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Old 11-06-2011, 05:25 PM
 
1,109 posts, read 2,261,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Uh huh... and?
I actually didn't read the whole post. Just had a nap
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Old 11-06-2011, 05:40 PM
 
Location: SWUS
5,414 posts, read 7,628,292 times
Reputation: 5781
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Because you can't drink your coffee and talk on the phone while you are shifting.
That's what YOU think
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Old 11-06-2011, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,174 posts, read 27,435,915 times
Reputation: 11838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
They still do with the autoboxes... not sure what your point is.



Today's autos will do that too.

Ten years ago, autos did get worse mileage. These days, it's more even with a slight nod to autos, especially those horrible CVTs. I still prefer a manual for the driver involvement and because I'm cheap.
I was not speaking of downshifting, but short-shifting to save fuel. I have no idea how one can short-shift with an automatic transmission since it's the computer working with the transmission/motor RPM that move the transmission from the low gears to the higher ones.

Yes, most transmissions of today are quite good. But as I mentioned before (2009 Ferester auto/manual), the automatic one has 4 gears and the manual has five. Driving the manual one I would still save a little fuel over the auto.

Also, look at the fuel usage charts for the same automobiles, but one with a manual transmission and the other with an automatic transmission. And finally, one best better acceleration from a manual transmission that automatic ones. That's the way it is, unless clutch slippage can be reduced in automatic transmissions.

How to save fuel with a manual transmission:
http://www.mpgenhance.com/manual_transmission.html

That said, I drive both although I leaned to drive manual back in the '70s, and thats's the one I prefer. Now the automatic transmission of my wife's Rav 4 V6 has 5 gears, and it's a rocket Cruising at 70 MPH the tachometer's pointer is just a tad short of 2,000 RPM. This helps quite a lot with fuel usage. Now, if it were manual, I could shift to 5th gear when cruising around 40 MPH since the V6 has plenty of power.

Last edited by RayinAK; 11-06-2011 at 06:53 PM..
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Old 11-06-2011, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Scranton
1,384 posts, read 2,614,975 times
Reputation: 1639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleet View Post
I'm not referring to the trucking industry; I am referring to the general public. What I posted is accurate... before automatic transmissions were common, most Americans knew how to drive a car with a manual.... they had to, if they wanted to drive!

"Most people I know." How many people, out of the 310 million in country, do you know personally? And do you have any statistics showing how many Americans know how to drive a stickshift-equipped car?
If fewer people in the trucking industry know how to drive stick, even though you have to at least know the theory behind shifting in order to get a CDL, what makes you think that a higher percentage of the general public will know how to do it, when they aren't even required to know what that third pedal on the floor does?

One Lesson From The Toyota Flap: Americans Can
Quote:
There's no requirement that drivers understand how their cars function, and we do seem to be slipping down the scale of automotive literacy. The majority of Americans can no longer drive a car with a manual transmission, which is why only about 7 percent of new cars have them. (Even some so-called automotive journalists can't drive a manual!)
Americans Shifting Gears in Smaller Numbers : NPR
Quote:
There's also been a startling erosion in Americans' driving know-how. Mr. GARFIELD: I know my kids have never learned how to drive a manual transmission. If they sat in the car with a manual, they wouldn't know what to do with it.
HORSLEY: Indeed, United Driving School in San Diego no longer even offers lessons in driving a stick shift because so few students are interested.
Check The Manual (Transmission): Stick Shift Cars Going Away
Quote:
Now we come to the year 2010. The ability to drive a car equipped with a manual transmission is becoming a dying art. The sales numbers tell the story: In 1985, according to Wardís Communications, 22.4% of all vehicles sold in the United States came with a manual transmission. By 2007, the number had plummeted to 7.7%.
A quick check of vehicles for sale on AOL Autos tells a similar story. Of the 4,391,747 vehicles recently listed for sale, only 241,560 -- or 5.5% -- came with a manual.
The reasons for this situation are many. First, driverís education classes simply arenít teaching students how to drive a manual. We spoke with Eric Tunell at the Bob Bondurant School of High Performance Driving, perhaps the most well-known and highly regarded performance driving schools in the country, to get his perspective.
ďWith the teen drivers who attend our programs, their family car doesnít have a manual transmission, so they donít need to learn,Ē he explained.
Now, how many people do YOU know than can drive a manual?
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Old 11-06-2011, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
22,151 posts, read 26,616,225 times
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Trucker, I didn't claim that more of general public know how to drive a stick-shift. Even with those links you posted, I don't see any that show data of how many Americans know how to drive a car with a manual transmission. Probably because there is no such data I am aware of. The links you posted show that less cars being sold are equipped with a manual trans but I already knew that.

I know several people who know how to drive a stick. Also, at the weekly car show I stop by, I notice that quite a few of the classic muscle cars have a manual transmission. There are still fans of cars with manual transmissions. Which is fine... take your choice... manual or automatic.
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Old 11-06-2011, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,174 posts, read 27,435,915 times
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In reality, the most powerful automobiles around the world are offered with manual transmissions. The reason for this is the rapid acceleration that manual transmissions/motor provide. But I agree with a lot of you who have said that new generations of Americans just don't know how to drive stick. My wife, my two sons, and one of my two daughters can drive stick, but this is not the norm these days.

A lot of the automobile companies still build cars with manual transmissions, but these aren't as numerous as years ago:
Manual Transmission Vehicles: The Ultimate List - Motor Trend
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Old 11-07-2011, 02:01 AM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
22,151 posts, read 26,616,225 times
Reputation: 6441
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
In reality, the most powerful automobiles around the world are offered with manual transmissions. The reason for this is the rapid acceleration that manual transmissions/motor provide. But I agree with a lot of you who have said that new generations of Americans just don't know how to drive stick. My wife, my two sons, and one of my two daughters can drive stick, but this is not the norm these days.

A lot of the automobile companies still build cars with manual transmissions, but these aren't as numerous as years ago:
Manual Transmission Vehicles: The Ultimate List - Motor Trend
Wait a minute... there are definitely cars out there (new and old) with automatic transmissions (and powerful engines) which provide rapid acceleration.

In fact, I was just reading an article in a muscle car magazine about a 1969 Dodge Super Bee with a modified 440-6 Pack engine, 4.10 gears and automatic transmission. It runs an 11.84 sec @ 114 mph 1/4 mile on street tires.
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Old 11-07-2011, 06:01 AM
 
Location: USA - midwest
5,945 posts, read 4,714,576 times
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Default update...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleet View Post
Correction: Most Americans prefer not to drive them. Before automatic transmissions were common, Americans were driving cars with manual transmissions. My mom used to drive a 1951 Plymouth with a manual trans.
My mom used to drive a 1963 Fairlane with a manual transmission. That was 40 years ago. My folks got a Ford with an automatic in 1970. They haven't owned a manual trans vehicle since.

Your "correction" was accurate in our mothers' time. I doubt that it still holds true. Most current drivers probably have little or no experience with a manual transmission. The number of passenger car models currently produced that are even available with a manual transmission is dwindling.

These days, I'd almost consider a manual trans as a theft deterrent.
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Old 11-07-2011, 06:15 AM
 
Location: SW MO
656 posts, read 955,114 times
Reputation: 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleet View Post
Wait a minute... there are definitely cars out there (new and old) with automatic transmissions (and powerful engines) which provide rapid acceleration.

In fact, I was just reading an article in a muscle car magazine about a 1969 Dodge Super Bee with a modified 440-6 Pack engine, 4.10 gears and automatic transmission. It runs an 11.84 sec @ 114 mph 1/4 mile on street tires.
Drag cars almost always have automatics because it leads to a more predictable reaction time -> launch, which can lower the ET ever so slightly and lessen the number of false starts.
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Old 11-07-2011, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Pikesville, MD
5,229 posts, read 11,487,380 times
Reputation: 4846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyover_Country View Post
Drag cars almost always have automatics because it leads to a more predictable reaction time -> launch, which can lower the ET ever so slightly and lessen the number of false starts.
And there are no missed shifts AND the torquermultiplication of the torque converter makes launches much faster. Also there is no time wasted DURING the shift, allowing the engine to maintain HP (or if it's a turbo car, to maintain boost) DURING the shift.

Automatics are VERY good for accelleration when buiult up slightly and matched to the engine's output.

Small engine cars don't do well with automatics unless they are turbocharged. Big engine cars can be quicker with automatics than with manuals.
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