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Old 09-19-2012, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 12,505,578 times
Reputation: 3540

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They say that because they don't know how or what on the vehicle is damaged.
If the vehicle has a damaged drive line or steering components you wouldn't want to flat tow it home as it could further damage the vehicle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trucker7 View Post
One thing that has me scratching my head now is, why does it make a difference, from the vehicle point of view, whether you're towing a disabled vehicle vs. a recreational tow. The only thing that I can think of, is that they're trying to cover their behind in case the breakdown is tranny/transfer case related.
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Old 09-19-2012, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,505 posts, read 49,557,510 times
Reputation: 24548
If I ever get around to building a kit car I will look for a transmission that can either be a six speed manual with a stick or some form of automatic I can shift with paddles behind the steeering wheel. In either case the driveline will be solidly connected in top gear.

I had an old Reodmaster Wagon that would launch in a most amazing way. Just leave it in drive, slowly open the throttle with the brakes on until it downshifed then let go of the brakes just as the kight went green and swiftly depress the gas. That thing would smoke the tires for about 15 ft then hook up and go. A lot of rice rocketeers have had a good view of the ass end of a Buick Wagon.
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Old 09-19-2012, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Funkotron, MA
1,204 posts, read 2,905,320 times
Reputation: 1793
To add to the overall debate - I greatly prefer manual transmissions over autos. Why? It's fun. We can argue technical stuff all day, but I enjoy driving and like the feel and control (even if it's just perceived) that comes with a manual.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Veyron View Post
Thats not true engine braking my friend.

Only manuals can truly engine brake. As soon as you downshift you can slowly let your foot off the clutch for slow braking or you can rapidly let your foot off the clutch for fast engine braking.

Which is part of the increased control advantage manual has.

It's like the reverse of a brake pedal.
I'd have to disagree with your definition of engine braking.

Engine braking is leaving the car in a lower gear without giving it gas. The drag from internal friction as well as compressing the air in the cylinders slows the car down (or at least prevents it from going much faster).

What you're describing is slowing the car down with the clutch. It is using engine braking, but that's not the traditional definition of it. I wouldn't call this an advantage as it wears the clutch down and if you're shifting into a lower gear without rev-matching you're also wearing the synchos a little bit. Plus you can engine brake with an auto.
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Old 09-19-2012, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,269 posts, read 12,481,303 times
Reputation: 13422
Quote:
Originally Posted by raveabouttoast View Post
Plus you can engine brake with an auto.

Agreed. That's specifically why you have a selection of gears in an automatic, decending steep grades....and towing, among other things. Just with new cars, you have to wait until the computer decides what's slow enough to actually change gears.

That's another plus for standard!
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Old 09-20-2012, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 12,505,578 times
Reputation: 3540
So over reeving a engine because you down shifted is an advantage?
when I down shift my autos it will let me reach the red line then it defules.

Technically your compression breaking not engine braking .
Gassers be they manual or automatic transmissions don't have engine brakes diesels do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnatomicflux View Post
Agreed. That's specifically why you have a selection of gears in an automatic, decending steep grades....and towing, among other things. Just with new cars, you have to wait until the computer decides what's slow enough to actually change gears.

That's another plus for standard!
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Old 09-20-2012, 02:48 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
17,488 posts, read 18,642,976 times
Reputation: 47039
Well, diesel Jake Brakes just use compression another way.

Jacobs Vehicle Systems | Compression Release Brake
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Old 09-21-2012, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,269 posts, read 12,481,303 times
Reputation: 13422
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
So over reeving a engine because you down shifted is an advantage?
when I down shift my autos it will let me reach the red line then it defules.

.
I'm not over revving my engine. I rev match and do it at speeds that are appropriate. It's not like I'm dropping it into second gear at 60.
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Old 03-07-2013, 04:43 AM
 
1 posts, read 934 times
Reputation: 10
"And you have the physical strength to do that?"
I usually did have the strength to do it. However, my '70 VW Bus (one of the great vehicles of all time) didn't need it. If I parked with my right two wheels on a curb, it would jump start by just rolling off the curb.

p.s. I wish such a vehicle could be purchased new today. I would like a 1986 Mazda extended cab B200 added to my wish list.
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:05 AM
 
Location: anywhere but Seattle
1,082 posts, read 1,800,489 times
Reputation: 975
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
Why a stick shift?
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Old 03-07-2013, 06:08 AM
 
5,666 posts, read 4,212,116 times
Reputation: 5608
All the cars i've ever owned have been stick shift with two exceptions, one a 5-speed manual column shift and the other a 6-speed shiftable automatic via a gearstick (or it can be left as a full auto if you wish).

Most, if not all, of those in the future will be stick-shift too. It's what i've driven since I passed my test and what the large majority of those I see for sale both new and secondhand have fitted.
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