch. Then you just tap the new stud into the hole from the inside of teh drum, replace the drum and put on the wheel.

If you can't get the wheel lug nuts off the stud, you can heat them up with a propane torch, then pound on the next smallest opposite sized socket (metric v. US) and off they come. If that don't work you weld on another nut like Mac says, and, if that don't work and you can get to them ok, you can loosen up the lug nut by cutting some slices in it with a metal cut off wheel, and if that don't work you get a nice titanium bit and drill em out. Note that wheel studs are only hardened on the outside, so as soon as you get through the outside of the stud they drill like butter. Some guys will drill an 1/8" center hole in the end of the stud so the bit doesn't flop around.
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Old 08-31-2010, 01:07 PM
 
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Wilson that jeep is odd man out kinda, as was the 122 volvo which was set up that same way for the studs on the rear drums. Most are pressed into the axel hubs these days, and the rotor/drum pulls off it it too ain't seized on.

Then you need a too big of a nut to press on the new studs pulling it with a nut to get seated, but you know that.

i am ill today and may have misread and misunderstood. I am not sure if the studs are busted off now, or still haven't been yet.....
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Old 08-31-2010, 07:16 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
17,490 posts, read 18,650,831 times
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If ya pound or press them out of a drum, back up the other side or you can possibly warp the drum. Saw it happen on old cast iron drums.
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Old 08-31-2010, 08:17 PM
 
10,871 posts, read 41,174,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motormaker View Post
If ya pound or press them out of a drum, back up the other side or you can possibly warp the drum. Saw it happen on old cast iron drums.
As well as a lot of disc brake hubs, axle hubs, and axle bearings can get damaged from the pounding of a hammer anywhere on the assembly.
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Old 09-01-2010, 12:55 AM
 
Location: Eastern Missouri
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tell them for now on you want them to tighten your wheels with a torque wench that has recently been calibrated, and since their guys use the air tools and over tighten the studs, you will pay for the studs, they can put them in on their own.
Fact is wheel studs that are torqued correctly rarely need to be replaced. The fact you have 2 that need replaced proves idiots have been over torqueing your wheels. By chance have you had any warped brake rotors?
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Old 09-01-2010, 04:53 AM
 
Location: Ohio
2,178 posts, read 7,802,845 times
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Wheels mounted properly almost never end up with ruined studs. You can use an air wrench to run the nuts on using a star pattern to just snug them up and finish tightening with a torgue wrench using the same tightening star pattern.
The star pattern is used to prevent warpage of brake rotors.
If they won't come off because they have been on there for years there are ways to remove them without ruining the studs. Professionals know how to do that.
These people who only use an air wrench and let it bang on each nut after it quits turning is what ruins wheel studs.
I would find another place to have my work done.
I have an 11 year old car I bought new and it has had many tire rotations, brake jobs, etc.
But I'm a retired mechanic and know how to do things properly and I do my own jobs.
My car still has the same wheel studs it had on it when it came out of the show room since this cars brake rotors slip on over the original studs.
As far as someone saying todays tires don't need rotated, I disagree with that.
Especialy since most cars are frt wheel drive.
The frt tires take the forces and wear of pulling, turning, and about 70% of the braking.
The rears just follow, roll, and do about 30% of the braking if it has rear drum brakes.
It is even more important to rotate tires on frt wheel drive cars than rear wheel drive.
The frts do most of the wear causing work. If you dont rotate, you can almost figure on replacing fronts twice for everytime you replace rears.
I rotate very 5,000 miles just to keep equal tread on the tires. I don't want worn out frts and half worn out rears with different traction and road adhesion qualities. I want all four corners working in tandem.
If you don't believe me, drive a car for 10 or 15k miles without rotating and check the tread depth. Especialy at the outside corners of the tires. You'll see why it is important to rotate.
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Old 09-01-2010, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Hernando, FL
749 posts, read 2,018,116 times
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After shearing a few off my Ford Ranger, I always tell my tire guy ...No impact wrenches on my truck. I bought a good four way also if i have to change one roadside. For the real stubborn ones I use a six-point socket with a long breaker bar and then slide a pipe over the breaker bar and it'll do the trick 9/10.
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Old 09-01-2010, 05:53 AM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,424,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robhu View Post
The frts do most of the wear causing work. If you dont rotate, you can almost figure on replacing fronts twice for everytime you replace rears.
I rotate very 5,000 miles just to keep equal tread on the tires. I don't want worn out frts and half worn out rears with different traction and road adhesion qualities. I want all four corners working in tandem.
If you don't believe me, drive a car for 10 or 15k miles without rotating and check the tread depth. Especialy at the outside corners of the tires. You'll see why it is important to rotate tires on front wheel drive cars.
There I fixed it for you.

My MB 300SEL is sitting in the driveway with 31000 miles on a set of Michelin Energy's and I'd bet you $1000 you couldn't tell which are the back and which are the front tires from the tread.
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