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Old 09-10-2010, 09:41 AM
 
19,122 posts, read 21,464,810 times
Reputation: 7319

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tightwad View Post
WOOF !!!

THAT'S A BIG BIKE!!
I had the previous model 1500 Nomad which was stolen, but pulled a trailer with it. The trailer wasn't stolen, and slowly I have worked at getting another hitch and the wiring set up needed to run the trailer again.

Probably by this coming Spring that will be ready and I can use the trailer for local shopping. It would work ok for foods shopping and getting bales of straw, maybe 2 bales at a time with the cargo carrier top off.

More or less bikes get better miles per gallon and this bike beats anything we have here.

Living where I do there is no way life could happen just walking, or riding a pedal bike. The bloomin mail box is 1/2 mile away so to walk there you walk 1 mile round trip and we do every day walk that mile. The dogs like it.
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Old 09-10-2010, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
467 posts, read 1,244,563 times
Reputation: 459
I work 25 miles from home. So, my truck is a necessity since jobs are scarce and I would be a fool to quite right now.

But, truth be told, it wouldn't bother me a bit to go back to the horse and buggy.

I've always felt like I was born 150 years too late.
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Old 09-10-2010, 11:27 AM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,531,088 times
Reputation: 4494
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpeedyAZ View Post
I think formercalifornian makes some very valid and interesting points, she has really got my wheels turning (no pun intended) about the proposition of not using a motor vehicle. I can see if I didn't have a career, that it would be possible to live without a vehicle. I live in a suburban area but Scottsdale is probably the LEAST mass-transit friendly place in the entire valley. If I lived in downtown Phoenix or in Tempe, a car-lite lifestyle would be very possible and could even reach the pinnacle of being efficient.

There aren't many times I get intrigued by a thread but this one really has provoked some thought in my brain. I wouldn't MIND trying a car-lite/free lifestyle but I don't think I'd be able to with my 30 mile commute each day...could be difficult to find mass transit that would make my commuting a wash between driving or take a bus/light-rail.

Interesting idea...
Thanks. I'm glad my posts have been thought-provoking.

I'd like to clarify something about my lifestyle. It wasn't a spur-of-the-moment decision, and we do own one car, which we are gradually using less and less as we find alternative forms of transportation. It took a long time for us to get to this point, and the steps included changing careers, a cross-country move, and a couple of years of hunting for exactly the right house and community, not to mention a great deal of flexibility, a bit of ingenuity, and a good sense of humor. It's not easy, and I fully understand many of the reasons people in this thread have given for not doing it. My kids struggle with it. My spouse struggles with it. I struggle with it. Cars can be extremely convenient, and going without one can be very challenging.

I would never expect that somebody who lives out in the sticks could go car-free, nor do I think that the world would be a better place if everybody suddenly moved to the city and used bikes to get around. However, I love my car-lite existence, even with all its challenges. Life, for me, is better this way. My personal experience with living a car-dependent exurban lifestyle was not fulfilling at all.

I have enjoyed this discussion, and I, too, have learned a few things. Sunsprit, in particular, has inspired me to think more deeply about the relationship between the pro-car and anti-car crowd and issues of fair road use, topics I had not considered until this point. Interesting stuff.

Anyway, I'm off to do other things. Chow, all!
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Old 09-10-2010, 03:03 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
17,553 posts, read 18,714,334 times
Reputation: 47172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post


FAIL.



[ETA: Or at least that's what it said before you edited your post. ]
Apology accepted.
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Old 09-10-2010, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Mountains of middle TN
5,232 posts, read 13,604,784 times
Reputation: 6011
Considering my job is a 2 hour drive from my home, yeh, I think need is definitely a good category for me. And we live about half an hour from the closest stores for any shopping. Yep. Need.
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Old 09-10-2010, 09:29 PM
 
12,579 posts, read 12,848,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonarrat View Post
Just a point of curiosity. If you didn't have a car, could you get by? I got to thinking what my life would be like if I didn't have it as a musician. There are certain things I could still do easily, some I could do only with difficulty, and some that could not be done at all.

There is a grocery store nearby, so that's not a problem. I could still get to my day job and back, too, but it would take 2 additional hours out of my day unless I braved the rush-hour traffic on my bicycle every day. I could get to and from one of the after-school choirs where I work, but the second choir and the church job would have to go - there's no public transport nearby and it's miles from the train station, uphill. To do my laundry, I would need to take two buses at a cost of $6 a round trip, since there are no hookups in my rental house. And I would need to give piano lessons in my home instead of going to theirs, which would cause me to lose most if not all of my current students with their crazy schedules.

tl;dr version: it's possible for me to do without a car, but it would mean giving up a significant amount of income.
No way. I have a company vehicle, if that counts, and can do 200 mi a day easily.
We have 2 personal vehicles and could probably manage with just one. Even though I live in the city limits everything is sprawled out to the point if you were to walk to your errands it would consume a significant amount of time.
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Old 09-11-2010, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,022 posts, read 17,022,606 times
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[quote=formercalifornian;15832896] However, I love my car-lite existence, even with all its challenges. Life, for me, is better this way. My personal experience with living a car-dependent exurban lifestyle was not fulfilling at all. [quote]

Interesting. But it would be more interesting if you could share with us exactly why life is better with your car-lite existence, and exactly why your car-dependent exurban lifestyle was not fulfilling. Some specifics, some details, not about strategies, but about your reactions to the experiences.
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Old 09-13-2010, 05:59 PM
 
5,019 posts, read 12,496,989 times
Reputation: 6952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merc63 View Post
Of course our CHOICES to live and work at those distances makes owning a car a necesssity in order to accomplish that livestyle. But the fact that it was achoice to begin with means the car sint' actually a necessity. Youd simply have to choose to live and work and get supplies in a much smaller area (of course, then your costs of living could go up due to having to rent/buy more expensive property that is closer and more convenient to work/play/supplies, so total costs could still be a wash).

Thanks for bringing up the choice issue. I'm kind of surprised by the number of fatalists on the board here.

"I HAVE to have a car because I HAVE to live in Point A and I HAVE to work at Point B doing X Job".

Really . Really?

So you've given up your Human Right to Free Will. The Mighty Auto Industry Trumps All.

Wow.

Choosing a car-free (or car-lite) lifestyle isn't always easy, or brainless, or even less expensive.

It took us a few years of careful planning to get everything in place. Work Home. Life.

The payoff?

Much less stress and overall a higher quality of life.

Lunches at home. Noon-time runs and walks. Plenty of time after work for bike rides and home projects and yard work and books.

No more sitting in traffic. No more road rage. No more drive-thru dinners.

Bye bye high insurance premiums. Bye bye wear and tear on the van,. Bye bye time spent on maintenance ( we only need an oil change once per year!).

When we DO drive, it's because we WANT to. We want to pick up mulch at the garden center. We want to travel to visit family. We want to ride a new trail out of state or dine at an out-of-town restaurant.

If you can't tell, I'm a fan of humans having choices in life. Don't get stuck in the "HAVE to" mentality too much.
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Old 09-13-2010, 06:40 PM
 
Location: 'Murica
1,302 posts, read 2,352,230 times
Reputation: 803
my situation is pretty car-lite (~5,000-6,000 mi/year), thanks entirely to me being able to find suitable housing near my work. Commuting to work without a car would be a no-go if I worked in Beverly Hills (too expensive to live in) or in the ghetto (too unsafe to live in)
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Old 09-13-2010, 07:10 PM
 
10,891 posts, read 41,348,825 times
Reputation: 14066
Quote:
Originally Posted by plaidmom View Post
Thanks for bringing up the choice issue. I'm kind of surprised by the number of fatalists on the board here.

"I HAVE to have a car because I HAVE to live in Point A and I HAVE to work at Point B doing X Job".

Really . Really?

So you've given up your Human Right to Free Will. The Mighty Auto Industry Trumps All.

Wow.

Choosing a car-free (or car-lite) lifestyle isn't always easy, or brainless, or even less expensive.

It took us a few years of careful planning to get everything in place. Work Home. Life.

The payoff?

Much less stress and overall a higher quality of life.

Lunches at home. Noon-time runs and walks. Plenty of time after work for bike rides and home projects and yard work and books.

No more sitting in traffic. No more road rage. No more drive-thru dinners.

Bye bye high insurance premiums. Bye bye wear and tear on the van,. Bye bye time spent on maintenance ( we only need an oil change once per year!).

When we DO drive, it's because we WANT to. We want to pick up mulch at the garden center. We want to travel to visit family. We want to ride a new trail out of state or dine at an out-of-town restaurant.

If you can't tell, I'm a fan of humans having choices in life. Don't get stuck in the "HAVE to" mentality too much.
Again, your paradigm of "how to live" and what makes you happy may not necessarily jibe with those of us who choose a rural productive lifestyle.

Where, pray tell, in your vision of your lifestyle ... does your food come from?

Where does your energy come from?

Where does the raw materials and goods that furnish your wonderful lifestyle come from?

I can assure you that little of it originates in the city or the urban areas around them. You are totally dependent for your chosen lifestyle from the efforts of others ... otherwise, you'd be living in nothing more than a small village concept community.

It's wonderful if it makes you happy to live close to your work and your recreation and your shopping ... but it's simply not compatable with everybody's chosen lifestyles. I like raising livestock ... poultry, beef, lamb. I like growing vegetables on a large scale ... big enough for CSA shares and a Farmer's Market. And I'll take our low-key country lifestyle, where there also isn't road rage ... and time for pleasant lunches at home, and time to ride my horse after the days' chores are done, or do some local fishing, or simply walk the dogs down by my creek.

I've made my choices, and I'll willing to pay the price for them in insurance, maintenance, and vehicle acquisition costs. I don't believe it's your place to tell me that I'm a slave to an industry ... which has made my ability to be rural and productive for folks in higher density population centers to enjoy my goods .... Without that transportation industry, we wouldn't have densely populated cities because we'd still be an agrarian based culture, living closely to our food sources.

It's also interesting to see how many people flee the city at their first opportunity ... witness the threads for retirement and "simple living" which so many post. It's not simple, and in our area of the country, not easy ... but folk still flock to this area from their working careers at the earliest possible opportunity. Or to other retirement targeted visions ... close to a beach, or lake, or low-key small town where personal transportation is an essential element to living there.
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