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Old 03-02-2011, 09:16 AM
 
1,105 posts, read 1,818,387 times
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We are looking to buy a pickup truck this spring so I've been searching the internet looking at options. One thing I'm having a hard time finding is the horsepower on the vehicles we think we'd like--I'm talking used trucks. I know the engine size and cylinders determine this, but is there an easy way to tell what the horsepower is if it's not listed.

Thanks for your time. I'm obviously new to this.
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Old 03-02-2011, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Birmingham
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Sometimes you can just type the year make and model into google along with "specifications" and you will be directed to a site that will have that information. (like internetautoguide or edmunds)

Sometimes you can look at wikipedia.org
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Old 03-02-2011, 09:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourian View Post
Sometimes you can just type the year make and model into google along with "specifications" and you will be directed to a site that will have that information. (like internetautoguide or edmunds)

Sometimes you can look at wikipedia.org
Probably the fastest and easiest way is to google it like was suggested.

Something like "2004 Ford F150 4.6 horsepower" should do it.
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Old 03-02-2011, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,226 posts, read 44,887,015 times
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Of course that's advertised horsepower - given a fairly low-traffic, level, straignt road, and a buddy with a stopwatch, and the actual weight of the vehicle (weigh it or you can go with the mfg's figures) you can do a timed say 40 to 60 roughly 3rd gear acceleration run, then time a 60 to 40 coastdown, from these actual rear wheel horsepower can be calculated.

Although - any modern pickup with even a small V-8 will almost certainly have very adequate power for whatever you want to do.

If you are thinking about towing something heavy, you probably are more interested in torque, really, and might want to think about a Diesel.
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Old 03-02-2011, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
10,900 posts, read 23,173,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
Of course that's advertised horsepower - given a fairly low-traffic, level, straignt road, and a buddy with a stopwatch, and the actual weight of the vehicle (weigh it or you can go with the mfg's figures) you can do a timed say 40 to 60 roughly 3rd gear acceleration run, then time a 60 to 40 coastdown, from these actual rear wheel horsepower can be calculated.

Although - any modern pickup with even a small V-8 will almost certainly have very adequate power for whatever you want to do.

If you are thinking about towing something heavy, you probably are more interested in torque, really, and might want to think about a Diesel.
agreed their are only two used diesels truck worth buying the 5.7 cummins Ram and the 99-03 super duty ford F250 with the 7.3 powerstroke because after 2003 ford went to the 6.0 and it was a terrible motor.
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Old 03-02-2011, 04:42 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
572 posts, read 1,407,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reebo View Post
We are looking to buy a pickup truck this spring so I've been searching the internet looking at options. One thing I'm having a hard time finding is the horsepower on the vehicles we think we'd like--I'm talking used trucks. I know the engine size and cylinders determine this, but is there an easy way to tell what the horsepower is if it's not listed.

Thanks for your time. I'm obviously new to this.
The cheapest way will be to do the google search as suggested. If you want to know the actual wheel horsepower of a particular vehicle you can take it to any automotive shop that has a dynometer. Almost all modern performance shops have them. The cost is typically about $50 and it'll measure the horsepower and torque and graph both over the engine's entire RPM range.
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Old 03-02-2011, 09:41 PM
 
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Manufacturers always measure HP at the flywheel so if Honda or any company says 250 BHP figure 15-20% less at the wheels. Like mentioned you can take any car to a Dynometer to have it measured. Torque is a very important number too if not equally as important and is what gets you moving off the line or provides for towing power. Bigger engines equal bigger torgue, diesel engines usually provide much more torque than same sized regular gas engines, and turbo/supercharging an engine will provide more torque in a given sized motor.

Another important factor is looking at when in the rpm range HP + torque is strong because everday drivig is different than racing at the track. For example some cars like the Honda Civic SI need to be run high in the rpm range to take advantage of its HP and torque.

Last edited by tripod; 03-02-2011 at 09:49 PM..
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Old 03-02-2011, 11:42 PM
 
Location: USA
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Torque X RPM / 5252

That is if you have the torque figure of course.
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Old 03-03-2011, 04:19 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
7,780 posts, read 18,448,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoomzoom3 View Post
Torque X RPM / 5252

That is if you have the torque figure of course.
on that note.. Do everyone know every internal combustion engine has equal hp and torque at 5252 rpm? its true.
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