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Old 01-21-2011, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,870 posts, read 5,001,535 times
Reputation: 3184
Default Cold Weather, Block Heater Test

Cold Weather, Block Heater Test

temp, -23*F, engine dodge v8 360ci, heater 700w

obdtII scan tool used.

Plugged in for 1hr the coolant temp increased from
-23*F to 38*F.

At 2 hr, out side temp -22*F,engine coolant temp 51*f.

Just an fyi that just a block heater will warm your engine even in -20*F, it's going to get even colder tonight, I'm going to plug it in at 11pm them read the temp in the AM.


Two other vehicles were not plugged in.
a 98 Toyota 4runner 3.0, 196k,
started using the remote start on the first try.
temp -23*F.

08 dodge 6.7 diesel,
Used the key in the ignition, Cycled the grid heater twice and she chugged to life. temp -23*f

(All temps are without windchill as it has no effect on this experiment)


Good batteries then oil is the key to cold weather starting.
800cca is a minimum. imo

fyi
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Old 01-21-2011, 10:48 AM
 
Location: U.S.A.
2,524 posts, read 3,669,946 times
Reputation: 1534
I plug in my Cummins every night but its on a timer. I generally like to give it 2-3 hours of block heating.

Even though windchill temperature technically has no effect the wind itself certainly does. Wind passing around the vehicle/engine will increase heat transfer to the ambient. You should see different results between a garaged and non/garaged test.
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Old 01-21-2011, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,870 posts, read 5,001,535 times
Reputation: 3184
It makes no difference if it is in the wind or not.
The wind can only speed up the time it takes to drop the temp of a warm engine to the ambient temp or the temp with out the wind chill factored in.
It will not make it harder to heat up.



NWS Wind Chill Questions and Answers
2. Can wind chill impact my car's radiator or exposed water pipe?

A. The only effect wind chill has on inanimate objects, such as car radiators and water pipes, is to shorten the amount of time for the object to cool. The inanimate object will not cool below the actual air temperature. For example, if the temperature outside is -5 degrees Fahrenheit and the wind chill temperature is -31 degrees Fahrenheit, then your car's radiator will not drop lower than -5 degrees Fahrenheit.



The wind is the windchill

1. What is wind chill temperature? back

A.
The wind chill temperature is how cold people and animals feel when outside. Windchill is based on the rate of heat loss from exposed skin caused by wind and cold. As the wind increases, it draws heat from the body, driving down skin temperature and eventually the internal body temperature. Therefore, the wind makes it FEEL much colder. If the temperature is 0 degrees Fahrenheit and the wind is blowing at 15 mph, the wind chill is -19 degrees Fahrenheit. At this wind chill temperature, exposed skin can freeze in 30 minutes.
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Old 01-21-2011, 11:11 AM
 
Location: U.S.A.
2,524 posts, read 3,669,946 times
Reputation: 1534
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
It makes no difference if it is in the wind or not.
The wind can only speed up the time it takes to drop the temp of a warm engine to the ambient temp or the temp with out the wind chill factored in.
It will not make it harder to heat up.
You've reiterated what I said. Again your test results will vary. It will take LESS time for the engine to reach 38F and 51F if it is garaged.

And yes, air current will make it harder to heat up.
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Old 01-21-2011, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,870 posts, read 5,001,535 times
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I see your point.
but.
I'm not trying to warm the radiator that is way to inefficient and the passage are restricted by the thermostat and water pump.

The engine block is shielded from the wind by the body oil-pan and cylinder head from any wind.

Any diff would be just a few degrees.(in the wind or not)
but that is speculation. I'm not going to cool off my heated garage to find out.
I know, I know lol someone else can do that test.

Just an other fyi if you don't plug it in, it makes no difference if it is parked in a 50mph wind and -20*f or parked in a garage with the same temp of -20*f.
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Old 01-21-2011, 11:54 AM
 
Location: U.S.A.
2,524 posts, read 3,669,946 times
Reputation: 1534
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
Just an other fyi if you don't plug it in, it makes no difference if it is parked in a 50mph wind and -20*f or parked in a garage with the same temp of -20*f.
Yeah that is 100% correct. There is nothing working to oppose the cold, but it sure does save some energy not having to shovel snow off the vehicle.
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Old 01-21-2011, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Columbia, California
6,536 posts, read 14,478,128 times
Reputation: 4611
Are you using a freeze plug heater?
Or one of those inline hose heaters.
I believe the freeze plug replacement to be the only effective one available.
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Old 01-21-2011, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,870 posts, read 5,001,535 times
Reputation: 3184
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lux Hauler View Post
Yeah that is 100% correct. There is nothing working to oppose the cold, but it sure does save some energy not having to shovel snow off the vehicle.
I just hate digging them out of a snowdrift.

looks like Sun will be colder yet.
I'll try the diesel. see how that ones does.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ferretkona View Post
Are you using a freeze plug heater?
Or one of those inline hose heaters.
I believe the freeze plug replacement to be the only effective one available.
I agree, the frost-plug/ block heater is the way to go. Placed in the frostplug that is the closest to the oil filter is best. Mine actuality will warm up the oil filter, so the first gulp of oil will be warm. Heck you could have one on the other side of the block for over kill.
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Old 01-21-2011, 02:21 PM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
5,864 posts, read 5,789,437 times
Reputation: 6540
My Powerstroke has an oil heater and I think the engine starts a lot easier if the oil is pre heated. Of course since it's a diesel the heat takes forever.

Moving to NC from NJ also makes my truck start easier.
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Old 01-21-2011, 02:28 PM
 
Location: U.S.A.
2,524 posts, read 3,669,946 times
Reputation: 1534
How much do you guys block off your radiator/intercooler? I have mine around 85% covered, with the auxiliary heated tank it still takes a few miles to get up to temp. The Cummins cooling capacity is a bit much.
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