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Old 09-05-2010, 07:41 AM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,404,584 times
Reputation: 8239

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Narfcake View Post
There, I fixed it for you.

If that's what you want to believe, then fine, whatever; your sarcasm doesn't bother me at all. Instead, how about showing us some evidence that one can properly repair a sidewall on a passenger car radial? Here's a source backing up my perspective.

In the meantime, just stay the **** away from any of us here if you're driving on such a tire, please. The underline is for proper grammatical use, BTW.

Did I miss the science on your theory that a sidewall nail hole increases the likelihood of tire failure? I saw the tire store poster you linked: hahaha! That's your idea of a "source."

You were called on it and haven't produced squat except a spelling correction.

You have nothing. So take your theory back to your tire store or wherever you heard it.
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Old 09-05-2010, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
4,464 posts, read 9,630,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wilson1010 View Post
Did I miss the science on your theory that a sidewall nail hole increases the likelihood of tire failure? I saw the tire store poster you linked: hahaha! That's your idea of a "source."

You were called on it and haven't produced squat except a spelling correction.

You have nothing. So take your theory back to your tire store or wherever you heard it.
Isn't it common sense?

There's a lot of strain on the tire side wall and it's not nearly as reinforced as the driving surface is.

Giving how cheap (considering their importance and the technology involved) tires are, I fully understand why no one wants to fix a sidewall damage, especially in a country where people will sue the maker of an alarm clock if they get in late for work.
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Old 09-05-2010, 08:14 AM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,404,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheViking85 View Post
Isn't it common sense?

Like the excuse of not working on a six year old tire (some tires are rotted in 3 years, some in 15), a nail hole beyond the tread is not a problem. Tires do not fail because of holes in the sidewalls. Think of polymer tire cording as more like a blanket than a balloon. You stick a pin in a blanket. Does it hurt the fabric? Of course not.
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Old 09-05-2010, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
4,464 posts, read 9,630,498 times
Reputation: 2819
Quote:
Originally Posted by wilson1010 View Post
Like the excuse of not working on a six year old tire (some tires are rotted in 3 years, some in 15), a nail hole beyond the tread is not a problem. Tires do not fail because of holes in the sidewalls. Think of polymer tire cording as more like a blanket than a balloon. You stick a pin in a blanket. Does it hurt the fabric? Of course not.
It depends on the blanket, but you'll often create a weakness that'll make the hole bigger when it's used.

When you puncture the sidewall cord, you can rip it which will expand gradually and could cause an explosive burst under pressure (I've experienced this on a bicycle once, not very pleasant at 30mph).

Considering that the average tire is what? 2-400 bucks? it just isn't worth it.

And again, from the tire shops perspective, especially in the states, there's just too much risk, given the possibility of it failing shortly after the fix.
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Old 09-05-2010, 08:49 AM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,404,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheViking85 View Post
It depends on the blanket, but you'll often create a weakness that'll make the hole bigger when it's used.

When you puncture the sidewall cord, you can rip it which will expand gradually and could cause an explosive burst under pressure (I've experienced this on a bicycle once, not very pleasant at 30mph).

Considering that the average tire is what? 2-400 bucks? it just isn't worth it.

And again, from the tire shops perspective, especially in the states, there's just too much risk, given the possibility of it failing shortly after the fix.
There is no risk other than not selling you a new tire. there has never been a successful claim against a tire store for a sidewall repair failure, and they have insurance. They are 1000 times more likely to be sued for improper tightening of the lug nuts which they do constantly than from a sidewall failure. there is just no way for them to make money off of that like they do refusing to fix your tire.
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Old 09-05-2010, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
4,464 posts, read 9,630,498 times
Reputation: 2819
Well, again, that's one side of it, I wouldn't fix it because I genuinely don't think it's safe, whether you buy the tire from me or not wouldn't have been my priority.

And even if people sue but don't get anything you'll be tied up in it and have to spend some money or grievance one the whole deal.

But then, this whole industry of lawsuits that you lot have is an entirely different subject.

At the end of the day, my main argument is this: Though it can be safe to fix a tire sidewall puncture (it can be safe to run naked through a war zone too), it's not worth the risk, and if I were the owner of a tire shop, I wouldn't be able to, in good conscience, fix that tire, especially when you consider the low cost of a new one.

Then again, I've never understood people spending copious amounts of money on safe or expensive cars, only to cheap out on the tires.
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Old 09-05-2010, 09:09 AM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,404,584 times
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The same tire store that refuses to repair a little nail hole in a $200 tire, arms an untrained person with a pneumatic impact wrench that has never been calibrated and screws down your lug nuts to an unknown tightness (or not at all hence they fall off) despite the fact that they are supposed to be torqued to specs with a torque wrench. Accidents actually do happen regularly with wheels falling or breaking off.

So they have no credibility on the issue of safety.
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Old 09-05-2010, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Out in the Badlands
10,394 posts, read 8,344,729 times
Reputation: 7679
Just do what they say, don't ask any questions, and Fedzilla will take care of you.
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Old 09-05-2010, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
4,464 posts, read 9,630,498 times
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You keep barking up the wrong tree, you entirely missed my point.
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Old 09-05-2010, 10:08 AM
 
10,139 posts, read 22,404,584 times
Reputation: 8239
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheViking85 View Post
You keep barking up the wrong tree, you entirely missed my point.
I didn't miss your point, I was being polite by not mocking it. You have zero support for the position that a sidewall nail hole repair is any riskier than any other tire repair, other then "common sense." That is my entire point and 10 posts later, you have not cited any science on the subject other than your common sense view that a sidewall is made differently than a tread. It could be that the steel belts in the tread area are more likely to fail from a nail hole than the sidewall. You have no idea, do you, really?
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