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Old 03-21-2011, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,024 posts, read 1,896,915 times
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Or can I just bleed at that wheel? I think I know my answer, which isn't the one I'm hoping for .....
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Old 03-21-2011, 06:37 AM
 
Location: un peu près de Chicago
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I would just bleed the wheel, but I would be interested in what others think.
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Old 03-21-2011, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Hernando, FL
749 posts, read 2,016,311 times
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I would do them all and start at the furthest wheel away from the master cylinder. I usually spray some penetrating oil or WD40 on the bleeder screws the night before and then they should open up easier.

You could always just bleed the one and see what kind of pedal you have though, you might get away with just the one.
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Old 03-21-2011, 06:59 AM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,776 posts, read 14,134,753 times
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It depends on when the last time the brakes were bled. Some folks never bleed the brake system completely but I am a believer in having clean uncontaminated brake fluid.
I would say if the fluid in the Master cylinder reservoir is clean than just bleed that wheel and maybe the opposite wheel also.

Brake fluid captures moisture so it is a good idea to get rid of that moisture every year or so.

I know that is not what you want to hear but it is just just another opinion.
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Old 03-21-2011, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,024 posts, read 1,896,915 times
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Yeah just wasn't looking forward to doing all of the wheels. I'll check the brake fluid condition, bleed the wheel with the replacement caliper and see how it feels.
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Old 03-21-2011, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Pomona
1,955 posts, read 9,197,283 times
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When it's caliper replacement time, the others usually aren't far behind on maintenance (pads, grease pins, check seals, etc.) ... to spend a bit more time checking (and bleeding) those too is time well spent IMHO.
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Old 03-21-2011, 11:00 AM
 
Location: un peu près de Chicago
773 posts, read 2,001,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Narfcake View Post
When it's caliper replacement time, the others usually aren't far behind on maintenance ...
Or maybe he just broke off the bleeder screw when doing a break job.
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Old 03-21-2011, 11:32 AM
 
Location: un peu près de Chicago
773 posts, read 2,001,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDD View Post
Brake fluid captures moisture so it is a good idea to get rid of that moisture every year or so.
My Honda Accord 2005 Service Manual calls for brake fluid replacement every 3 years (Dot 3).

Steel brake lines will rust through if the fluid is not replaced.

Dot 5 brake fluid is non-hydroscopic, but it is not compatible with ABS. It is often used in antique cars and cars stored for long periods of time.
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Old 03-21-2011, 11:55 AM
 
6,368 posts, read 13,342,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zea mays View Post
My Honda Accord 2005 Service Manual calls for brake fluid replacement every 3 years (Dot 3).

Steel brake lines will rust through if the fluid is not replaced.

Dot 5 brake fluid is non-hydroscopic, but it is not compatible with ABS. It is often used in antique cars and cars stored for long periods of time.
Don't you mean non-hygroscopic?
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Old 03-21-2011, 12:16 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
7,780 posts, read 17,779,267 times
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bleed em all..
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