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Unread 10-13-2010, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,049 posts, read 2,719,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
The Y generation is merely smaller compared to the boomers, not to mention the fact that cars last longer than they used to and new ones are expensive compared to salaries.
According to the article, Gen Y is the biggest generation in US history and there are more than the baby boomers. I don't know the parameters, but that is what the article says
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Unread 10-13-2010, 01:00 PM
 
13,556 posts, read 13,198,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
According to the article, Gen Y is the biggest generation in US history and there are more than the baby boomers. I don't know the parameters, but that is what the article says
Gen Y is the second largest generation after the baby boomers. In total they are about 80 million strong. In general Gen Y is defined as people born during the "echo boom" between 1983 and 1995. Their parents are generally baby boomers, though the later ones may have Gen X parents.

Gen X is defined as people born between 1961 and 1981. This group is sometimes called the "baby bust" generation as this period was marked by a very low birthrate.

Interestingly neither group claims 1982, so if you were born then, you get to pick. Those of us born between say 1978 and 1985 are really on the cusp between the two and share characteristics of both. I guess it could be broken down by whether or not you gave a crap when Kurt Cobain died. If you do, then you're X, if not, then you're Y. lol
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Unread 10-13-2010, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
8,784 posts, read 10,952,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
Gen Y is the second largest generation after the baby boomers. In total they are about 80 million strong. In general Gen Y is defined as people born during the "echo boom" between 1983 and 1995. Their parents are generally baby boomers, though the later ones may have Gen X parents.

Gen X is defined as people born between 1961 and 1981. This group is sometimes called the "baby bust" generation as this period was marked by a very low birthrate.

Interestingly neither group claims 1982, so if you were born then, you get to pick. Those of us born between say 1978 and 1985 are really on the cusp between the two and share characteristics of both. I guess it could be broken down by whether or not you gave a crap when Kurt Cobain died. If you do, then you're X, if not, then you're Y. lol
LOL crap I was born in '83 and had a nirvana T-shirt loved nirvana and pearl jam during it's heyday and watched the orginal beavis and butthead on MTV.
guess I am Gen-X

I also grew up in the fox body 5.0 and SN-95 4.6 mustang and LT1/LS1 4th Gen camaro Z28/SS as the cars to have in high school before the import crowd took over.
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Unread 10-13-2010, 01:20 PM
 
5,817 posts, read 8,524,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
Gen Y is the second largest generation after the baby boomers. In total they are about 80 million strong. In general Gen Y is defined as people born during the "echo boom" between 1983 and 1995. Their parents are generally baby boomers, though the later ones may have Gen X parents.
If you're going to quote wikipedia you should at least quote the part defining gen y

"The term Generation Y first appeared in an August 1993 Ad Age editorial to describe teenagers of the day, which they defined, at that time, as separate from Generation X, and then aged 12 or younger (born after 1980), as well as the teenagers of the upcoming ten years.[29] "Generation Y" alludes to a succession from "Generation X." Since then, however, the company has used various start dates for the generation.[citation needed]"
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Unread 10-13-2010, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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i think 1978 - 1983 is a transition generation. i am defined as gen x by the cutoff mentioned above and i do identify with some parts of gen x, but identify more strongly with gen y. but i still vividly remember life when computers were still scary and we used encyclopedias.
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Unread 10-13-2010, 02:01 PM
 
13,556 posts, read 13,198,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
If you're going to quote wikipedia you should at least quote the part defining gen y

"The term Generation Y first appeared in an August 1993 Ad Age editorial to describe teenagers of the day, which they defined, at that time, as separate from Generation X, and then aged 12 or younger (born after 1980), as well as the teenagers of the upcoming ten years.[29] "Generation Y" alludes to a succession from "Generation X." Since then, however, the company has used various start dates for the generation.[citation needed]"
um...I wasn't directly quoting wikipedia. The wiki article uses a few sources that I have also read given that my major was PoliSci with a minor in Economics. Also, since I was born in 1980 my classmates and I at college were generally fascinated with the topic in certain classes as we tried to determine exactly where we fit into the definition since we had charcterisitcs of both. I did look at wiki to fact check, but didn't copy and paste the article.

While Ad Age coined the term, the actual definition of the time period that encompasses Gen Y varies greatly depending on source. Most peg the beginning in the early 80's, either 1982 or 1983. The end date is dependent on what source you look at. The population boom reference or "echo boom" was from 1983-1995 and is a distinct period of high birthrate bracketing a generation. Some people continue to reference Gen Y as continuing to the millenium, still others see the cut off as 9/11 and others say that kids born today are Gen Y, not some as of yet named generation, though some names have been suggested such as "Generation M", "Net Gen" and "Google Generation".
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Unread 06-06-2012, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
4,382 posts, read 3,836,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
i think 1978 - 1983 is a transition generation. i am defined as gen x by the cutoff mentioned above and i do identify with some parts of gen x, but identify more strongly with gen y. but i still vividly remember life when computers were still scary and we used encyclopedias.
I'm born in 1983 but I strongly identify with Generation Y (or even younger generations).

This article strongly hits home:

Eight Products The Facebook Generation Will Not Buy: 24/7 Wall St.
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Unread 06-06-2012, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati near
1,529 posts, read 963,316 times
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I was born in 1979 and much of my social circle is slightly older than me, putting us much more in the Gen X camp than Gen Y. I teach college students, most of which are firmly in the Gen Y generation.

I don't see much of a difference when it comes to cars. Maybe it is because most of my friends are professionals and my students are relatively affluent, but the prevailing theme is that cars are a depreciating asset that provides a valuable service so you should limit your exposure to the depreciation by finding the most economical vehicle that meets your individual needs. Even my best friend and his wife who are both lawyers and make a good income with no kids drive cars that were 15-25K when new. Luxury cars are associated with the baby boomer generation.

My college students drive whatever they can afford, and typically it is a 5+ year old 4 cylinder car that was 15-25K when new. They tend to yawn when someone shows up with a 50K+ SUV or sportscar, and laugh at people driving v8 muscle cars. When they get a graduate and get a job, getting a new car is not a high priority. The only people in my extended circles that I see getting excited about getting new cars are my parents' (boomers) age. For Gen X and Gen Y, a car is much like paying a water bill except it's for transportation.
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Unread 06-06-2012, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
4,382 posts, read 3,836,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chemistry_Guy View Post
I was born in 1979 and much of my social circle is slightly older than me, putting us much more in the Gen X camp than Gen Y. I teach college students, most of which are firmly in the Gen Y generation.

I don't see much of a difference when it comes to cars. Maybe it is because most of my friends are professionals and my students are relatively affluent, but the prevailing theme is that cars are a depreciating asset that provides a valuable service so you should limit your exposure to the depreciation by finding the most economical vehicle that meets your individual needs. Even my best friend and his wife who are both lawyers and make a good income with no kids drive cars that were 15-25K when new. Luxury cars are associated with the baby boomer generation.

My college students drive whatever they can afford, and typically it is a 5+ year old 4 cylinder car that was 15-25K when new. They tend to yawn when someone shows up with a 50K+ SUV or sportscar, and laugh at people driving v8 muscle cars. When they get a graduate and get a job, getting a new car is not a high priority. The only people in my extended circles that I see getting excited about getting new cars are my parents' (boomers) age. For Gen X and Gen Y, a car is much like paying a water bill except it's for transportation.
I hear ya. I live in one of the most materialistic areas.. stereotyped by the importance of outside appearances. Every time I drive by a beater, I take note of who's driving it. 90% of the time, it's a young person. Even the older working class immigrants drive nicer cars.

My parents shudder every time they ask about the odometer reading on the old Civic I got from them. It's the same car I took my driving test in back in HS and it's approaching 1/2 of my age. Then they wonder how I can afford the latest smartphone/tablet or to eat out a couple of times a week. When you have no car payment and it only costs you about $0.20/mile to drive (including gas, maintenance, insurance, etc.) it's not difficult.
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Unread 06-07-2012, 11:55 AM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,419 posts, read 4,815,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailordave View Post
My ex-wife (lives in another state with her new husband) said our 19 year old daughter has never felt the desire to even learn how to drive. She's now at a small college living on campus. This seems odd to me. I wanted to learn how to drive before I was a teenager.
But you grew up in a different time. Everyone was in love with cars back then. Gas was cheap. The lure of the open road with beautiful scenery beckoned. And cars looked good.

Now days, gas is expensive. Roads are ways to get from one place to another, not a destination in themselves. The scenery on the roads is mostly strip malls. Cars all look generic, and color choices are limited.
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