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Old 08-31-2012, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Wichita Falls Texas
999 posts, read 1,323,320 times
Reputation: 968

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdlife619 View Post
The full size Fords, Mercury and the gigantic Lincolns were highly popular, well constructed cars in those days, ( at a time when Detroit was building it's worst vehicles in history), even better than GM's Cadillac and Buick during the middle to later half of the 70's. Typically Lincolns had the softest ride, but the worst performance.
Yup, the Mercury Grand Marquis had the lowest frequency of repair record of any domestic car built between 1973 and 1976. I have a 76 Grand Marquis and a 79 Lincoln. Even now 36 and 33 years after they were built they are highly reliable and I trust them to take me anywhere. Another interesting note is that the Ford Maverick/Mercury Comet had the lowest frequency of repair record of all domestic cars from intro in April 1969 thru 1972. They had a very basic and simplistic design on their side though.
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Old 08-31-2012, 11:14 AM
 
14,752 posts, read 27,513,384 times
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We've never owned the "high line" brands.

However, all of our/my Buick and Oldsmobile products were satisfyingly smooth ... and reliable.
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Old 08-31-2012, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
888 posts, read 1,676,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by straight shooter View Post
How was it when it came to reliability and cost on maintenance and repairs? I have always loved the classic jaguar styling but have been concerned with its reliability and electrics.
As close to perfect as any car can be. I owned it for 4 years, put 30K miles on it and it only visited the dealer 4 times, once for a recall/TSB on the transmission controller, once for a new fuel pump (under warranty) and twice for scheduled service. Bear in mind this was an '04 so not exactly a classic at that point. The electrics is an old wifes tales based on the Lucas electrical gremlins that haunted 70's and 80's Jaguars. Hasn't been an issue for more than 20 years.
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Old 09-02-2012, 01:41 AM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
22,151 posts, read 26,606,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdlife619 View Post
I get tired of hearing all the American luxury car bashing going on on this forum. Some people still love the old classics, the smooth floaty boulevard cruisers and there's nothing wrong with that. They provide the best isolation and comfortable ride than any European car could dream of doing if were talking about "real" comfort now. Seats, legroom play a big role into comfort, and only the luxury cars of the 70's and 80's had the softest seats and the biggest amount of legroom that is sorely missing in today's luxury cars. They all feel like your sitting on a cement bench for crying out loud. no thank you!

Some people might not like the bad handling and extra softness of the American full sizers of the past, but since we talking about the "Smoothest" riding cars in a sense, well the old Cadillac's, Buicks, Lincoln's and Imperial's tanks of the past where best at providing just that.

Brand spanking new cars obviously are smooth and comfortable no doubt, but they are all still a little too firm for many people. I've driven a new Hyundai Sonata (Very nice car BTW) and although it was nice, quiet and smooth riding, if I ever had to take a long trip somewhere, I'd prefer to be in a classic land yacht with velour seats hands down.

What gives the extra comfort of a car in many respects is the wheelbase. The bigger the better at keeping road imperfections felt inside the cabin to a minimum. So if anything if we are asking ourselves what new cars have the smoothest ride? I'd look at the Lexus LS460 and the BMW 7 Series extra wheelbase edition. Lincoln doesn't have the Town Car anymore, and Cadillac dumped the DTS, so they're really isn't any other American luxury car today that can be claimed as being full size American comfort anymore. That title belongs to the imports now. Cadillac is pretty much chasing after BMW and wants to become like BMW in the way there cars drive, handle etc.., Lincoln is confused and stuck somewhere in the middle, do they want to be entry level luxury cars, or true luxury? Who knows, but since the Town Car is gone, there sales have been hurting. Personally, it's not always a good thing trying to copy your competitors because it can come off as being desperate.

Lincoln has always been known as that conservative traditional American luxury car company, and there is nothing wrong with that. Consumers don't take Lincoln seriously at all, Cadillac has them beat in just about every category, from exterior styling, to engine performance and a a loyal long lasting fan base.

Lincoln is confused, I know they are trying hard to be different and competitive in it's market, but honestly they simply cannot compete or beat the European's and Japanese automakers at there own game. So I say, because there image is what it is, "Old Mannish", they need to stick with that theme and move on. Lincoln could become the American Rolls Royce on the cheap, charge $120,000-200,000 for a car, people will buy them if the styling and build quality is exceptional.

Moving into a smaller market for them would be better off for the brand. I think people with a ton of money to spend will take Lincoln more serious if they decided to take the Rolls Royce approach.
Good post. You saved me the trouble of saying what would have been essentially the same thing.

The full-sized (actual full-sized), luxury U.S. cars of the '60s and '70s had a very smooth ride. It differed, of course, between makes and even models. But, for me, "smooth ride" means you don't feel the bumps in the road. And the above cars were very good at isolating the occupants from road irregularities. Yes, some did float or rebound over a hump or dip but you still didn't feel the roughness or harsness. These days, a "smooth" ride is actually on the firm side, which I don't care for.

My pick, as I posted earlier, for the smoothest ride is the magnificent Cadillac Fleetwood Seventy-Five 9-passenger Sedan and Limousine, before they were downsized in 1977. With their very long wheelbase, heavy weight and soft (but not bouncy) suspension, they provided a fantastic ride, especially in the rear compartment.

Here are some photos of these elegant cars for those who enjoy such automobiles. All are the limousine model.
From top to bottom, a 1976 (two photos; the same year as my limousine), a 1971, a 1973 (with the optional landau roof) and a 1969 (also with an optional landau roof).









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Old 09-02-2012, 04:54 AM
 
Location: San Diego A.K.A "D.A.Y.G.O City"
1,891 posts, read 3,453,644 times
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Hey thanks Fleet! Me and you think alike I forgot to mention the 60's luxury rides, because they should also be included, but from an all out, "Sink in your seat" Lazy Boy comfort, the 70's provided an edge on supreme ride smoothness with there extra size, longer wheelbase, super soft seats, and added weight.

I forgot about those Fleetwoods in the 70's, they were massive! I always wondered how in the hell people were able to park these cars in their garages or driveways without having major fitting issues? Also the elderly, how in the heck were they able to open the heavy doors and literally just be able to see over the steering wheel alone! I owned a 72 Caddy Deville which is a few inches shorter than the Fleetwood. It was a good car that drove really well, but sadly the interior was very cheap and it rattled like crazy when going over bumps and irregular street surfaces. I like the Lincolns a little bit more for extra quietness and smoother ride over the Cad's of the same years, but in some respects, the Cadillac's just had a sleeker more sexier profile than Lincoln, since Lincoln during the 70's were very square, boxy cars, but I love both brand of cars though.

See the people here that have never driven one of these cars before, don't understand the love affair you will immediately get after taking one of these kinds of cars for a cruise. But to drive something so big, takes a lot of patience, and willful urge just to take it slow every once in awhile to enjoy the comfort in life that you'll experience while in a older luxury classic.

I know a guy that owns a older Camaro for his "Need for Speed" days, and a 74 Buick Electra for his relaxing days. He has the best of both worlds.
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Old 09-07-2012, 03:27 AM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
22,151 posts, read 26,606,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdlife619 View Post
Hey thanks Fleet! Me and you think alike I forgot to mention the 60's luxury rides, because they should also be included, but from an all out, "Sink in your seat" Lazy Boy comfort, the 70's provided an edge on supreme ride smoothness with there extra size, longer wheelbase, super soft seats, and added weight.
Yes, there are those (such as us) who appreciate true comfort along with luxury.

Quote:
I forgot about those Fleetwoods in the 70's, they were massive! I always wondered how in the hell people were able to park these cars in their garages or driveways without having major fitting issues? Also the elderly, how in the heck were they able to open the heavy doors and literally just be able to see over the steering wheel alone! I owned a 72 Caddy Deville which is a few inches shorter than the Fleetwood. It was a good car that drove really well, but sadly the interior was very cheap and it rattled like crazy when going over bumps and irregular street surfaces. I like the Lincolns a little bit more for extra quietness and smoother ride over the Cad's of the same years, but in some respects, the Cadillac's just had a sleeker more sexier profile than Lincoln, since Lincoln during the 70's were very square, boxy cars, but I love both brand of cars though.
Well, my garage is 22 feet long (a 1960s house). Enough room, even for my '76 limousine. Of course, some garages are shorter. I guess, in that case, they were/are parked in the driveway.

My mom is just under 5' and drove a '60, '69, '70 and '74 Cadillac, all Coupe de Villes. Never had to use a pillow to sit higher... the seats were adjustable up and down as well as forward and back. And the seats were mounted relatively high to begin with. The doors are heavy, that's true, but that wouldn't keep her from driving a Cadillac!

Yes, a '72 Cadillac didn't have quite the build quality as a '70 and earlier. But the engine and drivetrain were fine.

Quote:
See the people here that have never driven one of these cars before, don't understand the love affair you will immediately get after taking one of these kinds of cars for a cruise. But to drive something so big, takes a lot of patience, and willful urge just to take it slow every once in awhile to enjoy the comfort in life that you'll experience while in a older luxury classic.
Right, how many people under 30 years old have actually driven or even rode in something like a '75 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham or a '77 Lincoln Continental? In many cases, they have no guideline to go by regarding a boulevard ride, which the '60s and '70s Cadillac, Lincoln and Imperials were famous for. I drove a co-worker years ago in my '71 Fleetwood Brougham. She pretty much thought that a Cadillac of that era was like other cars, just bigger. But when I was driving on the freeway and there was no bounce or harshness when going over broken or bumpy pavement, she said "This thing rides nice."


Quote:
I know a guy that owns a older Camaro for his "Need for Speed" days, and a 74 Buick Electra for his relaxing days. He has the best of both worlds.
I know what he means. Although I also like '60s/early '70s muscle cars, sometimes it's very relaxing to just go for a nice, leisurely ride in one of the above cars.
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Old 11-04-2012, 10:25 AM
 
Location: South Park Charlotte, NC
11 posts, read 24,066 times
Reputation: 10
Own a limo service. The Lincoln Town Car from 2003 thru the last year (2011) has a terrific ride due to its air bag/spring suspension which automatically compensates for load. The L (livery) version beats the regular Town Car because it adds 6 inches of length to the wheelbase.

After buying my 1st L version in 2004, had a CEO arrive in Charlotte from LGA. After less than 10 minutes in the car, he asked what was different about the car. I asked what he meant and his response was, "I just got out of a Town Car in NYC, it wasn't as nice a ride as this, what's different?" We concurred the extra length provided an even better ride.
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Old 07-14-2013, 10:21 PM
 
2 posts, read 9,891 times
Reputation: 11
I have an 03 deville and my wife has a 10 Lincoln MKX. My Caddy had a better ride, but the new smaller cads seem to all have sports suspention which is very bumpy compared to my 03 larger frame Caddy. I would like to find a cheaper Lincoln with Caddy smooth ride. Is this possible to get better tires to make ride smoother? Or best or better suspention into a Lincoln? Wanting the best for the least,I know I'm a dreamer!!!I am looking for a 4 door not a limo type. Everyone is talking here about their older cars but I am 70 and I do not want any kind of smaller,sports anything. I like a no bumps ride, and I hope SOMEONE COMES OUT WITH A smooth riding say30+miles per gal.;2014 or later model for us who need the comfort....

Last edited by dreamerNeil; 07-14-2013 at 10:30 PM.. Reason: Just wish to add road conditions is also a driving problem
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Old 07-14-2013, 10:32 PM
 
2 posts, read 9,891 times
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As you all know the roads everywhere are in need of repair and thus causing all of us to wear out our tires and suspentions and with worsening economies, roads are not being kept up as often as they need to be thus we all need better proforming cars.
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Old 07-15-2013, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Prosper
6,268 posts, read 12,101,075 times
Reputation: 9325
My mothers 2009 Mercedes S550 is the smoothest riding car I've ever been in. The suspension on that car is amazing, and I'm not a huge fan of Mercedes and generally advise against buying one, but I'll give them credit in this area.

You can travel over some serious bumps and dips and not feel a thing, the car stays planted and level. But, hit the gas and it transforms into a very firm, sporty suspension with great handling. Most cars are good at one or the other, but almost never both.
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