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Old 12-27-2010, 10:55 PM
 
3,190 posts, read 2,365,842 times
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I'd never inflate to the maximum pressure (cold) in the Summer since that's going to rise when the tyre warms and exceed the maximum marked on the tyre.

But as a rule of thumb, I too go more on wear pattern....if they are wearing on the outer edges, then a higher pressure. If they wear in the centre, then lower pressure.
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Old 12-28-2010, 03:41 AM
 
20,329 posts, read 16,609,173 times
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I'm sure the op must have been reading tire pressure for the emergency spare tire as i've never heard of a regular passenger car requiring 60psi in the tires..
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Old 12-28-2010, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley, Az
287 posts, read 532,498 times
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I am wondering why so many of the posters ignore the RECOMMENDED tire psi and go with the MAXIMUM pressure on the tire. The car companies pay those engineers to develop those rating for a purpose.

Alot of vehicle tire labels call for the tires maximum psi (typically 35 psi), but many vehicle require less. Besides affecting tire wear patterns, overinflating a tire will affect handling, traction and ride quality.

Curly
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Old 12-28-2010, 08:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curly5759 View Post
I am wondering why so many of the posters ignore the RECOMMENDED tire psi and go with the MAXIMUM pressure on the tire. The car companies pay those engineers to develop those rating for a purpose.

Yes....they pay them to put stickers on cars which will disregard tyre wear in favour of a soft ride.
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Old 12-28-2010, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
12,871 posts, read 13,291,581 times
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I do not believe the OPs car requires 60 PSI. Pressures that high are uncommon even in trucks.

As for why tires are inflated to higher pressures than in the 70s, lets remember that it is no more than thirty years later. Tires have improved dramatically. In the early 70s radial tires may not have even been the dominant tire design (bias-ply tires were still common). Tires today are far better at everything - traction, heat resistance, wear, and fuel economy.

I think today's tires run higher pressures because they can offer high performance and fuel economy where tires before could not.
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Old 12-28-2010, 11:59 AM
 
3,073 posts, read 4,473,324 times
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Just for people that dont know this I will share it. Under inflated tires will over heat and the heat will cause the steel belts INSIDE of the tire to loosen and the tire will BLOW OUT.....this can can get you killed.
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Old 12-28-2010, 12:47 PM
 
Location: North Pole Alaska
868 posts, read 2,446,165 times
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WOW so much horrible info given here. Normally I keep my mouth shut but this is an issue that can KILL you and others on the road.

You NEVER go with what is on the tire. That is the MAX pressure for the tire. You ALWAYS go with what is on the sticker. As stated lower pressures will cause the tire to overheat and can cause failure.

Any one remember the Explorer/Firestone problem a few years ago?

If you have a tire that is not rated for the pressure rating of the vehicle then there is a 99% chance that the weight rating is not up to par as well. Both pressure and load rating go hand in hand. So there is a good chance that not only are you under inflating the tire but you could be over loading it as well.

This is one of the reasons that tire pressure sensors are required on all new vehicles sold in the U.S. after 2007. People were doing exactly what you are and killing themselves.
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Old 12-28-2010, 01:03 PM
Status: "The Union forever! Down with the traitors." (set 18 days ago)
 
13,669 posts, read 17,522,791 times
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usafracer is right. Assuming you have tires that match the OEM size and speed rating you should always follow the recommended inflation pressures for your load situation as stated on the vehicle. If for some reason the tire has a max pressure that is lower than what your vehicle calls for, than you are running the wrong type of tire. If you change tire size or speed rating significantly, than you should consult the tire manufacturer for recommended inflation pressure for your application.

In the OP's case, I think they are misreading the label on the car.
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Old 12-28-2010, 01:31 PM
 
36 posts, read 41,947 times
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Ok here is the car info...
It is an Acura MDX tire size 235/65 R 17. The tire actually says 44PSI and the door says cold tire inflation 32PSI and tire inflation pressure 60 PSI. I hope this helps because I still do not know which to follow! Please help!!!?!?!*!?
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Old 12-28-2010, 01:52 PM
 
6,348 posts, read 7,380,650 times
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Does your door sticker look like either of these? (disregard the tire sizes).
Note the 60psi is for the compact spare.
Attached Thumbnails
Tire pressure question-tire-pressure-label.jpg   Tire pressure question-tpms_sticker.jpg  
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