U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Unread 11-07-2011, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
9,517 posts, read 11,470,991 times
Reputation: 10897
I prefer a stick. What I am noticing is that more brands are selling cars with 6 speed manuel transmissions. I like it because the stick is so much more fun than an automatic. I noticed that the Hyundai Accent comes with a 6 speed manuel or you can opt for the 6 speed automatic at $1,500 more and that is an economy car. Nissan also has many models that come with the 6 speed manuel. People like them because they are fun to drive. My former GMC had a 3 speed colume shift manuel transmission and I loved driving that guy. Lots of fun. Still I like a car with a lot of gears and more controll on what I get to do while I drive. Wouldn't be much fun to drive in a Ferrari with an automatic. Now many of those shift with paddles on the steering collume, and I think that the Mitsubishi brand has a few paddle shift cars as well. That is a more efficient use of shifting as your hands are on the wheel. Saying all that I like the Ferrari gate shifters. Looks cool. I may not own one but three of my friends have them.

Saying all of that, the automatic transmission has evolved to the point that it is an efficient machine. As others have said many have 7, 8, or more gears. I would say with the use of computers monitoring the shifting the units have become more efficient. Still, I don't see it as any fun. Some brands have realized this and have included a feature that allows the driver to control the shifting. I have not driven a car like that as of yet but have only read about it. Maybe someone can mention what it is like to drive that kind of set up.

I don't see having a stick as being hard to manuever within the city. I drive in LA from time to time and have never had a problem. With a small car such as a Porsche or Hyundai which we own both I have yet to have a problem shifting on hills or in traffic. I could see a potential problem with a big old boat from the 50's, 60's, or 70's, but not with todays smaller lighter cars. I remember years ago driving a Ford F350 towing a boat on a hill at a light while trying to turn. Now that is a challenge, especially if you were like me, 18 at the time and not experienced with that sort of driving. Smaller cars though just don't have the weight problems, have shorter distance at the clutch when pushed in, and can take off quicker when asked to move.
Quick reply to this message

 
Unread 11-07-2011, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
9,517 posts, read 11,470,991 times
Reputation: 10897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merc63 View Post
And there are no missed shifts AND the torquermultiplication of the torque converter makes launches much faster. Also there is no time wasted DURING the shift, allowing the engine to maintain HP (or if it's a turbo car, to maintain boost) DURING the shift.

Automatics are VERY good for accelleration when buiult up slightly and matched to the engine's output.

Small engine cars don't do well with automatics unless they are turbocharged. Big engine cars can be quicker with automatics than with manuals.
I agree to this. With a dragster it is all about the engine. You don't have the time to shift gears.
Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 11-07-2011, 10:30 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
3,490 posts, read 1,689,097 times
Reputation: 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by wade52 View Post
My mom used to drive a 1963 Fairlane with a manual transmission. That was 40 years ago. My folks got a Ford with an automatic in 1970. They haven't owned a manual trans vehicle since.

Your "correction" was accurate in our mothers' time. I doubt that it still holds true. Most current drivers probably have little or no experience with a manual transmission. The number of passenger car models currently produced that are even available with a manual transmission is dwindling.

These days, I'd almost consider a manual trans as a theft deterrent.
What a coincidence....I bought a used 1963 Fairlane with a stick in early 1970. That wasn't, by chance, in Omaha was it?

I would agree that most current drivers have little to no experience with a stick....by choice.
Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 11-07-2011, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Pikesville, MD
3,828 posts, read 3,988,681 times
Reputation: 3025
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
I was not speaking of downshifting, but short-shifting to save fuel. I have no idea how one can short-shift with an automatic transmission since it's the computer working with the transmission/motor RPM that move the transmission from the low gears to the higher ones.
Simple, us less throttle pedal. If you don't give it as much gas, it shifts at a lower rpm than if you hold the throttle farther down. So, it automatically short shifts. At least all the ones I've driven do, whether they were computer controlled or vacuum controled (from the 50s to the 80s).

On my BMW, if you want it to hold the shifts longer, you put it in sport mode. If you want it to short shift for economy and smoothness, you leave it in standard mode. You can also shift manually up or down, though it's not as good at that as a built up/modded domestic automatic from the '60s and '70s would be. My AOD automatic behind the 5.0 in my Mazda RX7 autocross car woudl shift automatically if I let it, but shifted manually when I moved the lever, instantly, up or downshifting. That's becaeu liek most domestic autoboxes, you can buy a $50 shift kit that changes the valving and pressures inside the trans to make it shift differently. That AOD also got performance clutch packs internally as well as a different torque converter for improved lockup at speed, with a higher stall speed for better acceleration. Made the car much quicker and more responsive than if it had a manual transmission. While I prefer a good manual in a small engine car or a street car, a good automatic in the right car is the right tool for the job, too. That V8 RX7 would have been worse with a manual, and there would be no advantage in putting a manual in my BMW 7 series (other than uniqueness).
Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 11-07-2011, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Back in the gym...Yo Adrian!
8,665 posts, read 9,677,615 times
Reputation: 15872
I just like to have one hand free so I can text while driving. j/k

Actually, I do like having a free hand just for something as simple as taking a sip of coffee or whatever. Sometimes manual transmission is fun to drive, but not so much in stop and go city traffic.
Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 11-07-2011, 04:09 PM
 
Location: USA - midwest
5,670 posts, read 2,302,856 times
Reputation: 2415
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
What a coincidence....I bought a used 1963 Fairlane with a stick in early 1970. That wasn't, by chance, in Omaha was it?
It was in the midwest, but hundreds of miles from Omaha. It was a yellow "Ranch Wagon" with a 6 cyl engine.

Quote:
I would agree that most current drivers have little to no experience with a stick....by choice.
Especially younger drivers.
Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 11-07-2011, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Back in the sticks
515 posts, read 302,338 times
Reputation: 496
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post

I would agree that most current drivers have little to no experience with a stick....by choice.
I would choose a stick, but they are pretty much unavailable in anything except an econobox or a sports car. I drive practical cars like SUVs and pickups, and sticks are generally not even available as an option if you custom order.
Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 11-07-2011, 04:36 PM
 
Location: San Diego
16,104 posts, read 11,413,910 times
Reputation: 5426
I can't imagine rowing an F-350 in dead stop traffic for an hour at a time. My left leg would look like Earl Campbells.
Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 11-07-2011, 04:50 PM
 
1,109 posts, read 985,426 times
Reputation: 395
An automatic seems more appropriate in anything like dragsters, most SUVs or luxury cars bigger than a 5 series. There should always be an option for manuals for anything smaller than a 5 series. Small cars are not that great with an auto from my experience. This is just my input.
Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 11-07-2011, 05:37 PM
 
3,130 posts, read 2,538,600 times
Reputation: 1512
Funny..
BMW wants to cancel manuals here but Americans keep buying them. Americans were the ones why there is a M5 manual, BMW does not want it.

Now Audi has revealed their S4/S5 in Europe won't have a manual but the American market will
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $74,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top