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Old 04-09-2011, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
513 posts, read 950,390 times
Reputation: 274

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I didn't mention I am not a contractor for living, but I often do remodeling on my house and bring furniture and stuff from Chicago to ND. I guess 1/2 ton pickup with 8' bed would be best for me, wondering now if I need ext cab, probably not... I'm looking at S-10 and F-series pickups on Wikipedia and it turns out that there is so much mess in these models that it's hard to figure out what to eat with what. Can anybody say how many drywall sheets would I be able to load on a 1/2-ton truck not to overload suspension?
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Old 04-09-2011, 03:00 PM
 
52 posts, read 48,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moskiter View Post
I didn't mention I am not a contractor for living, but I often do remodeling on my house and bring furniture and stuff from Chicago to ND. I guess 1/2 ton pickup with 8' bed would be best for me, wondering now if I need ext cab, probably not... I'm looking at S-10 and F-series pickups on Wikipedia and it turns out that there is so much mess in these models that it's hard to figure out what to eat with what. Can anybody say how many drywall sheets would I be able to load on a 1/2-ton truck not to overload suspension?
15 or so. It depends on the truck, tires, and how much other weight you're carrying.

If you already have a decent vehicle for towing, buying an enclosed trailer can be a better choice than buying a truck. Trailers seem to hold their value forever, don't require nearly as much maintenance, are cheaper to license, don't require insurance, allow you to leave your load protected at the jobsite, etc.
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Old 04-09-2011, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
513 posts, read 950,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missed View Post
15 or so. It depends on the truck, tires, and how much other weight you're carrying.

If you already have a decent vehicle for towing, buying an enclosed trailer can be a better choice than buying a truck. Trailers seem to hold their value forever, don't require nearly as much maintenance, are cheaper to license, don't require insurance, allow you to leave your load protected at the jobsite, etc.
Thanks!

That's a good and cheap option but my passanger car is even too weak for North Dakota's winters and lots of snow, that's why I want something that gives me confidence so I wouldn't have to worry about getting stuck on some ghost road in winter.

Do all pickups have wheel wells sticking out into their beds? If so, a bed must be wider than 4' to fit sheets..
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Old 04-09-2011, 04:59 PM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,776 posts, read 14,134,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moskiter View Post
I didn't mention I am not a contractor for living, but I often do remodeling on my house and bring furniture and stuff from Chicago to ND. I guess 1/2 ton pickup with 8' bed would be best for me, wondering now if I need ext cab, probably not... I'm looking at S-10 and F-series pickups on Wikipedia and it turns out that there is so much mess in these models that it's hard to figure out what to eat with what. Can anybody say how many drywall sheets would I be able to load on a 1/2-ton truck not to overload suspension?
Extended cabs are nice because once you get the bed filled up you still have room behind the front seat for more stuff.

I have the perfect truck for you too bad I am not ready to sell just yet.

95 Ford F 250 4x4 diesel 8' bed with contractor cap and only 115K miles.
If you can wait till next year it will be up for sale.
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Old 04-09-2011, 05:37 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
17,481 posts, read 18,634,440 times
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Weight of drywall according to sheet size an thickness.

Answers.com - What is the weight of one sheet of drywall 4'x8'x12

Pickup bed sizes.

Pickup truck - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Your mileage will vary. I would choose a minimum of 1/2 ton and preferably a 3/4 ton.

Skip the mini trucks.
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Old 04-09-2011, 05:57 PM
 
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Unless it for your work have the sheetrock delievered and they will unload it which if many sheets is a job for two men.
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Old 04-09-2011, 08:20 PM
 
52 posts, read 48,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moskiter View Post
Thanks!

That's a good and cheap option but my passanger car is even too weak for North Dakota's winters and lots of snow, that's why I want something that gives me confidence so I wouldn't have to worry about getting stuck on some ghost road in winter.

Do all pickups have wheel wells sticking out into their beds? If so, a bed must be wider than 4' to fit sheets..
Another option would be to buy a small SUV and a trailer. If you're looking for a winter vehicle, pickups aren't always the best choice because they tend to have very little weight over the rear tires which makes them terrible to drive on snow until you put it in 4wd.

Something along the lines of a Jeep Cherokee with the inline 6 would be a good all-around vehicle for what you. They make great winter beaters, run practically forever, and have plenty of power to pull a trailer loaded up with 15-20 sheets of drywall.

Unless you NEED a diesel, don't get one for a winter driver in ND....especially a Ford 6.0L. Diesels take forever to warm up, and just don't work well in that kind of weather unless they're being worked hard, which you won't be doing. Since they're even more nose heavy than gas pickups, they're also worse in the snow than gas trucks.

Extended cab longbeds are also worse in the snow than regular cab trucks and can be hard to park...very hard to park in Chicago. Its nice having the extra cab space, but consider the drawbacks as well.

Full size trucks usually have a little over 4 feet between the rear wheel tubs.
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Old 04-09-2011, 08:43 PM
 
Location: NW AR
174 posts, read 311,095 times
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I have a 98 ext cab 4x4 chevy 5.7 v8 6.5 foot bed
I am a cabinet maker and this truck is the best fit for me. It hauls every thing I ask it to and pulls my 19.5 foot ranger bass boat.I live in Mn and don't drive anything else most of the winter,It has been through weather you shouldn't be in.
The worst I ever get is 15 mpg and on the hwy not pulling anything I usually get 20 mpg
I've had a lot of trucks over the years and this one does what I need better than all others except the last 98 chevy I had in 2000, I had a 2007 toyota tacoma I bought new I only kept 1 year.
Small trucks are just small trucks and you get no better mpg than a good full size.
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Old 04-09-2011, 08:55 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 14,716,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
Unless it for your work have the sheetrock delievered and they will unload it which if many sheets is a job for two men.
I am one petite middle-aged woman and have loaded and unloaded many a truckload of drywall all by my itty bitty self. I am a painting and drywall contractor. You must be referring to very weak men.

Back to your regularly scheduled thread.

I also agree that a small pickup truck would not be the best choice for the OP.
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Old 04-10-2011, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
513 posts, read 950,390 times
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Thank you people for all these answers, I'll do some further research before I buy something, at this point I want to skip small trucks and buy sth American with extended cab. I walked down my street today and noticed that all beds in trucks are 6' long, didn't see one wich would be 8' and yes ext cabs look roomy. Just wondering - maybe I don't need 8 feet - i can always leave the tailgate open and fasten boards down, I'm not going to buy material far away... Is there any other adventage of having 8 feet bed..maybe I could fit a long sofa though...

I had an SUV once (Jeep Cherokee) and didn't like it, took lots of gas and never could fit anything in there, and hooking up a trailer each time would be a pain, leaving trailers on streets is illegal in Chicago anyway.

And yes, hanging drywall is a job for just 1 person - I always hang even ceilings myself (with a lift).

What do you guys think about this? -> http://chicago.craigslist.org/chc/cto/2314946028.html (broken link)

Last edited by moskiter; 04-10-2011 at 01:18 AM..
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