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Old 09-14-2010, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
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I'm curious, is this parking brake electrically activated and if so, will it fail in the release position if the battery goes dead?
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Old 09-14-2010, 10:19 PM
 
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sailordave wrote;
Quote:
I'm curious, is this parking brake electrically activated and if so, will it fail in the release position if the battery goes dead?
I have a 2010 Subaru Legacy that has this. If the battery goes dead you can't release the brakes with the switch/lever. There is a mechanical rod in the trunk and the salesman explained it to me at delivery of the car. But, since the last time I set a parking brake was 1969, I didn't pay attention to what he said.
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Old 09-15-2010, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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I never use a parking brake, either. If it's a stick, I just park it in low. Turn the wheels, so if it rolls, it will be heading back up the hill pretty soon. When I learned to drive, it was called the "emergency brake" and I can't recall ever having such an emergency.
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Old 09-15-2010, 06:55 AM
 
805 posts, read 1,558,522 times
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Originally Posted by 1200RT View Post
Lol. I don't think he ever said he got another vw. Was just my guess.
I did get a VW that I'm leasing.
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Old 09-15-2010, 06:57 AM
 
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I never use a parking brake, either. If it's a stick, I just park it in low. Turn the wheels, so if it rolls, it will be heading back up the hill pretty soon. When I learned to drive, it was called the "emergency brake" and I can't recall ever having such an emergency.
What? (I don't understand what you're saying).

Incidentally, the emergency brake (I've always called it the parking brake) in my older car was starting to weaken a little. Had a recent incident in fact where it kind of rolled forward on a hill.

An emergency brake is not necessary for parking in a manual?
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Old 09-15-2010, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,556,197 times
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Originally Posted by superseiyan View Post
What? (I don't understand what you're saying).

Incidentally, the emergency brake (I've always called it the parking brake) in my older car was starting to weaken a little. Had a recent incident in fact where it kind of rolled forward on a hill.

An emergency brake is not necessary for parking in a manual?
Of course not. Try pushing a car that is parked in low gear with the engine shut off. If you push hard enough, the tires will make black marks dragging on the pavement. The engine and transmission will lock the drive wheels tighter than any parking brake can. That's why there is a P in PRNDL. Because automatics are free-wheeling.
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Old 09-15-2010, 09:47 AM
 
805 posts, read 1,558,522 times
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Of course not. Try pushing a car that is parked in low gear with the engine shut off. If you push hard enough, the tires will make black marks dragging on the pavement. The engine and transmission will lock the drive wheels tighter than any parking brake can. That's why there is a P in PRNDL. Because automatics are free-wheeling.
So you mean to park in 1st gear, rather than neutral? (In terms of reducing the ability of the car to roll).
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Old 09-15-2010, 09:54 AM
 
Location: SoCal, Idaho
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Originally Posted by superseiyan View Post
So you mean to park in 1st gear, rather than neutral? (In terms of reducing the ability of the car to roll).
I think thats what he is getting at. You should always park a manual trans car in gear. I don't think this is a substitute for using the parking brake, but it WILL certainly keep the car from rolling. I'm hesitant to recommend letting the weight of the car roll back on the transmission, but i've heard argument on both sides.
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Old 09-16-2010, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Pikesville, MD
5,229 posts, read 11,487,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I never use a parking brake, either. If it's a stick, I just park it in low. Turn the wheels, so if it rolls, it will be heading back up the hill pretty soon. When I learned to drive, it was called the "emergency brake" and I can't recall ever having such an emergency.
I've rarely "had" to use it, but the idea was that it had to, by law, be a purely mechanical brake that could be used in emergencies if the hydraulic service brakes failed. Say a brake line got old and rusty and just burst while using the brakes one time.

I don't think I'd trust an electronic servo "emergency brake" that woud have more problems in an emergency. And also, they are not progressive: i.e. you can't put them on just a little to slow you vs locking up the wheels. And for those of use used to using the emergency brake as asort of "hill holder" on steep city hills (like in Seattle and San Francisco), they might be a little less useful than we'd like...
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Old 09-16-2010, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Pikesville, MD
5,229 posts, read 11,487,380 times
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In fact, in the CFR, FMVSS section 105 (CFR 571.105) it states:

S5.2 Parking Brake System. Each vehicle shall be manufactured with a parking brake system of a friction type with a solely mechanical means to retain engagement, which shall under the conditions of S6, when tested according to the procedures specified in S7, meet the requirements specified in S5.2.1, S5.2.2, or S5.2.3 as appropriate, with the system engagedó

And in 571.135, it states:

S5.2. Parking brake system. Each vehicle shall be equipped with a parking brake system of a friction type with solely mechanical means to retain engagement.

S5.3.1. The service brakes shall be activated by means of a foot control. The control of the parking brake shall be independent of the service brake control, and may be either a hand or foot control.

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations:

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations:
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