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View Poll Results: Most improved Luxury Brand.
Cadillac 22 41.51%
Lincoln 5 9.43%
Infiniti 10 18.87%
Acura 1 1.89%
Jaguar 15 28.30%
Voters: 53. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-14-2011, 03:14 PM
 
999 posts, read 1,409,122 times
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^^^Agreed. I can understand if you don't buy a car because you don't like how it looks, drives, etc., but to blatantly not drive a car because it's American or foreign to me is really dumb. Most of those foreign cars are built in the U.S. and vice versa. The world is so globalized now that that attitude is really dumb, because you will be constantly buying products all the time that are both domestic and foreign. It just comes down as to who brings the better quality and product. This is why the American car companies suffered so much in the 1990's and 2000's. Now they are back on track and where certain brands that I would have never considered purchasing in the past like Buick or Lincoln I am definitely considering it (if I ever have the money).
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Old 03-14-2011, 03:16 PM
 
14,777 posts, read 34,827,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyWatson13 View Post
Actually what was the most significant was how Japan welcomed and followed William Demming's teachings on continuous improvement whereas American companies ignored him and shunned him. That is why Japan recovered and became such a business force so quickly after the war.

American companies continued to act like they would always have 60-70-80% market share. Ford finally invited Demming in the early 1980s but it was too late.

Now S. Korea has used these Toyota principles of Kaizen. Porsche also used the in the 1990s under the new CEO Wendeling who knew he had to eliminate waste. He credits Toyota's engineers and business model for helping save Porsche.
How ironic that Toyota itself points to diverging from the "Toyota Way" as the biggest reason for their current issues. In the chase to gain the number one spot they moved away from many of the principles they developed, especially tightly woven supply chains with single source providers.
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Old 03-14-2011, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Texas
42,461 posts, read 50,372,280 times
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Originally Posted by TheViking85 View Post

I'd also mention Aston Martin, who improved a little slower, with the DB7 and Vanquish at first, but they've gone from being the company that make cars that never work but look ok, to making cars that are drop dead gorgeous, deliver proper GT performance, whilst still being able to withstand everyday driving.
Then why are they still so slow, require someone to fly in from out of town to work on, have crappy warranties, and are still supposed to be kept low-mileage?

Sounds like a touchy garage queen to me.

Oh, and that's how the dealership described it (except for the slow part).
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Old 03-14-2011, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
14,095 posts, read 23,133,406 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourian View Post
It is ignorant, but it generally comes from people who weren't going to buy an American car any way - now they just have another snazzy quip to toss in with their hate.

Ironically, the US was instrumental in rebuilding Japan after WWII so that they could get back on their feet and start building things like Walkman, TVs, VCRs and of course cars so they could "trade" with us. I'm pretty sure our government is going to step in with aid and assistance for the current disaster to get their factories rolling again, besides the humanitarian effort it would be economic disaster to not help the world's third largest economy when it is so intertwined with our own. Our tax dollars at work. Are people with an attitude like that towards GM going to feel the same way about Japanese companies? I doubt it.
I've owned a gm since 1986 to today. I won't buy GM because of my experience with my 2003 Malibu. It's not the mechanical problems that bothered me, it was the fact that these problems existed since the first year of this model Malibu in 1997. Instead of fixing these problems as they became known or fixing at GM expense when they break, they instead denied there was a problem and didn't bother to fix anything on the models still in production because they felt these problems were not a safety issue. These problems are expensive to the vehicle owners. They include warping brake rotors, theft system not recognizing the key, leaking intake gasket thanks to gm's de cool coolant, and AC control not working (a bump in the road will turn off the compressor if you can even get it running). I'm keeping my Malibu until my wife's car is paid off and then I'm tossing the Malibu for a non-GM vehicle.
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Old 03-14-2011, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
4,464 posts, read 9,715,489 times
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Originally Posted by GLS View Post
While everyone is arguing their definition of luxury brand, most of these companies are sitting on their laurels, trying to maintain prices that don't reflect value. They better look over their shoulder toward Hyundai and the Equus, because they are going to lose market share.
To a point they already have, at least in Europe. BMW kept their prices stable, whilst reducing production cost to pay for R&D (some think also by reduction of material quality, which would be true in their base trim levels).

At the same time Toyota, Hyundai, Mazda, Honda so on and so forth have increased their experienced quality and feel, but they've also increased their prices, to the point where a comparably equipped Toyota or Honda will be within $2-3k of a similar BMW. With the BMW you do get more though, in terms of R&D, feel, driving characteristic.

Surprising as it is, a BMW 318id is one of the most economical choices you can make, at least in Norway, the 320id would be even better, but it's punished unfairly by dated HP taxes.

Yeah, it'll be 2-3, maybe 5 grand more when you buy it, but the engine is superior, same is maintenance programs and frankly, the whole buying experience.

It might not have evolved as much here in the states, but Luxury Brands or not, they'll know to adapt to the market when time comes.
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Old 03-14-2011, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Indiana
1,314 posts, read 2,594,381 times
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I voted Cadillac but its hit or miss with all of them. They all have at least one less then stellar vehicle.

I for one think you need your head examined if you pay $80,000 for a Lexus LX.
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Old 03-14-2011, 03:30 PM
 
999 posts, read 1,409,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailordave View Post
I've owned a gm since 1986 to today. I won't buy GM because of my experience with my 2003 Malibu. It's not the mechanical problems that bothered me, it was the fact that these problems existed since the first year of this model Malibu in 1997. Instead of fixing these problems as they became known or fixing at GM expense when they break, they instead denied there was a problem and didn't bother to fix anything on the models still in production because they felt these problems were not a safety issue. These problems are expensive to the vehicle owners. They include warping brake rotors, theft system not recognizing the key, leaking intake gasket thanks to gm's de cool coolant, and AC control not working (a bump in the road will turn off the compressor if you can even get it running). I'm keeping my Malibu until my wife's car is paid off and then I'm tossing the Malibu for a non-GM vehicle.
Funny, my mom actually had the same Malibu, gave her a million headaches, as soon as the car was paid off she sold it right away and went for an Japanese car. I think if you have a negative experience with a certain brand it is more than valid to not ever buy from that brand again. A car is big investment, and you better get your bang for your buck.
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Old 03-14-2011, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
4,464 posts, read 9,715,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Then why are they still so slow, require someone to fly in from out of town to work on, have crappy warranties, and are still supposed to be kept low-mileage?

Sounds like a touchy garage queen to me.

Oh, and that's how the dealership described it (except for the slow part).
Whether it's slow or not is subjective, I've passengered in a few of the older Virage models, and they seemed plenty fast for a GT of their time, I haven't been in the newer ones (other than sitting in a stationary model), but based on reviews, they seem to move sufficiently too.

It goes without saying that a low volume car maker like this doesn't have mechanics crawling out of the woodwork, they sell a fraction of the cars Ferrari does and even Ferrari aren't able to have mechanics in every city.

Warranties might be crap, I wouldn't know about that.

That said, I know of plenty V8 Vantages that are daily drivers, including Jeremy Clarksons wife, that runs without hiccup, hardly a garage queen.

Question was what car we think has improved their luxury status, and I think Aston Martin has done a tremendous, though time consuming, job getting back where they should be.
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Old 03-14-2011, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Texas
42,461 posts, read 50,372,280 times
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Originally Posted by TheViking85 View Post
That said, I know of plenty V8 Vantages that are daily drivers, including Jeremy Clarksons wife, that runs without hiccup, hardly a garage queen.

Question was what car we think has improved their luxury status, and I think Aston Martin has done a tremendous, though time consuming, job getting back where they should be.
I thought so, too...until I was in the market for one and was completely turned off by the whole disappointing experience.
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Old 03-14-2011, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
4,464 posts, read 9,715,489 times
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Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
I thought so, too...until I was in the market for one and was completely turned off by the whole disappointing experience.
To each their own.

Personally I love them, don't see that changing anytime soon. I'd argue that despite any warranty or reliability issues though, they have restored their image as a credible luxury vehicle.
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